2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157807
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Proposed Theory of the Problem for Family Caregivers of Hospice Patients
Abstract:
A Proposed Theory of the Problem for Family Caregivers of Hospice Patients
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Melnyk, Bernadette, PhD, RN, CPNP/NPP, FAAN, FNAP
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, College Of Nursing & Healthcare Innovation
Title:Dean and Distinguished Foundation Professor in Nursing
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd St., Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Contact Telephone:602-496-2200
Co-Authors:Kathryn Lindstrom, MSN, FNP-BC, ACHPN, PhD Student
Purpose: To explore an innovative theoretical framework for the development of an intervention for family caregivers taking on a new role of caring for their loved ones on hospice in order to address poor emotional and functional coping outcomes for these family caregivers. Background of Problem and Linking to Proposed Theoretical Framework: Admission to hospice services in the United States can be a sudden and unanticipated event for families due to the complex attitudes towards death in society, ultimately affecting how we die.  Complicating these issues is a healthcare system that has difficulty communicating with family caregivers.  Family caregivers report they feel unprepared to care for their dying loved ones, what to expect from hospice services and what to expect during the dying process.  In addition, family caregivers report they do not know how to help their loved ones and wished they had done a better job in their role as a caregiver of their dying family member.  It is proposed that the root of the problem is that family caregivers lack an appropriate cognitive schema (a picture in the mind to know what to expect and how to respond) for this new role as a family caregiver of a dying loved one.  Although stress and coping theories have been the most common theoretical framework used with family caregivers, coping outcome measures have not been statistically significant in family caregivers of hospice patients. Therefore, it is suggested that stress and coping theories may not adequately address the root of the problem; in this case, that of a lack of a cognitive schema in a new role. Proposed Theoretical Perspective of the Problem:  Self-regulation theory is based on information processing explanations of emotional and functional coping outcomes and depends upon the formation of a cognitive schema to navigate life experiences.  Self-regulation theory posits that when a person receives concrete, objective information during a new stressful experience, they are able to create a cognitive schema that helps them to predict, understand and navigate their way through this new experience.  An intervention using self-regulation theory would include four tenets of preparatory information: 1) physical sensations and symptoms (what is seen and heard during an experience), 2) temporal characteristics (the event over time), 3) environmental features (social and contextual aspects to an event), and 4) causes of the sensations and symptoms.  Role theory posits that roles are negotiated within families and contends that role enactment is a process related to the clarity of role behaviors.  Interventions using role theory would include aspects of this role, such as information on how to assess and manage common symptoms, especially pain, information on how hospice can assist them in caring for their loved one, and skills regarding the importance of and how to better care for themselves. Caregivers should be invited to choose those areas that they need assistance with to perform better in this new role. Conclusion:  It is suggested that self-regulation and role theories be combined as an innovative theoretical framework to develop an intervention for family caregivers of newly admitted hospice patients to address a family caregiver's lack of cognitive schema in their new role of caring for a dying loved one.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Proposed Theory of the Problem for Family Caregivers of Hospice Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157807-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Proposed Theory of the Problem for Family Caregivers of Hospice Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Melnyk, Bernadette, PhD, RN, CPNP/NPP, FAAN, FNAP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, College Of Nursing &amp; Healthcare Innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean and Distinguished Foundation Professor in Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd St., Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">602-496-2200</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bernadette.melnyk@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathryn Lindstrom, MSN, FNP-BC, ACHPN, PhD Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To explore an innovative theoretical framework for the development of an intervention for family caregivers taking on a new role of caring for their loved ones on hospice in order to address poor emotional and functional coping outcomes for these family caregivers. Background of Problem and Linking to Proposed Theoretical Framework: Admission to hospice services in the United States can be a sudden and unanticipated event for families due to the complex attitudes towards death in society, ultimately affecting how we die.&nbsp; Complicating these issues is a healthcare system that has difficulty communicating with family caregivers.&nbsp; Family caregivers report they feel unprepared to care for their dying loved ones, what to expect from hospice services and what to expect during the dying process.&nbsp; In addition, family caregivers report they do not know how to help their loved ones and wished they had done a better job in their role as a caregiver of their dying family member.&nbsp; It is proposed that the root of the problem is that family caregivers lack an appropriate cognitive schema (a picture in the mind to know what to expect and how to respond) for this new role as a family caregiver of a dying loved one.&nbsp; Although stress and coping theories have been the most common theoretical framework used with family caregivers, coping outcome measures have not been statistically significant in family caregivers of hospice patients. Therefore, it is suggested that stress and coping theories may not adequately address the root of the problem; in this case, that of a lack of a cognitive schema in a new role.&nbsp;Proposed Theoretical Perspective of the Problem:&nbsp; Self-regulation theory is based on information processing explanations of emotional and functional coping outcomes and depends upon the formation of a cognitive schema to navigate life experiences.&nbsp; Self-regulation theory posits that when a person receives concrete, objective information during a new stressful experience, they are able to create a cognitive schema that helps them to predict, understand and navigate their way through this new experience.&nbsp; An intervention using self-regulation theory would include four tenets of preparatory information: 1) physical sensations and symptoms (what is seen and heard during an experience), 2) temporal characteristics (the event over time), 3) environmental features (social and contextual aspects to an event), and 4) causes of the sensations and symptoms.&nbsp; Role theory posits that roles are negotiated within families and contends that role enactment is a process related to the clarity of role behaviors.&nbsp; Interventions using role theory would include aspects of this role, such as information on how to assess and manage common symptoms, especially pain, information on how hospice can assist them in caring for their loved one, and skills regarding the importance of and how to better care for themselves.&nbsp;Caregivers should be invited to choose those areas that they need assistance with to perform better in this new role.&nbsp;Conclusion:&nbsp; It is suggested that self-regulation and role theories be combined as an innovative theoretical framework to develop an intervention for family caregivers of newly admitted hospice patients to address a family caregiver's lack of cognitive schema in their new role of caring for a dying loved one.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:13:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:13:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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