2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157816
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Deconstructing Ambiguous Chronic Illness in Women: Nursing Implications
Abstract:
Deconstructing Ambiguous Chronic Illness in Women: Nursing Implications
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Johnson, Julie, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Dean
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 113 Henderson Hall, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:330-672-3777
Co-Authors:Karen E. Johnson, BA
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore how women with ambiguous chronic digestive illnesses struggle against the biomedical paradigm to cope with the daily realities of their condition. Background: Individuals with chronic illness comprise the largest group of health care consumers in America, yet our system is not equipped to meet their needs. The strength of the predominant biomedical paradigm is its ability to diagnose and treat acute conditions that have an identifiable organic cause and are curable by medication/surgery. Cartesian dualism, the separation of mind and body and a hallmark of biomedicine, suggests that providers who are confronted with conditions that produce physical suffering that cannot be "cured" are at a loss on how to proceed. This is particularly true of ambiguous chronic illnesses that have real symptoms of unidentifiable origin and no cure. These include Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Interstitial Cystitis, Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), Crohn?s Disease, and Celiac Disease. More common in females, symptoms are often trivialized and dismissed by providers. Gender stereotypes stigmatize women as "psychosomatic" leaving them to experience years of physical and emotional suffering prior to diagnosis. Methods: Using qualitative methods, interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of women with ambiguous chronic digestive illnesses. They ranged in age from 20 to 56 years. Their conditions included IBS (2), Crohn's Disease (1), Celiac Disease (1), and intestinal tissue damage due to a virus acquired from a dog (1). Data were analyzed using conceptual coding and constant comparative methods. Results: Findings showed that all participants had sought a diagnosis from multiple physicians and/ or nurse practitioners over 3-7 years. Themes that emerged included: "Misdiagnosis," "Delayed Diagnosis," "Trivialization," "Stigmatization," "Self Doubt," and "Embarrassment." Because they could not "get well" as defined by biomedicine, they felt depersonalized and deviant. Implications: Nurses need to be more aware of the physical and psychological symptoms of women experiencing ambiguous chronic illness. Listening to them, offering reassurance, and encouraging persistence in acquiring a diagnosis are essential to their physical and emotional well being. Nurses must also serve as advocates for women with physicians and nurse practitioners who still practice in the predominant biomedical approach to health care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeconstructing Ambiguous Chronic Illness in Women: Nursing Implicationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157816-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Deconstructing Ambiguous Chronic Illness in Women: Nursing Implications</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Julie, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 113 Henderson Hall, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-672-3777</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jjohns32@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen E. Johnson, BA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore how women with ambiguous chronic digestive illnesses struggle against the biomedical paradigm to cope with the daily realities of their condition. Background: Individuals with chronic illness comprise the largest group of health care consumers in America, yet our system is not equipped to meet their needs. The strength of the predominant biomedical paradigm is its ability to diagnose and treat acute conditions that have an identifiable organic cause and are curable by medication/surgery. Cartesian dualism, the separation of mind and body and a hallmark of biomedicine, suggests that providers who are confronted with conditions that produce physical suffering that cannot be &quot;cured&quot; are at a loss on how to proceed. This is particularly true of ambiguous chronic illnesses that have real symptoms of unidentifiable origin and no cure. These include Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Interstitial Cystitis, Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), Crohn?s Disease, and Celiac Disease. More common in females, symptoms are often trivialized and dismissed by providers. Gender stereotypes stigmatize women as &quot;psychosomatic&quot; leaving them to experience years of physical and emotional suffering prior to diagnosis. Methods: Using qualitative methods, interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of women with ambiguous chronic digestive illnesses. They ranged in age from 20 to 56 years. Their conditions included IBS (2), Crohn's Disease (1), Celiac Disease (1), and intestinal tissue damage due to a virus acquired from a dog (1). Data were analyzed using conceptual coding and constant comparative methods. Results: Findings showed that all participants had sought a diagnosis from multiple physicians and/ or nurse practitioners over 3-7 years. Themes that emerged included: &quot;Misdiagnosis,&quot; &quot;Delayed Diagnosis,&quot; &quot;Trivialization,&quot; &quot;Stigmatization,&quot; &quot;Self Doubt,&quot; and &quot;Embarrassment.&quot; Because they could not &quot;get well&quot; as defined by biomedicine, they felt depersonalized and deviant. Implications: Nurses need to be more aware of the physical and psychological symptoms of women experiencing ambiguous chronic illness. Listening to them, offering reassurance, and encouraging persistence in acquiring a diagnosis are essential to their physical and emotional well being. Nurses must also serve as advocates for women with physicians and nurse practitioners who still practice in the predominant biomedical approach to health care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:13:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:13:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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