2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157791
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depression and Depression Prevention Discourses Among Taiwanese Older Adults
Abstract:
Depression and Depression Prevention Discourses Among Taiwanese Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Lu, Li-Ching, PhC, MN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing, Department of Psychosocial and Community Health
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Contact Address:9704 40th Ave NE, Seattle, WA, 98115, USA
Contact Telephone:206-992-0470
 Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe how Taiwanese older adults view depression and depression prevention and to critically evaluate how their accounts about depression and depression prevention are shaped by the Taiwanese social and cultural contexts. Background: Depression is a common and internationally recognized mental health problem in older adults. In spite of the worldwide shared awareness of depression, there is no universal agreement on the way of conceptualizing depression. Literature shows that there is a discrepancy in conceptualizing depression between Western biomedicine and Chinese discourse. There is no equivalent word for depression in many languages and no linguistic equivalence for the concept of depression. Although the word Depression may be translated into different language, such as you yu jheng in Chinese and is widely circulated in the public media, little is known about how Taiwanese older adults make sense of depression  and what they need for managing and preventing depression. Methods: This is a critical discourse analysis (CDA) study design. CDA is a set of methodological approaches to study the relationships between language and society. It enables this study to explore how the knowledge of depression among Taiwanese older adults is constructed and used in social interactions and to examine how the macro level of social practice influences the construction of discourse. A purposive sample of 28 community-dwelling older adults without a diagnosis of depression was recruited from 7 communities in northern Taiwan. Data was collected through in-depth individual interviews. All interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim, and then analyzed using CDA to examine how participants talked about depression, how they positioned themselves in the talk and what rhetorical moves they made in their talk. Results: Most older adults reported that they had heard about the word Depression but did not understand what Depression exactly meant. The ways in which older adults constructed accounts of depression and depression prevention reflected the Chinese cultural value of harmonious relationships between the individual and his/her significant social groups. Depression was conceptualized as the consequence of obsessive thoughts about issues related to descendents and others' evaluation. Obsessive thoughts were perceived to result from imbalance of the individual's mind and changes of traditional Chinese family structure and values in society. Older adults produced themselves as in the position of vulnerability relative to the changes in society meanwhile they viewed themselves as accountable for adapting to the changes. Depression was conceptualized as a preventable phenomenon when an individual assumed responsibility of increasing physical and social activities to maintain a state of balance between his/her mind, body and the society. Implications: The study findings informs researchers, healthcare providers and policy makers about how Taiwanese older adults shape accounts about depression and depression prevention in light of Chinese family values, interpersonal relationships and social integration. Attending to all accounts of depression may help extend our gaze beyond a focus on the Western biomedical discourse that keeps marginalizing the broader social and cultural factors that contribute to depression. Recognizing depression as a consequence of social and contextual issue rather than an individual problem may reveal the subtle ways culturally sensitive and contextually relevant depression prevention programs can be generated.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepression and Depression Prevention Discourses Among Taiwanese Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157791-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depression and Depression Prevention Discourses Among Taiwanese Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lu, Li-Ching, PhC, MN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing, Department of Psychosocial and Community Health</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9704 40th Ave NE, Seattle, WA, 98115, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-992-0470</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">liching@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">&nbsp;Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe how Taiwanese older adults view depression and depression prevention and to critically evaluate how their accounts about depression and depression prevention are shaped by the Taiwanese social and cultural contexts. Background: Depression is a common and internationally recognized mental health problem in older adults. In spite of the worldwide shared awareness of depression, there is no universal agreement on the way of conceptualizing depression. Literature shows that there is a discrepancy in conceptualizing depression between Western biomedicine and Chinese discourse. There is no equivalent word for depression in many languages and no linguistic equivalence for the concept of depression. Although the word Depression may be translated into different language, such as you yu jheng in Chinese and is widely circulated in the public media, little is known about how Taiwanese older adults make sense of depression&nbsp; and what they need for managing and preventing depression. Methods: This is a critical discourse analysis (CDA) study design. CDA is a set of methodological approaches to study the relationships between language and society. It enables this study to explore how the knowledge of depression among Taiwanese older adults is constructed and used in social interactions and to examine how the macro level of social practice influences the construction of discourse. A purposive sample of 28 community-dwelling older adults without a diagnosis of depression was recruited from 7 communities in northern Taiwan. Data was collected through in-depth individual interviews. All interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim, and then analyzed using CDA to examine how participants talked about depression, how they positioned themselves in the talk and what rhetorical moves they made in their talk. Results: Most older adults reported that they had heard about the word Depression but did not understand what Depression exactly meant. The ways in which older adults constructed accounts of depression and depression prevention reflected the Chinese cultural value of harmonious relationships between the individual and his/her significant social groups. Depression was conceptualized as the consequence of obsessive thoughts about issues related to descendents and others' evaluation. Obsessive thoughts were perceived to result from imbalance of the individual's mind and changes of traditional Chinese family structure and values in society. Older adults produced themselves as in the position of vulnerability relative to the changes in society meanwhile they viewed themselves as accountable for adapting to the changes. Depression was conceptualized as a preventable phenomenon when an individual assumed responsibility of increasing physical and social activities to maintain a state of balance between his/her mind, body and the society. Implications: The study findings informs researchers, healthcare providers and policy makers about how Taiwanese older adults shape accounts about depression and depression prevention in light of Chinese family values, interpersonal relationships and social integration. Attending to all accounts of depression may help extend our gaze beyond a focus on the Western biomedical discourse that keeps marginalizing the broader social and cultural factors that contribute to depression. Recognizing depression as a consequence of social and contextual issue rather than an individual problem may reveal the subtle ways culturally sensitive and contextually relevant depression prevention programs can be generated.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:12:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:12:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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