2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157823
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predicting Children's Adaptation to Childhood Chronic Illness
Abstract:
Predicting Children's Adaptation to Childhood Chronic Illness
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Knafl, Kathleen, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Title:Sr Assoc Dean for Research & Faculty Affairs
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3455 SW US Veterans Hospital Road, Portland, OR, 97239, USA
Contact Telephone:503-494-4288
Co-Authors:George Knafl, PhD; Janet Deatrick, RN, PhD, FAAN; Agatha Gallo, RN, PhD, FAAN; and Margaret Grey, RN, PhD, FAAN
Studies consistently have shown that although most children with chronic conditions are well adjusted, as a group they are at increased risk for emotional and behavioral problems. Thus, researchers are challenged to identify variables associated with healthy adaptation. In order to develop interventions that support healthy adaptation in children with chronic conditions, researchers must first understand what variables contribute to healthy adaptation and what variables put children at risk for poor outcomes. The purpose of this analysis was to examine the relationship between child functional status, family functioning, selected demographic variables, and child psychosocial adaptation to a chronic condition.
The report is based on data from 205 parents (149 families) in which a child between the ages of 2-18 years had a chronic physical condition. Data were collected through telephone interviews with parents from the Midwest, Middle Atlantic, and New England states. Parents provided demographic information and completed measures of the child's functional status (Functional Status Measure II - FSII), family functioning (Family Assessment Device - FAD), and child adaptation (Eyeberg Child Behavior Inventory - ECBI). The analysis addressed the relationship between child and family functioning and child adaptation to a chronic condition, differences in child adaptation and functioning in one and two-parent families, and extent to which parents in two-parent families had shared views of the child and family life. Mixed modeling was used to account for intra-familial correlations in families in which there were two parents. Parents' assessments of child adaptation (ECBI), child functional status (FSM), and family functioning (FAD) were strongly correlated, and were not significantly different for mothers and fathers or for 1-parent and 2-parent families. Parents' assessments of their child's adaptation were strongly related to their assessments of their child's functional status and their family's functioning (p<0.01). As expected, better levels of adaptation were related to better levels of functional status and better family functioning. Child's age, but not gender was related to adaptation, with older children demonstrating better adaptation. The study supports the importance of targeting both child and family functioning when developing interventions to enhance child adaptation to a chronic condition.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredicting Children's Adaptation to Childhood Chronic Illnessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157823-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predicting Children's Adaptation to Childhood Chronic Illness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Knafl, Kathleen, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Sr Assoc Dean for Research &amp; Faculty Affairs</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3455 SW US Veterans Hospital Road, Portland, OR, 97239, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">503-494-4288</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">knaflk@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">George Knafl, PhD; Janet Deatrick, RN, PhD, FAAN; Agatha Gallo, RN, PhD, FAAN; and Margaret Grey, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Studies consistently have shown that although most children with chronic conditions are well adjusted, as a group they are at increased risk for emotional and behavioral problems. Thus, researchers are challenged to identify variables associated with healthy adaptation. In order to develop interventions that support healthy adaptation in children with chronic conditions, researchers must first understand what variables contribute to healthy adaptation and what variables put children at risk for poor outcomes. The purpose of this analysis was to examine the relationship between child functional status, family functioning, selected demographic variables, and child psychosocial adaptation to a chronic condition. <br/>The report is based on data from 205 parents (149 families) in which a child between the ages of 2-18 years had a chronic physical condition. Data were collected through telephone interviews with parents from the Midwest, Middle Atlantic, and New England states. Parents provided demographic information and completed measures of the child's functional status (Functional Status Measure II - FSII), family functioning (Family Assessment Device - FAD), and child adaptation (Eyeberg Child Behavior Inventory - ECBI). The analysis addressed the relationship between child and family functioning and child adaptation to a chronic condition, differences in child adaptation and functioning in one and two-parent families, and extent to which parents in two-parent families had shared views of the child and family life. Mixed modeling was used to account for intra-familial correlations in families in which there were two parents. Parents' assessments of child adaptation (ECBI), child functional status (FSM), and family functioning (FAD) were strongly correlated, and were not significantly different for mothers and fathers or for 1-parent and 2-parent families. Parents' assessments of their child's adaptation were strongly related to their assessments of their child's functional status and their family's functioning (p&lt;0.01). As expected, better levels of adaptation were related to better levels of functional status and better family functioning. Child's age, but not gender was related to adaptation, with older children demonstrating better adaptation. The study supports the importance of targeting both child and family functioning when developing interventions to enhance child adaptation to a chronic condition.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:14:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:14:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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