2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157825
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Methylmercury Risk and Awareness in American Indian Women: A Pilot Study
Abstract:
Methylmercury Risk and Awareness in American Indian Women: A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Kuntz, Sandra, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:420 Stephens Avenue, Missoula, MT, 59801, USA
Contact Telephone:406-243-2551
Co-Authors:Wade G. Hill, PhD, RN, CNS; Susan A. King, PhD; Jeff W. Linkenbach, EdD; and Gary M. Lande, MD
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of the proposed study is to adapt an existing instrument (Anderson, 2004) and explore culturally appropriate methods to assess risk for methylmercury exposure in American Indian women of childbearing age living on rural reservations. In addition to risk for exposure, the adapted questionnaire will assess preferred risk communication modes among the target population. The specific aims of the project are to: (a) review the Montana data collected through the Anderson (2004) study (data available from the author and the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services) to better understand the risk characterization for American Indian populations, (b) explore fish advisory messages and risk communication strategies currently in place on rural reservations in Montana, (c) evaluate, adapt, and modify the methods used in the Anderson study and develop a culturally sensitive, participatory approach to measure risk for exposure and preferred risk communication messages for American Indian women enrolled in tribal Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) programs in the State of Montana, and (d) pilot the questionnaire and methods on one American Indian Reservation in the State of Montana. Methods: This study will reanalyze the Anderson (2004) dataset for Montana (n=212); explore fish advisory messages of the seven Montana reservations by phone survey; evaluate, adapt, and modify the methods of the (Anderson, 2004) survey to develop a culturally sensitive instrument; and, administer the adapted instrument on one reservation WIC clinic with a sample size of between 60-200. Data from the questionnaires will be coded and entered into SPSS and include descriptive analysis, chi square and t-test to examine differences and explore trends. Outcomes: The premise of this study is that current modes of risk communication about the dangers of eating fish contaminated with methylmercury are insufficient to protect public health and prevent chronic disease. Because most states including Montana rely on fish consumption warnings distributed through fishing license sales, the most vulnerable populations (pregnant women) are not targeted with these messages. Implications: Risk, awareness, and potential exposure of American Indian women to methylmercury through fish consumption is unknown. This study will explore potential vulnerability as well as preferred risk communication modes among the target population. Funding: NIH/NINR, (1P20NR07790-01), Center for Research on Chronic Health Conditions in Rural Dwellers, Montana State University-Bozeman College of Nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMethylmercury Risk and Awareness in American Indian Women: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157825-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Methylmercury Risk and Awareness in American Indian Women: A Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kuntz, Sandra, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">420 Stephens Avenue, Missoula, MT, 59801, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-243-2551</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">skuntz@montana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Wade G. Hill, PhD, RN, CNS; Susan A. King, PhD; Jeff W. Linkenbach, EdD; and Gary M. Lande, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of the proposed study is to adapt an existing instrument (Anderson, 2004) and explore culturally appropriate methods to assess risk for methylmercury exposure in American Indian women of childbearing age living on rural reservations. In addition to risk for exposure, the adapted questionnaire will assess preferred risk communication modes among the target population. The specific aims of the project are to: (a) review the Montana data collected through the Anderson (2004) study (data available from the author and the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services) to better understand the risk characterization for American Indian populations, (b) explore fish advisory messages and risk communication strategies currently in place on rural reservations in Montana, (c) evaluate, adapt, and modify the methods used in the Anderson study and develop a culturally sensitive, participatory approach to measure risk for exposure and preferred risk communication messages for American Indian women enrolled in tribal Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) programs in the State of Montana, and (d) pilot the questionnaire and methods on one American Indian Reservation in the State of Montana. Methods: This study will reanalyze the Anderson (2004) dataset for Montana (n=212); explore fish advisory messages of the seven Montana reservations by phone survey; evaluate, adapt, and modify the methods of the (Anderson, 2004) survey to develop a culturally sensitive instrument; and, administer the adapted instrument on one reservation WIC clinic with a sample size of between 60-200. Data from the questionnaires will be coded and entered into SPSS and include descriptive analysis, chi square and t-test to examine differences and explore trends. Outcomes: The premise of this study is that current modes of risk communication about the dangers of eating fish contaminated with methylmercury are insufficient to protect public health and prevent chronic disease. Because most states including Montana rely on fish consumption warnings distributed through fishing license sales, the most vulnerable populations (pregnant women) are not targeted with these messages. Implications: Risk, awareness, and potential exposure of American Indian women to methylmercury through fish consumption is unknown. This study will explore potential vulnerability as well as preferred risk communication modes among the target population. Funding: NIH/NINR, (1P20NR07790-01), Center for Research on Chronic Health Conditions in Rural Dwellers, Montana State University-Bozeman College of Nursing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:14:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:14:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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