2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157817
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural Perceptions of Childbirth in the Netherlands
Abstract:
Cultural Perceptions of Childbirth in the Netherlands
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Johnson, Taralyn, RN, BS
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Pediatric RN and FNP Student
Contact Address:802 Wymount, Provo, UT, 84604, USA
Contact Telephone:801-301-1218
Co-Authors:Lynn Clark Callister, RN, PhD, FAAN
Purpose: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe the meaning of childbirth to women giving birth at home in The Netherlands. This study builds on two decades of cross cultural studies with childbearing women. Background: The Netherlands has a unique approach to health care for childbearing families, with a home birth rate of about 30%. Outcomes associated with giving birth at home with a midwife caregiver translates into low infant and maternal morbidity and mortality rates, as well as few interventions. Childbearing is seen as a healthy process by Dutch health care providers, insurance programs, and the government. Research has described giving birth in the Netherlands from a sociological perspective (DeVries, 2004), but no research published in English could be found describing the meaning of childbirth to Dutch women having home births. Method: Following IRB approval and informed consent, fourteen women who had given birth unmedicated at home in the Netherlands in the previous year receiving health care at the Voorburg Midwifery Clinic (a suburb of The Hague) were interviewed. Audiotaped interviews were transcribed and data analyzed as appropriate for phenomenological inquiry. Trustworthiness of the data was ensured by keeping a journal of impressions, keeping an audit trail, and conducting member checks electronically with five of the women who participated in the study.
Results: Women who had previously experienced a hospital birth were very positive about giving birth at home within a calm, peaceful environment surrounded by loved ones with a supportive midwife-caregiver. They spoke of working with the pain as a normal expected part of the process of laboring and giving birth, "[Labor] was very strong, intense, painful. You really get to know your spirit more." Women expressed a sense of self actualization, "I did it! I succeeded! I am capable of doing such a thing and I am capable of being calm during the process. I felt so in touch with myself." Meaning was articulated as these women recalled the moment of birth, "Seeing her little face, I'll never forget that. I remember being ecstatic, very happy and very powerful. You feel you are capable of doing almost anything." Implications for Clinical Practice: This research increases understanding of health care delivery systems globally to help inform policy making and the design of health care, including more judicious use of technology and evidence based practice. Findings can be utilized to increase the cultural competence of nurses as descriptive data was generated about women's perspectives and beliefs about childbearing (Callister, 2004). Increased cultural awareness will contribute to continuous quality improvement in the delivery of health care to women and their families. Funding: Brigham Young University Office of Graduate Studies Graduate Mentoring Award; Kennedy Center for International Studies Graduate Fellowship.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural Perceptions of Childbirth in the Netherlandsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157817-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cultural Perceptions of Childbirth in the Netherlands</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Taralyn, RN, BS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Pediatric RN and FNP Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">802 Wymount, Provo, UT, 84604, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-301-1218</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">taralynjohnson@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lynn Clark Callister, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe the meaning of childbirth to women giving birth at home in The Netherlands. This study builds on two decades of cross cultural studies with childbearing women. Background: The Netherlands has a unique approach to health care for childbearing families, with a home birth rate of about 30%. Outcomes associated with giving birth at home with a midwife caregiver translates into low infant and maternal morbidity and mortality rates, as well as few interventions. Childbearing is seen as a healthy process by Dutch health care providers, insurance programs, and the government. Research has described giving birth in the Netherlands from a sociological perspective (DeVries, 2004), but no research published in English could be found describing the meaning of childbirth to Dutch women having home births. Method: Following IRB approval and informed consent, fourteen women who had given birth unmedicated at home in the Netherlands in the previous year receiving health care at the Voorburg Midwifery Clinic (a suburb of The Hague) were interviewed. Audiotaped interviews were transcribed and data analyzed as appropriate for phenomenological inquiry. Trustworthiness of the data was ensured by keeping a journal of impressions, keeping an audit trail, and conducting member checks electronically with five of the women who participated in the study. <br/>Results: Women who had previously experienced a hospital birth were very positive about giving birth at home within a calm, peaceful environment surrounded by loved ones with a supportive midwife-caregiver. They spoke of working with the pain as a normal expected part of the process of laboring and giving birth, &quot;[Labor] was very strong, intense, painful. You really get to know your spirit more.&quot; Women expressed a sense of self actualization, &quot;I did it! I succeeded! I am capable of doing such a thing and I am capable of being calm during the process. I felt so in touch with myself.&quot; Meaning was articulated as these women recalled the moment of birth, &quot;Seeing her little face, I'll never forget that. I remember being ecstatic, very happy and very powerful. You feel you are capable of doing almost anything.&quot; Implications for Clinical Practice: This research increases understanding of health care delivery systems globally to help inform policy making and the design of health care, including more judicious use of technology and evidence based practice. Findings can be utilized to increase the cultural competence of nurses as descriptive data was generated about women's perspectives and beliefs about childbearing (Callister, 2004). Increased cultural awareness will contribute to continuous quality improvement in the delivery of health care to women and their families. Funding: Brigham Young University Office of Graduate Studies Graduate Mentoring Award; Kennedy Center for International Studies Graduate Fellowship.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:13:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:13:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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