2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157801
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Experience of Nursing Faculty with Students Who Fail
Abstract:
The Experience of Nursing Faculty with Students Who Fail
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:McAllister, Lydia, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Seattle University, College of Nursing
Title:Dr.
Contact Address:901 12th Avenue, P.O. Box 222000, Seattle, WA, 98122-1090, USA
Contact Telephone:425-208-1157
Co-Authors:Toni M. Vezeau, PhD, RNC
Purpose/Aims of Study: The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore an under-researched but common area of nursing education, that of nursing faculty's experience of student academic failure. The goal was to identify the faculty's personal experience related to determining failure status and system supports and hindrances. Background: Nursing educators are in a unique position when working with students who fail. In the current healthcare and educational environment, the stakes are high for faculty, students, and the public when failure occurs.  In the midst of a nursing shortage, extreme tuition and loan costs, great competition for admission in programs, litigious educational and healthcare environments, and the increasing complexity of nursing care, faculty are challenged as to how to identify and support at-risk students, and when necessary, allow the students to earn a failing grade. Current literature primarily focuses on clinical failures and preceptor uncertainty.  There is scant literature that explores the faculty experience in depth, a necessary first step in exploring nursing student academic failures. Methods: Because there is scant literature exploring the faculty experience, researchers designed an initial single-site qualitative study. Funding and IRB approval were obtained. When researchers informed faculty about this study, more faculty volunteered than could be interviewed.  Thirteen lengthy individual semi-structured interviews were audio taped and transcribed. Content analysis was conducted by both researchers, reaching inter-coder consistency and agreement on themes.  Findings were compared to extant literature and key variables have been identified for use in further research. Results: Seven basic themes were identified: "Every class": While actual failures are few, at risk situations are common and serious. "Who's fault?" : Variant perspectives exist for where the responsibility for failure lies. "Consistency vs. Flexibility": Faculty state ambivalence in the use of evaluation criteria. ?Prevent and treat?:  Prevention strategies and handling of at-risk were strikingly similar. "Grey areas": Evaluation in both theory and clinical were discussed as murky endeavors. ?Many hats?: Both role diffusion and role strain complicate the student failure. "Scary":  Failure results in many risks for faculty: psychosocial, legal, and safety, despite support. Given the limited time, the podium presentation will be focused on the themes of responsibility and risks to faculty. Implications: The results of this study suggest that student failure is complex for faculty. Despite acknowledgement of support, faculty report much fear and potential threats.  Increased faculty skill and comfort with student failure can open up discussions for support and development of educational strategies. These results will inform a multi-site qualitative study to identify variables to be used in a national, web-based survey of faculty.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Experience of Nursing Faculty with Students Who Failen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157801-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Experience of Nursing Faculty with Students Who Fail</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McAllister, Lydia, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seattle University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dr.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">901 12th Avenue, P.O. Box 222000, Seattle, WA, 98122-1090, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">425-208-1157</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mcallisterl@seattleu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Toni M. Vezeau, PhD, RNC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims of Study: The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore an under-researched but common area of nursing education, that of nursing faculty's experience of student academic failure. The goal was to identify the faculty's personal experience related to determining failure status and system supports and hindrances. Background: Nursing educators are in a unique position when working with students who fail. In the current healthcare and educational environment, the stakes are high for faculty, students, and the public when failure occurs.&nbsp; In the midst of a nursing shortage, extreme tuition and loan costs, great competition for admission in programs, litigious educational and healthcare environments, and the increasing complexity of nursing care, faculty are challenged as to how to identify and support at-risk students, and when necessary, allow the students to earn a failing grade. Current literature primarily focuses on clinical failures and preceptor uncertainty.&nbsp; There is scant literature that explores the faculty experience in depth, a necessary first step in exploring nursing student academic failures.&nbsp;Methods: Because there is scant literature exploring the faculty experience, researchers designed an initial single-site qualitative study. Funding and IRB approval were obtained. When researchers informed faculty about this study, more faculty volunteered than could be interviewed. &nbsp;Thirteen lengthy individual semi-structured interviews were audio taped and transcribed. Content analysis was conducted by both researchers, reaching inter-coder consistency and agreement on themes.&nbsp; Findings were compared to extant literature and key variables have been identified for use in further research. Results: Seven basic themes were identified: &quot;Every class&quot;: While actual failures are few, at risk situations are common and serious. &quot;Who's fault?&quot; : Variant perspectives exist for where the responsibility for failure lies. &quot;Consistency vs. Flexibility&quot;: Faculty state ambivalence in the use of evaluation criteria. ?Prevent and treat?:&nbsp; Prevention strategies and handling of at-risk were strikingly similar. &quot;Grey areas&quot;: Evaluation in both theory and clinical were discussed as murky endeavors. ?Many hats?: Both role diffusion and role strain complicate the student failure. &quot;Scary&quot;:&nbsp; Failure results in many risks for faculty: psychosocial, legal, and safety, despite support. Given the limited time, the podium presentation will be focused on the themes of responsibility and risks to faculty. Implications: The results of this study suggest that student failure is complex for faculty. Despite acknowledgement of support, faculty report much fear and potential threats. &nbsp;Increased faculty skill and comfort with student failure can open up discussions for support and development of educational strategies. These results will inform a multi-site qualitative study to identify variables to be used in a national, web-based survey of faculty.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:13:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:13:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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