2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157808
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Mental & Physical Health in College Freshman With 5 to Thrive/Cope
Abstract:
Improving Mental & Physical Health in College Freshman With 5 to Thrive/Cope
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Melnyk, Bernadette, PhD, RN, CPNP/NPP, FAAN, FNAP
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, College Of Nursing & Healthcare Innovation
Title:Dean and Distinguished Foundation Professor in Nursing
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd St., Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Contact Telephone:602-496-2200
Co-Authors:Kimberly Arcoleo, PhD, Assistant Professor; Diana Jacobson, MS, RN, CPNP, Research Assistant; Stephanie Kelly, MS, RN, FNP, Research Assistant; Mary Mays, PhD, Associate Professor; Judith O'Haver, PhD, RN, CPNP, Assistant Professor; Gabriel Shaibi, PhD, A
Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the preliminary efficacy of a 3-credit course entitled Freshman 5 to Thrive/COPE (Creating Opportunities for Personal Empowerment) Healthy Lifestyles on the mental health and healthy lifestyle behaviors of college freshman. Background: Approximately 34 percent of adolescents and young adults are overweight, with nearly two-thirds participating in less than three days/week of vigorous or moderate physical activity. There also is a decrease in physical activity in college from high school, with an average rate of weight gain more than .7 kg per year over a span of 10 years. In addition, according to the latest American College Health Assessment, approximately 30 percent of college students report that they feel overwhelmed by all they have to do and nearly 11 percent report feeling very sad. Methods: A pre- and post-test experimental design was used with 33 of 70 (47%) students in three sections who were taking the 3-credit semester long 5 to Thrive course. The students enrolled in the course were part of a living well residential community at a large public University in the Southwest. The 5 to Thrive course focused on five domains: (1) cognitive-behavioral skills building, (2) coping strategies, (3) personal development (e.g., including goal setting, problem solving), (4) nutrition, and (5) physical activity. Each class session included an hour of physical activity (e.g., rowing, dancing, and volleyball). Data also were collected on 16 freshman students who were not enrolled in 5 to Thrive as a comparison group. Results: Seventy-eight percent of the students were female, and 22 percent male. Seventy-six percent were Caucasian. Significant findings indicated that students taking 5 to Thrive versus those in the comparison group reported: (a) making healthier lifestyle choices, and (b) less perceived difficulty in leading a healthy lifestyle. Five to Thrive students also had significant drops in anxiety and depressive symptoms and a significant increase in pedometer steps from baseline to follow-up. Retention rate also was higher in the 5 to Thrive students than other University students not enrolled in the course. Implications: The 5 to Thrive course is a promising strategy for promoting the mental health and healthy lifestyle behaviors as well as retention in freshman college students.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Mental & Physical Health in College Freshman With 5 to Thrive/Copeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157808-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Improving Mental &amp; Physical Health in College Freshman With 5 to Thrive/Cope</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Melnyk, Bernadette, PhD, RN, CPNP/NPP, FAAN, FNAP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, College Of Nursing &amp; Healthcare Innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean and Distinguished Foundation Professor in Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd St., Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">602-496-2200</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bernadette.melnyk@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kimberly Arcoleo, PhD, Assistant Professor; Diana Jacobson, MS, RN, CPNP, Research Assistant; Stephanie Kelly, MS, RN, FNP, Research Assistant; Mary Mays, PhD, Associate Professor; Judith O'Haver, PhD, RN, CPNP, Assistant Professor; Gabriel Shaibi, PhD, A</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the preliminary efficacy of a 3-credit course entitled Freshman 5 to Thrive/COPE (Creating Opportunities for Personal Empowerment) Healthy Lifestyles on the mental health and healthy lifestyle behaviors of college freshman. Background: Approximately 34 percent of adolescents and young adults are overweight, with nearly two-thirds participating in less than three days/week of vigorous or moderate physical activity. There also is a decrease in physical activity in college from high school, with an average rate of weight gain more than .7 kg per year over a span of 10 years. In addition, according to the latest American College Health Assessment, approximately 30 percent of college students report that they feel overwhelmed by all they have to do and nearly 11 percent report feeling very sad. Methods: A pre- and post-test experimental design was used with 33 of 70 (47%) students in three sections who were taking the 3-credit semester long 5 to Thrive course. The students enrolled in the course were part of a living well residential community at a large public University in the Southwest. The 5 to Thrive course focused on five domains: (1) cognitive-behavioral skills building, (2) coping strategies, (3) personal development (e.g., including goal setting, problem solving), (4) nutrition, and (5) physical activity. Each class session included an hour of physical activity (e.g., rowing, dancing, and volleyball). Data also were collected on 16 freshman students who were not enrolled in 5 to Thrive as a comparison group. Results: Seventy-eight percent of the students were female, and 22 percent male. Seventy-six percent were Caucasian. Significant findings indicated that students taking 5 to Thrive versus those in the comparison group reported: (a) making healthier lifestyle choices, and (b) less perceived difficulty in leading a healthy lifestyle. Five to Thrive students also had significant drops in anxiety and depressive symptoms and a significant increase in pedometer steps from baseline to follow-up. Retention rate also was higher in the 5 to Thrive students than other University students not enrolled in the course. Implications: The 5 to Thrive course is a promising strategy for promoting the mental health and healthy lifestyle behaviors as well as retention in freshman college students.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:13:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:13:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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