2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157794
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Care Access and the Community Reintegration of Male Parolees
Abstract:
Health Care Access and the Community Reintegration of Male Parolees
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Marlow, Elizabeth, NP, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:3-653 Factor Bldg, Box 956917, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6917, USA
Contact Telephone:310-825-6892
Aim: The aim of the study was to understand how health care access affects the community reintegration of male parolees. Background: Parolees often have long criminal histories and their time in the free community is punctuated by multiple incarcerations. Approximately 60% to 70% of all individuals on parole are rearrested and reincarcerated within three years of release from prison. Formerly incarcerated individuals frequently have limited employment skills, have not finished high school, and have physical and mental health problems and addiction disorders at rates greater than the general population. These individuals' continued involvement in correctional and criminal life further removes them from the institutions and experiences necessary (e.g. health care, education, and legal employment) for a stable life in civil society. Methods: Hermeneutic phenomenology guided the conduct of the study and the analysis of the data. Phenomenology aims to describe distinct beliefs, patterns, and practices amongst individuals with a shared or similar experience, i.e. chronically ill men on parole. The hermeneutic process provides an understanding of how certain aspects of the individual and his situation open up possibilities and close down others in his efforts to access health care services in the community. The method does this via in-depth analysis of narrative data. Data were collected via repeat individual interviews with chronically ill male parolees 40 to 65 years of age. Thirty-two in-depth interviews with 17 participants were completed. Results: Findings revealed three patterns of engagement with the health care system: (1) ambivalent engagement with an inconsistent and unreliable health care system, (2) dismissive engagement with the health care system, and (3) engagement with street life that overrode health care concerns and reintegration efforts in general. Through these patterns of engagement participants explicated their perceptions of the impact of heath care access on their reintegration efforts. Implications: These findings suggest a need for new ways of conceptualizing reintegration that includes health more centrally in the processes of success or failure. The health care system has the potential to be a positive influence in these individuals' lives. In order to effectively support and care for chronically ill individuals on parole, the health care system, as an institution and as individual clinicians, must begin to integrate the problems and issues of long term involvement in criminal and correctional life into its evaluation and treatment of these individuals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Care Access and the Community Reintegration of Male Paroleesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157794-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Care Access and the Community Reintegration of Male Parolees</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Marlow, Elizabeth, NP, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3-653 Factor Bldg, Box 956917, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6917, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">310-825-6892</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">emarlownp@yahoo.com, emarlow@sonnet.ucla.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: The aim of the study was to understand how health care access affects the community reintegration of male parolees. Background: Parolees often have long criminal histories and their time in the free community is punctuated by multiple incarcerations. Approximately 60% to 70% of all individuals on parole are rearrested and reincarcerated within three years of release from prison. Formerly incarcerated individuals frequently have limited employment skills, have not finished high school, and have physical and mental health problems and addiction disorders at rates greater than the general population. These individuals' continued involvement in correctional and criminal life further removes them from the institutions and experiences necessary (e.g. health care, education, and legal employment) for a stable life in civil society. Methods: Hermeneutic phenomenology guided the conduct of the study and the analysis of the data. Phenomenology aims to describe distinct beliefs, patterns, and practices amongst individuals with a shared or similar experience, i.e. chronically ill men on parole. The hermeneutic process provides an understanding of how certain aspects of the individual and his situation open up possibilities and close down others in his efforts to access health care services in the community. The method does this via in-depth analysis of narrative data. Data were collected via repeat individual interviews with chronically ill male parolees 40 to 65 years of age. Thirty-two in-depth interviews with 17 participants were completed. Results: Findings revealed three patterns of engagement with the health care system: (1) ambivalent engagement with an inconsistent and unreliable health care system, (2) dismissive engagement with the health care system, and (3) engagement with street life that overrode health care concerns and reintegration efforts in general. Through these patterns of engagement participants explicated their perceptions of the impact of heath care access on their reintegration efforts. Implications: These findings suggest a need for new ways of conceptualizing reintegration that includes health more centrally in the processes of success or failure. The health care system has the potential to be a positive influence in these individuals' lives. In order to effectively support and care for chronically ill individuals on parole, the health care system, as an institution and as individual clinicians, must begin to integrate the problems and issues of long term involvement in criminal and correctional life into its evaluation and treatment of these individuals.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:12:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:12:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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