2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157829
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Uncertainty on Depression in Patients Undergoing Kidney Dialysis
Abstract:
Effect of Uncertainty on Depression in Patients Undergoing Kidney Dialysis
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lee, Heeyoung, PhC, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:4200 Mary Gates Memorial Dr NE #R229, Seattle, WA, 98105, USA
Contact Telephone:206-522-5199
Co-Authors:Karen G. Schepp, PhD, APRN, BC and Youngmi Jung, PhD, RN
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test a hypothesized relationship between experiences of uncertainty and depression in a sample with subjects undergoing renal replacement therapy (RRT) in Korea. Background: It is estimated that in Korea in 2002, the total number of patients undergoing hemodialysis therapy was approximately 20,000 and peritoneal dialysis was roughly 5,700. Despite its therapeutic efficacy, patients undergoing dialysis commonly experience inherent uncertainty in their life, which could arise from the prospect of premature death. In turn, exacerbation of symptoms increases depression through heightened uncertainty in patients with chronic illness. Depression is the most common psychological disorder in patients undergoing RRT. In spite of the positive relationship between uncertainty and depression, there is little data portraying the relationship in the population with RRT. It is important, therefore, to decipher the relationship between uncertainty and depression in this population. Methods: This is cross-sectional data. The 104 subjects were recruited from the three clinics for HD and one pharmaceutical company where patients with CAPD registered in Seoul, Korea. Path analysis was used in the sample to examine the relationship between depression and experiences of uncertainty, including direct social support, indirect social support, and demographic variables.
Results: Of 104 total participants, males comprised 57.7% (n=60) and females 42.3% (n=44). Fifty-six percent of participants received HD, while 44 percent received CAPD. A mean age was 41 years (SD=11.68). A mean length of the illness was 50.8 months (SD=42.80). Six and one-fifth percent variance in uncertainty is predicted by direct social support (B=-.267). Patients who directly receive social support perceive less uncertainty. Forty-six and one-fifth percent variance in depression is predicted by three variables: direct social support (B= -.517), economic status (B= .299), and number of admissions (B= .275). Patients who get more direct social support perceive themselves as less depressive, whereas patients of high economic status who experience frequent hospitalizations perceive themselves as more depressive. Experiences of uncertainty could not predict depression. Implications: The effectiveness of social support to relieve experiences of uncertainty and consequently depression can be shown in this study. Moreover, depression in this population can be predicted by direct social support, economic status, and frequency of admission. Results of this study can extend knowledge to develop intervention programs for this population. Furthermore, the study is needed to investigate the relationship between depression and experiences of uncertainty with time covariates, as well as to find the factors influencing depression in patients with CRF.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Uncertainty on Depression in Patients Undergoing Kidney Dialysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157829-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Uncertainty on Depression in Patients Undergoing Kidney Dialysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Heeyoung, PhC, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4200 Mary Gates Memorial Dr NE #R229, Seattle, WA, 98105, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-522-5199</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">HL2@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen G. Schepp, PhD, APRN, BC and Youngmi Jung, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test a hypothesized relationship between experiences of uncertainty and depression in a sample with subjects undergoing renal replacement therapy (RRT) in Korea. Background: It is estimated that in Korea in 2002, the total number of patients undergoing hemodialysis therapy was approximately 20,000 and peritoneal dialysis was roughly 5,700. Despite its therapeutic efficacy, patients undergoing dialysis commonly experience inherent uncertainty in their life, which could arise from the prospect of premature death. In turn, exacerbation of symptoms increases depression through heightened uncertainty in patients with chronic illness. Depression is the most common psychological disorder in patients undergoing RRT. In spite of the positive relationship between uncertainty and depression, there is little data portraying the relationship in the population with RRT. It is important, therefore, to decipher the relationship between uncertainty and depression in this population. Methods: This is cross-sectional data. The 104 subjects were recruited from the three clinics for HD and one pharmaceutical company where patients with CAPD registered in Seoul, Korea. Path analysis was used in the sample to examine the relationship between depression and experiences of uncertainty, including direct social support, indirect social support, and demographic variables. <br/>Results: Of 104 total participants, males comprised 57.7% (n=60) and females 42.3% (n=44). Fifty-six percent of participants received HD, while 44 percent received CAPD. A mean age was 41 years (SD=11.68). A mean length of the illness was 50.8 months (SD=42.80). Six and one-fifth percent variance in uncertainty is predicted by direct social support (B=-.267). Patients who directly receive social support perceive less uncertainty. Forty-six and one-fifth percent variance in depression is predicted by three variables: direct social support (B= -.517), economic status (B= .299), and number of admissions (B= .275). Patients who get more direct social support perceive themselves as less depressive, whereas patients of high economic status who experience frequent hospitalizations perceive themselves as more depressive. Experiences of uncertainty could not predict depression. Implications: The effectiveness of social support to relieve experiences of uncertainty and consequently depression can be shown in this study. Moreover, depression in this population can be predicted by direct social support, economic status, and frequency of admission. Results of this study can extend knowledge to develop intervention programs for this population. Furthermore, the study is needed to investigate the relationship between depression and experiences of uncertainty with time covariates, as well as to find the factors influencing depression in patients with CRF.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:14:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:14:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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