2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157826
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Overview: Disaster: All-Hazard Rural Readiness and Response
Abstract:
Overview: Disaster: All-Hazard Rural Readiness and Response
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Kuntz, Sandra, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:420 Stephens Avenue, Missoula, MT, 59801, USA
Contact Telephone:406-243-2551
Events of the new millennium including threats of bioterrorism and natural environmental and weather-related disasters exposed the detritus condition of the public health infrastructure. Vulnerability awareness subsequent to the sarin gas release in a Japanese subway in 1995 precipitated the pre 9-11 funding streams including the Nunn-Lugar-Domenici Domestic Preparedness Program. Initial funding focused on urban centers, potential overt events, and was directed by the Department of Defense and Department of Justice. After 9-11 and the covert anthrax events, the woeful state of the public health infrastructure came into full view. In 2002 the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act (Public Law 107-88) began to address Healthy People 2010, "ensure that federal, tribal, state, and local health agencies have the infrastructure to provide essential public health services effectively," through funding distributed by the Department of Health and Human Services. Although initially overlooked during the pre-9-11 preparedness awards, three types of funding to improve workforce capacity and strengthen local public health and hospital infrastructure eventually reached rural/frontier states like Montana from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Public Health Emergency Preparedness Program; the Health Resources and Services Administration National Bioterrorism Hospital Preparedness Program; and the Health Resources and Services Administration Curriculum Development/Continuing Education Programs for Health Care Providers. The investigators of this symposium present the results of four rural disaster readiness and response studies conducted to measure both progress and anticipated need including public health preparedness, hospital/community response, future workforce readiness, and a system for recruitment and training of rural disaster nurse volunteers in Montana. The first study measured public health preparedness capacity development of small, medium, and large counties in Montana during a two year period (2002-2004). The second study examines an actual event that tested rural emergency response and hospital readiness to receive disaster victims. The third study identifies the final results of a two year project to prepare the coming workforce for bioterrorism and other public health emergencies through university-based curriculum development. The fourth study provides a description of the Montana Nurse Alert System and the characteristics of the first cohort of nurses who volunteered for training and service (basic preparedness) in the event of a local, regional, or statewide disaster. Frontier/rural initiatives often require collaboration in order to maximize limited funding (fiscal resources) and available responders (human resources). This symposium will highlight the possible creative use of resources to protect citizens in rural areas exposed to all-hazard disaster. Partially funded by CDC Cooperative Agreement Program 99051 Emergency Supplement and HRSA BTCDP CFDA 93.996.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOverview: Disaster: All-Hazard Rural Readiness and Responseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157826-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Overview: Disaster: All-Hazard Rural Readiness and Response</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kuntz, Sandra, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">420 Stephens Avenue, Missoula, MT, 59801, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-243-2551</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">skuntz@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Events of the new millennium including threats of bioterrorism and natural environmental and weather-related disasters exposed the detritus condition of the public health infrastructure. Vulnerability awareness subsequent to the sarin gas release in a Japanese subway in 1995 precipitated the pre 9-11 funding streams including the Nunn-Lugar-Domenici Domestic Preparedness Program. Initial funding focused on urban centers, potential overt events, and was directed by the Department of Defense and Department of Justice. After 9-11 and the covert anthrax events, the woeful state of the public health infrastructure came into full view. In 2002 the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act (Public Law 107-88) began to address Healthy People 2010, &quot;ensure that federal, tribal, state, and local health agencies have the infrastructure to provide essential public health services effectively,&quot; through funding distributed by the Department of Health and Human Services. Although initially overlooked during the pre-9-11 preparedness awards, three types of funding to improve workforce capacity and strengthen local public health and hospital infrastructure eventually reached rural/frontier states like Montana from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Public Health Emergency Preparedness Program; the Health Resources and Services Administration National Bioterrorism Hospital Preparedness Program; and the Health Resources and Services Administration Curriculum Development/Continuing Education Programs for Health Care Providers. The investigators of this symposium present the results of four rural disaster readiness and response studies conducted to measure both progress and anticipated need including public health preparedness, hospital/community response, future workforce readiness, and a system for recruitment and training of rural disaster nurse volunteers in Montana. The first study measured public health preparedness capacity development of small, medium, and large counties in Montana during a two year period (2002-2004). The second study examines an actual event that tested rural emergency response and hospital readiness to receive disaster victims. The third study identifies the final results of a two year project to prepare the coming workforce for bioterrorism and other public health emergencies through university-based curriculum development. The fourth study provides a description of the Montana Nurse Alert System and the characteristics of the first cohort of nurses who volunteered for training and service (basic preparedness) in the event of a local, regional, or statewide disaster. Frontier/rural initiatives often require collaboration in order to maximize limited funding (fiscal resources) and available responders (human resources). This symposium will highlight the possible creative use of resources to protect citizens in rural areas exposed to all-hazard disaster. Partially funded by CDC Cooperative Agreement Program 99051 Emergency Supplement and HRSA BTCDP CFDA 93.996.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:14:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:14:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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