2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157827
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measures of Local/Tribal Public Health Preparedness Progress 2002-2004
Abstract:
Measures of Local/Tribal Public Health Preparedness Progress 2002-2004
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Kuntz, Sandra, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:420 Stephens Avenue, Missoula, MT, 59801, USA
Contact Telephone:406-243-2551
Co-Authors:Jane Smilie, MPH; and Jifeng Wang, MS
Purpose/Aims: In 2002, county and tribal public health agencies began developing population-based readiness and response infrastructure, incrementally, through a process of deliverables and subcontracts with Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS). Based on the CDC National Critical Capacity Benchmarks, the deliverables represented specific components of infrastructure that would provide early assurance of not only current capacity but also future capability to respond to a public health emergency. Does capacity (infrastructure components such as 24/7 communication systems and surveillance protocols) improve local agency capability (performance during an actual event)? The answer to this question lies in the future as simulations, tabletop exercises, and actual events test system improvements put in place during the 2002-2004 CDC and HRSA funding years. The primary aims of this study were to (a) measure change in local capacity between 2002 and 2004 using the CDC Critical Capacity/Benchmarks (2002) and the Emergency Preparedness Scoring Matrix (EPSM) (Kuntz, Smilie, & Wang, 2003) and (b) determine the prevalence or absence of specific indicators of preparedness. Methods: An assessment instrument, the EPSM, designed and based on the 2002 Capacity Assessment established a continuous measure of preparedness. Local jurisdictions (counties and tribes) completed the 2002 survey and the follow-up survey in 2004 by self report. An index of preparedness (the continuous measure) was developed based on 50 points with 50 indicating basic critical capacities of preparedness in areas including planning and readiness; surveillance and epidemiology; laboratory capacity; communications/technology; risk communication; and education and training. Results: Tabulation of statewide results indicates local jurisdictions doubled their capacity and improved to approximately 50% of basic preparedness capacity between 2002 and 2004. The 2002 survey revealed scores as low as 3.33 and as high as 33.33/50 (n=53). Change in the 2004 follow-up survey ranged from 15.11-44.74 (n=54). Analysis of the individual county (small and tribes <10,000; medium 10,000-20,000; and large >20,000) data is expected to help guide counties and tribes toward continuous and incremental system improvement as survey findings are examined by local providers.
Implications: Statewide summary results have been used to gauge progress of the 2002-2004 funded mandate and provide a report of activities to the Montana state legislature. The next stage of data analysis, the individual county/tribe reports, will provide guidance to local agencies that will be expected to utilize improved capacity during the next stage of funding which will include performance (capability) initiatives. This progress report will be used to bolster work yet to be accomplished and complement specific local achievements. Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Cooperative Agreement Program 99051.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasures of Local/Tribal Public Health Preparedness Progress 2002-2004en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157827-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measures of Local/Tribal Public Health Preparedness Progress 2002-2004</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kuntz, Sandra, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">420 Stephens Avenue, Missoula, MT, 59801, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-243-2551</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">skuntz@montana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jane Smilie, MPH; and Jifeng Wang, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: In 2002, county and tribal public health agencies began developing population-based readiness and response infrastructure, incrementally, through a process of deliverables and subcontracts with Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS). Based on the CDC National Critical Capacity Benchmarks, the deliverables represented specific components of infrastructure that would provide early assurance of not only current capacity but also future capability to respond to a public health emergency. Does capacity (infrastructure components such as 24/7 communication systems and surveillance protocols) improve local agency capability (performance during an actual event)? The answer to this question lies in the future as simulations, tabletop exercises, and actual events test system improvements put in place during the 2002-2004 CDC and HRSA funding years. The primary aims of this study were to (a) measure change in local capacity between 2002 and 2004 using the CDC Critical Capacity/Benchmarks (2002) and the Emergency Preparedness Scoring Matrix (EPSM) (Kuntz, Smilie, &amp; Wang, 2003) and (b) determine the prevalence or absence of specific indicators of preparedness. Methods: An assessment instrument, the EPSM, designed and based on the 2002 Capacity Assessment established a continuous measure of preparedness. Local jurisdictions (counties and tribes) completed the 2002 survey and the follow-up survey in 2004 by self report. An index of preparedness (the continuous measure) was developed based on 50 points with 50 indicating basic critical capacities of preparedness in areas including planning and readiness; surveillance and epidemiology; laboratory capacity; communications/technology; risk communication; and education and training. Results: Tabulation of statewide results indicates local jurisdictions doubled their capacity and improved to approximately 50% of basic preparedness capacity between 2002 and 2004. The 2002 survey revealed scores as low as 3.33 and as high as 33.33/50 (n=53). Change in the 2004 follow-up survey ranged from 15.11-44.74 (n=54). Analysis of the individual county (small and tribes &lt;10,000; medium 10,000-20,000; and large &gt;20,000) data is expected to help guide counties and tribes toward continuous and incremental system improvement as survey findings are examined by local providers. <br/>Implications: Statewide summary results have been used to gauge progress of the 2002-2004 funded mandate and provide a report of activities to the Montana state legislature. The next stage of data analysis, the individual county/tribe reports, will provide guidance to local agencies that will be expected to utilize improved capacity during the next stage of funding which will include performance (capability) initiatives. This progress report will be used to bolster work yet to be accomplished and complement specific local achievements. Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Cooperative Agreement Program 99051.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:14:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:14:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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