2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157793
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Literacy and Self-Efficacy Among Low-Income Men With Prostate Cancer
Abstract:
Health Literacy and Self-Efficacy Among Low-Income Men With Prostate Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Maliski, Sally L., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:4-250 Factor Bldg, Box 956918, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6918, USA
Contact Telephone:310-206-3782
Co-Authors:Mark S. Litwin, MD, MPH, Professor
Aims: Health literacy is key for patients to successfully access care and information needed to optimize health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This study examined relationships between health literacy and self-efficacy for patient-physician interaction, prostate cancer-specific symptom function and bother, and HRQOL. Specifically, we: (1) measured health literacy, self-efficacy for interacting with physicians, and disease specific and general (HRQOL) using standardized instruments; and (2) examined associations between health literacy level and self-efficacy for interacting with physicians, HRQOL, disease-specific QOL, and sociodemographic factors. Background: Little is known about the interplay of health literacy and self-efficacy on the ability of low income and culturally-diverse populations to take charge of their illness such that symptoms can be effectively managed and HRQOL maintained. While low self-efficacy has been shown to be detrimental to understanding critical health information, the relationship between self-efficacy (i.e., confidence in one?s ability to interact with physicians) and health literacy remain largely unexplored. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive design used primary and secondary data. Participants were recruited from a larger study of uninsured, low income men who had been treated for prostate cancer through a state-funded program. As part of this larger study, men had completed sociodemographic and clinical information and measures of HRQOL and self-efficacy. The 40 men participating in our study completed the Test of Functional Health Literacy-Adult (TOFHLA). Analyses included univariate and multiple regression techniques. Results: Results indicated that mean reading comprehension (p=.04) and numeracy (p=.006) are significantly higher for those with a high school education. Numeracy was significantly higher for Caucasians (p=<.0001) and English speakers (p=<.0001), but reading comprehension was not. The highest means for these men indicated inadequate functional health literacy. In bivariate analyses with mean subscale scores of the SF-12v2 (HRQOL) and the PCI (disease-specific) QOL, more urinary bother (troublesomeness of incontinence) was significantly associated with lower reading comprehension (p=.047). In multivariate analysis for self-efficacy and controlling for the HRQOL covariates, no models were significant. The Physical Composite and Mental Composite subscales of the SF-12v2 approached significance for reading comprehension. Better composite scores were associated with higher health literacy. Implications: Identification of significant associations between health literacy and self-efficacy will help in understanding the role that health literacy plays in obtaining and understanding information necessary for effective self-management of chronic, life-threatening illness and to lay the groundwork for the development of interventions specific to the needs of extremely vulnerable populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Literacy and Self-Efficacy Among Low-Income Men With Prostate Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157793-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Literacy and Self-Efficacy Among Low-Income Men With Prostate Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Maliski, Sally L., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4-250 Factor Bldg, Box 956918, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6918, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">310-206-3782</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smaliski@sonnet.ucla.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mark S. Litwin, MD, MPH, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aims: Health literacy is key for patients to successfully access care and information needed to optimize health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This study examined relationships between health literacy and self-efficacy for patient-physician interaction, prostate cancer-specific symptom function and bother, and HRQOL. Specifically, we: (1) measured health literacy, self-efficacy for interacting with physicians, and disease specific and general (HRQOL) using standardized instruments; and (2) examined associations between health literacy level and self-efficacy for interacting with physicians, HRQOL, disease-specific QOL, and sociodemographic factors. Background: Little is known about the interplay of health literacy and self-efficacy on the ability of low income and culturally-diverse populations to take charge of their illness such that symptoms can be effectively managed and HRQOL maintained. While low self-efficacy has been shown to be detrimental to understanding critical health information, the relationship between self-efficacy (i.e., confidence in one?s ability to interact with physicians) and health literacy remain largely unexplored. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive design used primary and secondary data. Participants were recruited from a larger study of uninsured, low income men who had been treated for prostate cancer through a state-funded program. As part of this larger study, men had completed sociodemographic and clinical information and measures of HRQOL and self-efficacy. The 40 men participating in our study completed the Test of Functional Health Literacy-Adult (TOFHLA). Analyses included univariate and multiple regression techniques. Results: Results indicated that mean reading comprehension (p=.04) and numeracy (p=.006) are significantly higher for those with a high school education. Numeracy was significantly higher for Caucasians (p=&lt;.0001) and English speakers (p=&lt;.0001), but reading comprehension was not. The highest means for these men indicated inadequate functional health literacy. In bivariate analyses with mean subscale scores of the SF-12v2 (HRQOL) and the PCI (disease-specific) QOL, more urinary bother (troublesomeness of incontinence) was significantly associated with lower reading comprehension (p=.047). In multivariate analysis for self-efficacy and controlling for the HRQOL covariates, no models were significant. The Physical Composite and Mental Composite subscales of the SF-12v2 approached significance for reading comprehension. Better composite scores were associated with higher health literacy. Implications: Identification of significant associations between health literacy and self-efficacy will help in understanding the role that health literacy plays in obtaining and understanding information necessary for effective self-management of chronic, life-threatening illness and to lay the groundwork for the development of interventions specific to the needs of extremely vulnerable populations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:12:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:12:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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