2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157799
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teaching a Required Global Health, Human Diversity Nursing Course
Abstract:
Teaching a Required Global Health, Human Diversity Nursing Course
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Maughan, Erin D., RN-BC, MS, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:552 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA
Contact Telephone:801-422-0493
Co-Authors:Rae Jeanne Memmott, RN, MS, Associate Professor & International Coordinator
Purpose: To ensure students from Brigham Young University (BYU) College of Nursing achieve the global health and human diversity outcomes documented in AACN's Essentials of Baccalaureate Education, a four credit required course entitled "Global Health and Human Diversity" was developed. The purpose of the course is to assist students to better understand the impact of culture on health; learn how to provide culturally competent care to individuals, families, and populations; and to learn about global health trends. Background: When the AACN's Cultural Competency in Baccalaureate Nursing Education and the associated Toolkit were published, we reviewed the material in our course and incorporated several ideas into the course. Information in the toolkit also supported many of the assignments and clinical locations, which were already part of our course. Implementation: Our course is made up of both a didactic and a clinical component. The didactic component and four assignments (population assessment, an analysis of a global health issue, a teaching activity, and a reflective writing) provide cohesion and structure. The clinical component provides diversity through a variety of local, national, and international clinical sites. All enrolled students begin the course by attending "immersion days." Immersion days are usually organized in a conference format, with guest speakers who focus on topics pertinent to the course, such as the structure of health care systems, paradigm shifts, the impact of culture on health and illness, and health care decision making. Students also participate in activities that promote self-assessment related to their own prejudices and biases. Group presentations expose students to a variety of cultures. Clinical sites expose students to at-risk and underserved population from varying cultures. Local sites include the Utah State Prison, Veterans Clinics, rural hospitals, populations with infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis, alternative and complementary practices, and families and children with disabilities and chronic illness. Stateside experiences include Wendover schools, the Navajo Reservation, and Hawaii. International sites include Ghana, Jordan, Australia, Argentina, and Ecuador. Evaluation: The course has been in existence in its current form for four years. Students indicate the course increases their understanding of cultures and global health issues. We are in the process of analyzing data to determine the impact of the course on student learning in a number of areas such as cultural competency and self-awareness. Conclusion: This coming year we will incorporate additional ideas found in the AACN toolkit. Although our existing course, with its didactic and clinical components, is already aligned with the intentions of the Cultural Competency in Baccalaureate Nursing Education document, further refinements are anticipated to enhance cultural competence of nursing graduates.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeaching a Required Global Health, Human Diversity Nursing Courseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157799-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Teaching a Required Global Health, Human Diversity Nursing Course</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Maughan, Erin D., RN-BC, MS, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">552 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-422-0493</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">erin_maughan@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rae Jeanne Memmott, RN, MS, Associate Professor &amp; International Coordinator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To ensure students from Brigham Young University (BYU) College of Nursing achieve the global health and human diversity outcomes documented in AACN's Essentials of Baccalaureate Education, a four credit required course entitled &quot;Global Health and Human Diversity&quot; was developed. The purpose of the course is to assist students to better understand the impact of culture on health; learn how to provide culturally competent care to individuals, families, and populations; and to learn about global health trends. Background: When the AACN's Cultural Competency in Baccalaureate Nursing Education and the associated Toolkit were published, we reviewed the material in our course and incorporated several ideas into the course. Information in the toolkit also supported many of the assignments and clinical locations, which were already part of our course. Implementation: Our course is made up of both a didactic and a clinical component. The didactic component and four assignments (population assessment, an analysis of a global health issue, a teaching activity, and a reflective writing) provide cohesion and structure. The clinical component provides diversity through a variety of local, national, and international clinical sites. All enrolled students begin the course by attending &quot;immersion days.&quot; Immersion days are usually organized in a conference format, with guest speakers who focus on topics pertinent to the course, such as the structure of health care systems, paradigm shifts, the impact of culture on health and illness, and health care decision making. Students also participate in activities that promote self-assessment related to their own prejudices and biases. Group presentations expose students to a variety of cultures. Clinical sites expose students to at-risk and underserved population from varying cultures. Local sites include the Utah State Prison, Veterans Clinics, rural hospitals, populations with infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis, alternative and complementary practices, and families and children with disabilities and chronic illness. Stateside experiences include Wendover schools, the Navajo Reservation, and Hawaii. International sites include Ghana, Jordan, Australia, Argentina, and Ecuador. Evaluation: The course has been in existence in its current form for four years. Students indicate the course increases their understanding of cultures and global health issues. We are in the process of analyzing data to determine the impact of the course on student learning in a number of areas such as cultural competency and self-awareness. Conclusion: This coming year we will incorporate additional ideas found in the AACN toolkit. Although our existing course, with its didactic and clinical components, is already aligned with the intentions of the Cultural Competency in Baccalaureate Nursing Education document, further refinements are anticipated to enhance cultural competence of nursing graduates.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:12:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:12:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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