Language Representing Recalled and Real-Time Everyday Breathing Intensity in COPD

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157814
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Language Representing Recalled and Real-Time Everyday Breathing Intensity in COPD
Abstract:
Language Representing Recalled and Real-Time Everyday Breathing Intensity in COPD
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Michaels, Cathy, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona, College of Nursing
Title:Clinical Associate Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA
Contact Telephone:520-626-9003
Purpose:  To describe and compare recalled and real-time natural language (individual spontaneous words and phrases) breathing intensity (BI) descriptors that individuals with COPD associated with moderate to severe pulmonary impairment used to represent everyday breathing intensity.  Background and Rationale:  The Symptom Interpretation Model (SIM), developed by Teel et al. and based on Leventhal's self-regulation framework, models a three-stage process: input, interpretation, and outcomes. Although SIM does not address language in the interpretation stage, Leventhal implied language use with a level of symptom processing labeled semantic processing.  Words shift with physiological and psychological changes, as evidenced by language research studies utilizing full text analysis.  Research in language and breathing pioneered by Simon in 1989 predominantly utilized laboratory-induced dyspnea to study participant selection of researcher-determined words and phrases to describe breathing intensity.  Michaels and Meek studied the language of everyday BI, but no known studies describe and compare recalled and real-time natural language associated with the symptom experience of BI.  Methods:  Using an exploratory design, 5 men and 5 women with a mean age of 71 (range 62-76) participated in an interview and screening as part of a larger study.  Self-reported COPD (Mean FEV1/FVC=46%, SD=12.8) and moderate to severe pulmonary impairment (Mean FEV1% pred. = 44%, SD=17.0) were documented with spirometry.  Participants recalled the most difficult and most comfortable everyday BI intensity experiences and performed the 6-Minute Walk Test, evaluating real-time BI with natural language as well as the modified Borg scale after each 200-foot laps.  Content analysis was used to analyze themes for recalled and real-time natural language breathing intensity descriptors.  Results:  Participants represented everyday BI with narratives naturally languaged using word and phrases categorized as description (e.g. "get real tight"), activity (e.g. "couldn't keep up [(walking]"), cause (e.g. "when I bend over, I lose my breath" ), intervention (e.g. "just had to stop and rest"), judgment (e.g. "just slight, a little more than before"), observation (like emotions, e.g. "frustrating and panicking at the same time"), prediction (e.g. "when I'm stressed I find it difficult to breathe") and relevance (e.g. "it's not my life, it is an inconvenience").  Everyday BI was most frequently represented by description, and about twice the descriptors were used to represent the most difficult breathing experience compared to the most comfortable.  Moreover, 6 of 10 participants represented the most comfortable breathing by describing what it is not, i.e. they referenced the most difficult BI.  Observation, intervention and cause were most frequently used to represent the most difficult breathing experience while observation, activity and judgment were most frequently used to represent the most comfortable breathing experience.  Judgment was primarily used to represent real-time BI, followed by observation and description.  Implications:  This study demonstrated the holistic way in which participants with COPD and moderate to severe pulmonary impairment used natural language to describe the symptom of everyday BI.  Narratives primarily represented BI as description, activity, cause, intervention, judgment, and observation of associated phenomena.  Recalled BI contributed a broader range of representation than real-time BI.  Continued research will demonstrate the best approach to representational assessment of symptoms for nurses to effectively coach and guide patients in everyday BI self-management. Supported by the Center on Injury Mechanisms and Related Responses (P20 NR007794), awarded to the University of Arizona College of Nursing by National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLanguage Representing Recalled and Real-Time Everyday Breathing Intensity in COPDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157814-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Language Representing Recalled and Real-Time Everyday Breathing Intensity in COPD</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Michaels, Cathy, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-626-9003</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cathym@nursing.arizona.edu, cathymichaels@cox.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose:&nbsp; To describe and compare recalled and real-time natural language (individual spontaneous words and phrases) breathing intensity (BI) descriptors that individuals with COPD associated with moderate to severe pulmonary impairment used to represent everyday breathing intensity.&nbsp; Background and Rationale:&nbsp; The Symptom Interpretation Model (SIM),&nbsp;developed by Teel et al. and based on Leventhal's self-regulation framework, models a three-stage process: input, interpretation, and outcomes. Although SIM does not address language in the interpretation stage, Leventhal implied language use with a level of symptom processing labeled semantic processing.&nbsp; Words shift with physiological and psychological changes, as evidenced by language research studies utilizing full text analysis.&nbsp; Research in language and breathing pioneered by Simon in 1989 predominantly utilized laboratory-induced dyspnea to study participant selection of researcher-determined words and phrases to describe breathing intensity.&nbsp; Michaels and Meek studied the language of everyday BI, but no known studies describe and compare recalled and real-time natural language associated with the symptom experience of BI.&nbsp; Methods:&nbsp; Using an exploratory design, 5 men and 5 women with a mean age of 71 (range 62-76) participated in an interview and screening as part of a larger study.&nbsp; Self-reported COPD (Mean FEV1/FVC=46%, SD=12.8) and moderate to severe pulmonary impairment (Mean FEV1% pred. = 44%, SD=17.0) were documented with spirometry.&nbsp; Participants recalled the most difficult and most comfortable everyday BI intensity experiences and performed the 6-Minute Walk Test, evaluating real-time BI with natural language as well as the modified Borg scale after each 200-foot laps.&nbsp; Content analysis was used to analyze themes for recalled and real-time natural language breathing intensity descriptors. &nbsp;Results:&nbsp; Participants represented everyday BI with narratives naturally languaged using word and phrases categorized as description (e.g. &quot;get real tight&quot;), activity (e.g. &quot;couldn't keep up [(walking]&quot;), cause (e.g. &quot;when I bend over, I lose my breath&quot; ), intervention (e.g. &quot;just had to stop and rest&quot;), judgment (e.g. &quot;just slight, a little more than before&quot;), observation (like emotions, e.g. &quot;frustrating and panicking at the same time&quot;), prediction (e.g. &quot;when I'm stressed I find it difficult to breathe&quot;) and relevance (e.g. &quot;it's not my life, it is an inconvenience&quot;).&nbsp; Everyday BI was most frequently represented by description, and about twice the descriptors were used to represent the most difficult breathing experience compared to the most comfortable.&nbsp; Moreover, 6 of 10 participants represented the most comfortable breathing by describing what it is not, i.e. they referenced the most difficult BI.&nbsp; Observation, intervention and cause were most frequently used to represent the most difficult breathing experience while observation, activity and judgment were most frequently used to represent the most comfortable breathing experience.&nbsp; Judgment was primarily used to represent real-time BI, followed by observation and description.&nbsp; Implications:&nbsp; This study demonstrated the holistic way in which participants with COPD and moderate to severe pulmonary impairment used natural language to describe the symptom of everyday BI.&nbsp; Narratives primarily represented BI as description, activity, cause, intervention, judgment, and observation of associated phenomena.&nbsp; Recalled BI contributed a broader range of representation than real-time BI.&nbsp; Continued research will demonstrate the best approach to representational assessment of symptoms for nurses to effectively coach and guide patients in everyday BI self-management. Supported by the Center on Injury Mechanisms and Related Responses (P20 NR007794), awarded to the University of Arizona College of Nursing by&nbsp;National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:13:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:13:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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