2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157819
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rural and Urban Native American Students Attending a Nursing Institute
Abstract:
Rural and Urban Native American Students Attending a Nursing Institute
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Katz, Janet, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:923 W. 24th, Spokane, WA, 99203, USA
Contact Telephone:509-324-7274
Purpose/Aims: This paper compares the results of surveys from 2004 (presented at WIN 2005) and 2005 to evaluate differences between rural and urban Native American high school students' perceptions of nursing after attending a Summer Nursing Institute. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: This study was guided by an educational research model developed by Native American and Alaska Natives (NA/AN) that calls for effectively implementing and evaluating programs serving NA/AN students. A culturally appropriate instrument to determine Native American high school student's perceptions of nursing was developed and tested in 2004. The survey was repeated in 2005 to students, many of whom were from urban rather than rural settings. Methods: Thirty-eight high school students (17 in 2004 and 21 in 2005) enrolled in 15 Tribes participated in the study. The Institute was a six-day residency program located in the Inland Northwest. The purposes of the Institute were to provide students with: 1. culturally appropriate education concerning personal health and Native American culture, 2. interactions with Native American nurse role models, and 3. support and encouragement in preparing for college and nursing. A 55-item investigator constructed survey included 33 scaled (5-point Likert) and 22 dichotomous items. The survey was administered to all 38 students before and after the Institute. The 21 participants from 2005 were interviewed for a phenomological study and to prepare a method for tracking students over time. Interviews were analyzed by 2 independent consultants, one a Native American Nursing assistant professor from a different institution. Results: Survey reliability estimates (Cronbach's alpha) were.72 and .85 for the pre-and post-tests in 2004 and .63 and .69 in 2005. There were significant differences between the 2004 (13 rural and 4 urban students) and those in 2005 (11 rural and 10 urban). Differences were seen in reasons for becoming a nurse, views of the benefits of being a nurse, and reasons to choose or not choose nursing. Interviews revealed themes including the ability to make money, work in a variety of settings, and helping people. All students interviewed planned to attend college and the primary barriers were perceived to be finances and the possibility of leaving home. The latter concern was more pronounced for the rural than the urban students. In developing a method for tracking students over time, students identified family and community members who could be contacted if their primary contact information did not work. Implications: The pilot study showed differences in urban and rural student's views of nursing and reasons to choose a nursing career. Findings provide evidence that rural and urban Native American students have unique concerns that need to be addressed. Understanding the complexity of culture and its influences on students contributes to providing effective education for Native American students. Funding: This study was funded through Group Health Community Foundation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRural and Urban Native American Students Attending a Nursing Instituteen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157819-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Rural and Urban Native American Students Attending a Nursing Institute</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Katz, Janet, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">923 W. 24th, Spokane, WA, 99203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">509-324-7274</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jkatz@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: This paper compares the results of surveys from 2004 (presented at WIN 2005) and 2005 to evaluate differences between rural and urban Native American high school students' perceptions of nursing after attending a Summer Nursing Institute. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: This study was guided by an educational research model developed by Native American and Alaska Natives (NA/AN) that calls for effectively implementing and evaluating programs serving NA/AN students. A culturally appropriate instrument to determine Native American high school student's perceptions of nursing was developed and tested in 2004. The survey was repeated in 2005 to students, many of whom were from urban rather than rural settings. Methods: Thirty-eight high school students (17 in 2004 and 21 in 2005) enrolled in 15 Tribes participated in the study. The Institute was a six-day residency program located in the Inland Northwest. The purposes of the Institute were to provide students with: 1. culturally appropriate education concerning personal health and Native American culture, 2. interactions with Native American nurse role models, and 3. support and encouragement in preparing for college and nursing. A 55-item investigator constructed survey included 33 scaled (5-point Likert) and 22 dichotomous items. The survey was administered to all 38 students before and after the Institute. The 21 participants from 2005 were interviewed for a phenomological study and to prepare a method for tracking students over time. Interviews were analyzed by 2 independent consultants, one a Native American Nursing assistant professor from a different institution. Results: Survey reliability estimates (Cronbach's alpha) were.72 and .85 for the pre-and post-tests in 2004 and .63 and .69 in 2005. There were significant differences between the 2004 (13 rural and 4 urban students) and those in 2005 (11 rural and 10 urban). Differences were seen in reasons for becoming a nurse, views of the benefits of being a nurse, and reasons to choose or not choose nursing. Interviews revealed themes including the ability to make money, work in a variety of settings, and helping people. All students interviewed planned to attend college and the primary barriers were perceived to be finances and the possibility of leaving home. The latter concern was more pronounced for the rural than the urban students. In developing a method for tracking students over time, students identified family and community members who could be contacted if their primary contact information did not work. Implications: The pilot study showed differences in urban and rural student's views of nursing and reasons to choose a nursing career. Findings provide evidence that rural and urban Native American students have unique concerns that need to be addressed. Understanding the complexity of culture and its influences on students contributes to providing effective education for Native American students. Funding: This study was funded through Group Health Community Foundation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:14:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:14:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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