2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157820
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Heart Rate Variability, eNO & Nocturnal Asthma Symptoms
Abstract:
Heart Rate Variability, eNO & Nocturnal Asthma Symptoms
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Kieckhefer, Gail, PhD, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Professor
Contact Address:3211 NW 68th, Seattle, WA, 98117, USA
Contact Telephone:206-543-8237
Co-Authors:Robert Burr, PhD; and Martha J. Lentz, PhD, RN
Background: Asthma is a complex condition with both inflammatory and autonomic nervous system alterations proposed as the underlying mechanism for symptom generation. Unknown is if differing levels or types of nocturnal asthma symptoms are associated with differing levels of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) and heart rate variability (HRV). This study examines the differences of a measure of inflammation, eNO levels, and autonomic nervous system, HRV measures, among children without asthma and with high or low frequency of parental report of nocturnal asthma symptoms. Methods: Children with asthma (n=10) and without asthma (n=19) aged 9-11 years were recruited using flyers posted in the community and word of mouth. Children were screened to have been free of colds or flu for the preceding two weeks. On screening parents reported the frequency the child had experienced asthma symptoms of coughing, wheezing or chest tightness. High symptom children were reported to experience symptoms more than once a week. All children then slept in a sleep laboratory for two nights with continuous heart rate recording using a modified lead II with a sampling rate of 200 s/s. The natural logarithm of the time series power/variance in high frequency band (0.15 < f < 0.40 Hz) of the HRV Fourier spectrum (averaged over all the artifact-free and ectopy-free five minute blocks of ECG-derived R-R intervals during the sleep period) was used as an index of nocturnal cardiac parasympathetic modulation (HRVPM). Samples for eNO were collected four times during the night in mylar balloons and analyzed using a Seivers (Boulder, CO) chemiluminescence analyzer in parts per billion (ppb). The median of each night's values was used in analysis. General linear model was used for analysis. Results: HRVPM was significantly (p=.01) higher 8.55 +.380 in the children with reported high frequency of asthma symptoms (HiSx; n=3), lowest 7.47 +.657 in children with low reported frequency of asthma symptoms (LoSx; n=7) and intermediate 7.90 +.385 in children without asthma (NoA; n=19). The groups differed significantly (p=.001) on median level of eNO with the NoA group having the lowest values of 9.76 + 4.66 ppb, and LoSx had the highest level at 25.57 + 14.35 ppb and the HiSx were intermediate at 17.83 + 8.08 ppb. Implications: Levels of eNO were significantly higher in children with asthma than children without asthma supporting the conclusion that asthma is associated with this marker of inflammation. The difference of higher level of eNO and lower parasympathetic modulation being associated with fewer nights of reported asthma symptoms and moderate eNO and higher parasympathetic modulation being associated with more nights of reported asthma symptoms suggests that there may be subtypes of asthma. These data are from a small sample and require further study with larger numbers of children having nighttime asthma symptoms.
Supported by NINR R01 NR08238 and P30 NR04001.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHeart Rate Variability, eNO & Nocturnal Asthma Symptomsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157820-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Heart Rate Variability, eNO &amp; Nocturnal Asthma Symptoms</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kieckhefer, Gail, PhD, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3211 NW 68th, Seattle, WA, 98117, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-543-8237</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gailmk@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Robert Burr, PhD; and Martha J. Lentz, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Asthma is a complex condition with both inflammatory and autonomic nervous system alterations proposed as the underlying mechanism for symptom generation. Unknown is if differing levels or types of nocturnal asthma symptoms are associated with differing levels of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) and heart rate variability (HRV). This study examines the differences of a measure of inflammation, eNO levels, and autonomic nervous system, HRV measures, among children without asthma and with high or low frequency of parental report of nocturnal asthma symptoms. Methods: Children with asthma (n=10) and without asthma (n=19) aged 9-11 years were recruited using flyers posted in the community and word of mouth. Children were screened to have been free of colds or flu for the preceding two weeks. On screening parents reported the frequency the child had experienced asthma symptoms of coughing, wheezing or chest tightness. High symptom children were reported to experience symptoms more than once a week. All children then slept in a sleep laboratory for two nights with continuous heart rate recording using a modified lead II with a sampling rate of 200 s/s. The natural logarithm of the time series power/variance in high frequency band (0.15 &lt; f &lt; 0.40 Hz) of the HRV Fourier spectrum (averaged over all the artifact-free and ectopy-free five minute blocks of ECG-derived R-R intervals during the sleep period) was used as an index of nocturnal cardiac parasympathetic modulation (HRVPM). Samples for eNO were collected four times during the night in mylar balloons and analyzed using a Seivers (Boulder, CO) chemiluminescence analyzer in parts per billion (ppb). The median of each night's values was used in analysis. General linear model was used for analysis. Results: HRVPM was significantly (p=.01) higher 8.55 +.380 in the children with reported high frequency of asthma symptoms (HiSx; n=3), lowest 7.47 +.657 in children with low reported frequency of asthma symptoms (LoSx; n=7) and intermediate 7.90 +.385 in children without asthma (NoA; n=19). The groups differed significantly (p=.001) on median level of eNO with the NoA group having the lowest values of 9.76 + 4.66 ppb, and LoSx had the highest level at 25.57 + 14.35 ppb and the HiSx were intermediate at 17.83 + 8.08 ppb. Implications: Levels of eNO were significantly higher in children with asthma than children without asthma supporting the conclusion that asthma is associated with this marker of inflammation. The difference of higher level of eNO and lower parasympathetic modulation being associated with fewer nights of reported asthma symptoms and moderate eNO and higher parasympathetic modulation being associated with more nights of reported asthma symptoms suggests that there may be subtypes of asthma. These data are from a small sample and require further study with larger numbers of children having nighttime asthma symptoms. <br/>Supported by NINR R01 NR08238 and P30 NR04001.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:14:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:14:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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