2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157830
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Related Quality of Life Measurements in Venous Diseases
Abstract:
Health Related Quality of Life Measurements in Venous Diseases
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lee, Jung-Ah, MN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:1227 NE 143rd Street, #303B, Seattle, WA, 98125, USA
Contact Telephone:206-616-9861
Purposes/Aims: To explore the health related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments that have been used in venous diseases, and to evaluate the venous disease-specific questionnaires in psychometric properties including reliability, validity, and responsiveness. Background: Venous insufficiency resulted from varicose veins, leg ulcers, and post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) after deep vein thrombosis (DVT), is a chronic, debilitating disease with side effects that impact a person's daily function and quality of life, increasing burden for the health services and health costs for Western Society. Health related quality of life of the patients with chronic venous diseases should, therefore, be considered. However, HRQOL is not adequately captured by traditional clinical assessments. There has been few of disease-specific measures have been evaluated by psychometric properties. Methods: A systemic review was done using Medline, CINAHL, PsychINFO, ISI Web of Science, Medical Outcomes Trust, QOLID (Quality of Life Instruments Database), Google, and an academic library search program, "Finding Measurement Tools". The key words for search were a) "venous disease", inter-changeablely "varicose veins", "leg ulcers", or "post-thrombotic syndrome", b) "quality of life" or "health related quality of life", and c) "measurement", "questionnaire", or "instrument". Criteria for evaluation of disease-specific measurement were referred from the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Medical Outcomes Trust, defining eight key attributives of health status and quality of life instruments including the conceptual and measurement model, reliability, validity, responsiveness, interpretability, burden, alternative forms, and cultural and language adaptations. Results: Several validated generic measurements, including SF-36, the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), the EuroQol, the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP), or Health Utility Index have been often used to assess HRQOL in many studies. McGill Pain questionnaires and the Rotterdam symptom checklist additionally including four items for symptoms of thrombosis were used to measure pain and symptoms in legs due to ulcers, varicose veins, or thrombosis. Varying invalidated disease-specific instruments measuring quality of life for patients with leg ulcers or chronic venous insufficiency had been used in the past. Their limitations are in a) narrowly focusing on only a type of venous disease, b) unavailability in valid English version, and c) lack of generic quality of life components. Two disease-specific measurements including the Venous Insufficiency Epidemiologic and Economic Study of Quality-of-Life and Symptoms questionnaire (VEINES-QOL/Sym) and the Chronic Venous Insufficiency Questionnaire (CIVIQ) were developed and psychometrically well validated in Europe and Canada in the late 1990?s. In addition, recently the DVT Leg Symptom Index (DVT-LSI) was validated in a clinical trial performed in US. Implications: It is imminent and essential to measure quality of life with well validated measurement tools for those who are suffering from chronic venous diseases including varicose veins, leg ulcers, and PTS after DVT. Further prospective studies using large population in diverse cultures are needed to validate such disease-specific measurements. American English version of the CIVIQ needs to be validated.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Related Quality of Life Measurements in Venous Diseasesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157830-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Related Quality of Life Measurements in Venous Diseases</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Jung-Ah, MN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1227 NE 143rd Street, #303B, Seattle, WA, 98125, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-616-9861</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jalee71@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: To explore the health related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments that have been used in venous diseases, and to evaluate the venous disease-specific questionnaires in psychometric properties including reliability, validity, and responsiveness. Background: Venous insufficiency resulted from varicose veins, leg ulcers, and post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) after deep vein thrombosis (DVT), is a chronic, debilitating disease with side effects that impact a person's daily function and quality of life, increasing burden for the health services and health costs for Western Society. Health related quality of life of the patients with chronic venous diseases should, therefore, be considered. However, HRQOL is not adequately captured by traditional clinical assessments. There has been few of disease-specific measures have been evaluated by psychometric properties. Methods: A systemic review was done using Medline, CINAHL, PsychINFO, ISI Web of Science, Medical Outcomes Trust, QOLID (Quality of Life Instruments Database), Google, and an academic library search program, &quot;Finding Measurement Tools&quot;. The key words for search were a) &quot;venous disease&quot;, inter-changeablely &quot;varicose veins&quot;, &quot;leg ulcers&quot;, or &quot;post-thrombotic syndrome&quot;, b) &quot;quality of life&quot; or &quot;health related quality of life&quot;, and c) &quot;measurement&quot;, &quot;questionnaire&quot;, or &quot;instrument&quot;. Criteria for evaluation of disease-specific measurement were referred from the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Medical Outcomes Trust, defining eight key attributives of health status and quality of life instruments including the conceptual and measurement model, reliability, validity, responsiveness, interpretability, burden, alternative forms, and cultural and language adaptations. Results: Several validated generic measurements, including SF-36, the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), the EuroQol, the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP), or Health Utility Index have been often used to assess HRQOL in many studies. McGill Pain questionnaires and the Rotterdam symptom checklist additionally including four items for symptoms of thrombosis were used to measure pain and symptoms in legs due to ulcers, varicose veins, or thrombosis. Varying invalidated disease-specific instruments measuring quality of life for patients with leg ulcers or chronic venous insufficiency had been used in the past. Their limitations are in a) narrowly focusing on only a type of venous disease, b) unavailability in valid English version, and c) lack of generic quality of life components. Two disease-specific measurements including the Venous Insufficiency Epidemiologic and Economic Study of Quality-of-Life and Symptoms questionnaire (VEINES-QOL/Sym) and the Chronic Venous Insufficiency Questionnaire (CIVIQ) were developed and psychometrically well validated in Europe and Canada in the late 1990?s. In addition, recently the DVT Leg Symptom Index (DVT-LSI) was validated in a clinical trial performed in US. Implications: It is imminent and essential to measure quality of life with well validated measurement tools for those who are suffering from chronic venous diseases including varicose veins, leg ulcers, and PTS after DVT. Further prospective studies using large population in diverse cultures are needed to validate such disease-specific measurements. American English version of the CIVIQ needs to be validated.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:14:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:14:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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