2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157810
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Challenges in the Workplace Encountered by Individuals With Scleroderma
Abstract:
Challenges in the Workplace Encountered by Individuals With Scleroderma
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Mendelson, Cindy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico, College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:MSC 09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87114, USA
Contact Telephone:505-272-8241
Co-Authors:Saralynn J. Allaire, ScD, CRC, Professor; Janet L. Poole, PhD, OTR/L, Professor
Purpose: Scleroderma (SSc), is an autoimmune connective tissue disease that affects thousands of Americans.  Symptoms of SSc, including pain, finger ulcers, contractures, Raynaud's phenomena, and decreased pulmonary function, make it difficult for individuals with scleroderma to perform daily tasks including work, however there is no information about the barriers to work that they experience. The purpose of this qualitative study is to identify challenges and adaptations made by persons with scleroderma to continue to work. Background: Survival of patients with SSc has greatly increased over the past 20 years, most likely due to earlier diagnosis and therapy that is more effective.  Yet, despite this apparent medical success, SSc patients are not a healthy population, but rather are living longer with a chronic condition, complicated by multiple exacerbations and by remissions, but also by chronic disability that affects a high proportion of patients. Not being able to continue to work can contribute to poor physical and psychological well being and be an economic burden on the individual and society. Methods: Thirty participants with SSc who are employed at least 8 hours per week and report difficulty working due to the perceived symptoms from SSC are being recruited from a variety of sources to ensure that the sample is representative of the demographics of scleroderma and includes a variety of occupations. Participants will complete a survey tool that contains lists of potential health work problems and a demographic questionnaire.  Participants will be also be interviewed by telephone about specifically how SSc affects their ability to get to and from work, get around at work, manage the physical and mental demands of the job, work with others, handle the work environment, perform essential job functions, manage work and home,  job satisfaction and about any adaptations they have made. Descriptive statistics will be calculated for the demographic characteristics and number of health work problems.   Data analysis of the open-ended questions will include content analysis of the responses to individual questions. A data matrix that includes the interview questions and the responses will be created to visually display specific responses and to facilitate analysis of the data by question. Implications: Knowledge of the work barriers people with SSc experience and how they overcome these barriers is a first step towards helping persons with SSc obtain suitable job accommodations.   Once modifiable factors are identified, intervention or education can be implemented to reduce the work disability, and thus, reduce health care and work loss costs for persons with SSc.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChallenges in the Workplace Encountered by Individuals With Sclerodermaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157810-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Challenges in the Workplace Encountered by Individuals With Scleroderma</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mendelson, Cindy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC 09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87114, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-272-8241</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cfmendelson@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Saralynn J. Allaire, ScD, CRC, Professor; Janet L. Poole, PhD, OTR/L, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Scleroderma (SSc), is an autoimmune connective tissue disease that affects thousands of Americans.&nbsp; Symptoms of SSc, including pain, finger ulcers, contractures, Raynaud's phenomena, and decreased pulmonary function, make it difficult for individuals with scleroderma to perform daily tasks including work, however there is no information about the barriers to work that they experience. The purpose of this qualitative study is to identify challenges and adaptations made by persons with scleroderma to continue to work. Background: Survival of patients with SSc has greatly increased over the past 20 years, most likely due to earlier diagnosis and therapy that is more effective.&nbsp; Yet, despite this apparent medical success, SSc patients are not a healthy population, but rather are living longer with a chronic condition, complicated by multiple exacerbations and by remissions, but also by chronic disability that affects a high proportion of patients. Not being able to continue to work can contribute to poor physical and psychological well being and be an economic burden on the individual and society.&nbsp;Methods: Thirty participants with SSc who are employed at least 8 hours per week and report difficulty working due to the perceived symptoms from SSC are being recruited from a variety of sources to ensure that the sample is representative of the demographics of scleroderma and includes a variety of occupations.&nbsp;Participants will complete a survey tool that contains lists of potential health work problems and a demographic questionnaire.&nbsp; Participants will be also be interviewed by telephone about specifically how SSc affects their ability to get to and from work, get around at work, manage the physical and mental demands of the job, work with others, handle the work environment, perform essential job functions, manage work and home,&nbsp; job satisfaction and about any adaptations they have made.&nbsp;Descriptive statistics will be calculated for the demographic characteristics and number of health work problems. &nbsp;&nbsp;Data analysis of the open-ended questions will include content analysis of the responses to individual questions. A data matrix that includes the interview questions and the responses will be created to visually display specific responses and to facilitate analysis of the data by question. Implications: Knowledge of the work barriers people with SSc experience and how they overcome these barriers is a first step towards helping persons with SSc obtain suitable job accommodations.&nbsp;&nbsp; Once modifiable factors are identified, intervention or education can be implemented to reduce the work disability, and thus, reduce health care and work loss costs for persons with SSc.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:13:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:13:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.