Determinants of Excessive Gestational Weight Gain in Hispanic Women in Los Angeles

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157815
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determinants of Excessive Gestational Weight Gain in Hispanic Women in Los Angeles
Abstract:
Determinants of Excessive Gestational Weight Gain in Hispanic Women in Los Angeles
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Mielke, Ruth T., CNM, MS
P.I. Institution Name:Azusa Pacific University, School of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:701 East Alosta Boulevard, PO Box 7000, Azusa, CA, 91702-7000, USA
Contact Telephone:213 300 3741
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study is to identify biological, psychosocial and behavioral determinants of excessive gestational weight gain in Hispanic women receiving prenatal care in Los Angeles. This study will also demonstrate how information from a tool intended for individual perinatal case management of low-income women may be used to generate data on a population of Hispanic women in Los Angeles. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Within the obesity epidemic, the fastest increase in overweight and obesity is among women of childbearing age. A key contributor to this trend is excessive weight gain during pregnancy resulting in postpartum weight retention and lifelong obesity. Women of ethnic minorities are not only more likely to have a higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI; kg/m2), but are also at greater risk for postpartum weight retention. As Hispanic women are part of the fastest growing ethnic minority in the United States, have the highest birthrates of all women, and are studied least often, focused attention to determinants of excessive gestational weight is critical. Self-Care Deficit Theory provides the conceptual framework utilizing concepts of; a) Basic Conditioning Factors (age, parity, pre-pregnancy BMI, acculturation, education and prenatal stress); b) Self-Care (maternal food-intake behaviors, general prenatal self-care behaviors); c) Self-Care Requisite (achieving adequate gestational weight gain) and d) Self-care Deficit (excessive gestational weight gain). Methods: The study design will be a secondary data analysis using prenatal chart review and selected responses to items from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health form - the Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program (CPSP) Prenatal Combined Assessment/Reassessment Tool. Chronological sampling of Hispanic women with singleton pregnancies initiating prenatal care prior to third trimester from November 2007 to July 2008 will be done. Data will be obtained by chart extraction from charts of women with adequate or excessive gestational weight gain weight gain who have had a CPSP Prenatal Combined Assessment/Reassessment Tool completed and who have delivered term infants (prenatal care to 36 weeks). Face and content validity of items selected from the form will be determined by comparison to validated tools and subjected to judge panel analysis by content experts. Education, prenatal stress and acculturation are hypothesized to influence weight gain through influence on prenatal self-care and maternal food intake behaviors. Biologic variables (pre-pregnancy BMI, age, parity) are hypothesized to have a direct influence on excessive gestational weight gain and may have an indirect effect on excessive gestational weight gain through maternal food intake and prenatal self-care behaviors. Descriptive statistics will be used for the sample description and variables. Comparisons between women with adequate and excessive gestational weight gain will be done using bivariate analysis and multivariate analysis. Path analysis will be used to describe the relationships among all of the variables. Results: This is research in process. If available, data to date will be presented. Implications: Identification of the determinants of excessive gestational weight gain in Hispanic women is essential in order to design strategies that will promote adequate gestational weight gain and reduce the risk of lifelong obesity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeterminants of Excessive Gestational Weight Gain in Hispanic Women in Los Angelesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157815-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Determinants of Excessive Gestational Weight Gain in Hispanic Women in Los Angeles</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mielke, Ruth T., CNM, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Azusa Pacific University, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">701 East Alosta Boulevard, PO Box 7000, Azusa, CA, 91702-7000, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">213 300 3741</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rmielke@sbcglobal.net, rmielke@apu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study is to identify biological, psychosocial and behavioral determinants of excessive gestational weight gain in Hispanic women receiving prenatal care in Los Angeles. This study will also demonstrate how information from a tool intended for individual perinatal case management of low-income women may be used to generate data on a population of Hispanic women in Los Angeles. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Within the obesity epidemic, the fastest increase in overweight and obesity is among women of childbearing age. A key contributor to this trend is excessive weight gain during pregnancy resulting in postpartum weight retention and lifelong obesity. Women of ethnic minorities are not only more likely to have a higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI; kg/m2), but are also at greater risk for postpartum weight retention. As Hispanic women are part of the fastest growing ethnic minority in the United States, have the highest birthrates of all women, and are studied least often, focused attention to determinants of excessive gestational weight is critical. Self-Care Deficit Theory provides the conceptual framework utilizing concepts of; a) Basic Conditioning Factors (age, parity, pre-pregnancy BMI, acculturation, education and prenatal stress); b) Self-Care (maternal food-intake behaviors, general prenatal self-care behaviors); c) Self-Care Requisite (achieving adequate gestational weight gain) and d) Self-care Deficit (excessive gestational weight gain). Methods: The study design will be a secondary data analysis using prenatal chart review and selected responses to items from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health form - the Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program (CPSP) Prenatal Combined Assessment/Reassessment Tool. Chronological sampling of Hispanic women with singleton pregnancies initiating prenatal care prior to third trimester from November 2007 to July 2008 will be done. Data will be obtained by chart extraction from charts of women with adequate or excessive gestational weight gain weight gain who have had a CPSP Prenatal Combined Assessment/Reassessment Tool completed and who have delivered term infants (prenatal care to 36 weeks). Face and content validity of items selected from the form will be determined by comparison to validated tools and subjected to judge panel analysis by content experts. Education, prenatal stress and acculturation are hypothesized to influence weight gain through influence on prenatal self-care and maternal food intake behaviors. Biologic variables (pre-pregnancy BMI, age, parity) are hypothesized to have a direct influence on excessive gestational weight gain and may have an indirect effect on excessive gestational weight gain through maternal food intake and prenatal self-care behaviors. Descriptive statistics will be used for the sample description and variables. Comparisons between women with adequate and excessive gestational weight gain will be done using bivariate analysis and multivariate analysis. Path analysis will be used to describe the relationships among all of the variables. Results: This is research in process. If available, data to date will be presented. Implications: Identification of the determinants of excessive gestational weight gain in Hispanic women is essential in order to design strategies that will promote adequate gestational weight gain and reduce the risk of lifelong obesity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:13:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:13:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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