2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157797
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Welfare-to-Wellness-to-Work Program
Abstract:
A Welfare-to-Wellness-to-Work Program
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Martin, Carolyn T., RN, CFNP, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:California State University, Stanislaus, Nursing
Title:Graduate Coordinator, Assistant Director
Contact Address:One University Circle, DBH 257, Turlock, CA, 95382, USA
Contact Telephone:209-664-6591
Co-Authors:Judith L. Keswick, MS, RN; Paula LeVeck, RN, PhD
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study is to examine participants of a community-based welfare-to-wellness-to-work program called Wellness WORKs!: The Basics. The aims of the study are to: (1) Describe the characteristics of the recipients of the Wellness WORKs!: The Basics program; and (2) Identify strategies that the recipients have successfully implemented to maintain employment. Background: Failure to address the significant impact on welfare recipients' health secondary to earning ability and access to health care is an urgent public policy issue. Studies that describe and analyze current strategies to maintain health and success in the work place are limited. In response to this crisis, this community-based study examined participants in a welfare-to-wellness-to-work program. This program consists of holistically based wellness classes and activities founded by a nurse educator. Method: This cross-sectional, exploratory study investigates and describes a welfare-to wellness-to-work program located in one county in the western United States. Adults (n=35) aged 23-57 years old, who participated in the program from 2001-2007, completed a demographic/health survey and were interviewed. Interviews at the Wellness WORKs! The Basics facility, using open-ended questions, were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. Demographic data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Subjects were recruited from the Wellness WORKs!: The Basics program. Results: From open-ended, semi-structured questions, the study identified key themes related to the program. Content analysis of the data revealed significant insights about the program's curriculum, positive changes for the participants, obstacles and challenges they confronted, employment success, and a motivational tool. Participants gained overwhelming benefit from the program and enhanced their functioning as individuals, family members, and parents. Implications: Nurses, social workers, and others can use these findings to develop effective welfare-to-wellness-to-work programs. This study demonstrates the valuable contribution a program can make that incorporates a health promoting curriculum for welfare recipients prior to employment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Welfare-to-Wellness-to-Work Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157797-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Welfare-to-Wellness-to-Work Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Martin, Carolyn T., RN, CFNP, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University, Stanislaus, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Coordinator, Assistant Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">One University Circle, DBH 257, Turlock, CA, 95382, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">209-664-6591</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cmartin2@csustan.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith L. Keswick, MS, RN; Paula LeVeck, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study is to examine participants of a community-based welfare-to-wellness-to-work program called Wellness WORKs!: The Basics. The aims of the study are to: (1) Describe the characteristics of the recipients of the Wellness WORKs!: The Basics program; and (2) Identify strategies that the recipients have successfully implemented to maintain employment. Background: Failure to address the significant impact on welfare recipients' health secondary to earning ability and access to health care is an urgent public policy issue. Studies that describe and analyze current strategies to maintain health and success in the work place are limited. In response to this crisis, this community-based study examined participants in a welfare-to-wellness-to-work program. This program consists of holistically based wellness classes and activities founded by a nurse educator. Method: This cross-sectional, exploratory study investigates and describes a welfare-to wellness-to-work program located in one county in the western United States. Adults (n=35) aged 23-57 years old, who participated in the program from 2001-2007, completed a demographic/health survey and were interviewed. Interviews at the Wellness WORKs! The Basics facility, using open-ended questions, were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. Demographic data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Subjects were recruited from the Wellness WORKs!: The Basics program. Results: From open-ended, semi-structured questions, the study identified key themes related to the program. Content analysis of the data revealed significant insights about the program's curriculum, positive changes for the participants, obstacles and challenges they confronted, employment success, and a motivational tool. Participants gained overwhelming benefit from the program and enhanced their functioning as individuals, family members, and parents. Implications: Nurses, social workers, and others can use these findings to develop effective welfare-to-wellness-to-work programs. This study demonstrates the valuable contribution a program can make that incorporates a health promoting curriculum for welfare recipients prior to employment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:12:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:12:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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