2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157831
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Characteristics and Awareness of Blood Pressure Among Older Adults
Abstract:
Characteristics and Awareness of Blood Pressure Among Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lee, Young-Shin, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:San Diego State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:8885 Hoffing Avenue, San Diego, CA, 92123, USA
Contact Telephone:619-594-5385
Background: More than half of the elderly have high blood pressure. Consequently, the prevention and control of hypertension have become important issues in efforts to reduce the high risk of cardiovascular disease among older adults. Recently, researchers have emphasized the need for elderly individuals to remain aware of their blood pressure (BP) if they are above the optimal range. There is little information, however, on what elderly persons actually know about their BP, nor do we know much about the degree that elderly persons attempt to control their BP. Purpose: This study describes the characteristics and control of BP among older adults and assesses the degree that older adults are aware of their BP. In addition, the study determines the differences in perceived health status and general health motivation among four groups: those with (1) normal BP, (2) controlled BP with medication, (3) uncontrolled BP with medication, and (4) high BP with no treatment. Methods: For this study, 276 adults aged 60 to 75 years (68.8% women, 37% non-White) had two BP measurements and completed three self-report questionnaires (a 21-item Awareness of BP Questionnaire, Perceived Health Status, and the Health Self-Determinism Index). Findings: The mean BP was 140/77 mmHg. Half of the participants had high blood pressure over 140/90 mmHg, and 82% (n = 113) revealed isolated systolic hypertension.
Of the participants, 56% (n = 154) had taken anti-hypertensive medication, and only 44% controlled their BP under 140/90 mmHg.
Of the participants, 74% knew their BP level, and 32% with hypertension did not know their BP level. Only 45% knew that an elevated systolic BP constitutes hypertension. Fifty-three percent stated that systolic BP was "important," while 49% incorrectly believed that hypertension was a normal part of aging. Among the four BP-level groups, awareness of BP was not significantly different. Perceived health status and health self-determinism were significantly highest in those with normal BP and lowest in those with uncontrolled high blood pressure. Conclusions: The study reveals that more than half of older adults are not aware of the importance of systolic BP, and those with hypertension have less awareness of their BP condition than those with normal BP. This finding suggests that healthcare providers should educate the elderly in the meaning of BP characteristics and in the ways they can prevent and control high blood pressure. Funding: Supported by American Nurses Foundation Grant #2002101.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharacteristics and Awareness of Blood Pressure Among Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157831-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Characteristics and Awareness of Blood Pressure Among Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Young-Shin, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">San Diego State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">8885 Hoffing Avenue, San Diego, CA, 92123, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">619-594-5385</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ylee@mail.sdsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: More than half of the elderly have high blood pressure. Consequently, the prevention and control of hypertension have become important issues in efforts to reduce the high risk of cardiovascular disease among older adults. Recently, researchers have emphasized the need for elderly individuals to remain aware of their blood pressure (BP) if they are above the optimal range. There is little information, however, on what elderly persons actually know about their BP, nor do we know much about the degree that elderly persons attempt to control their BP. Purpose: This study describes the characteristics and control of BP among older adults and assesses the degree that older adults are aware of their BP. In addition, the study determines the differences in perceived health status and general health motivation among four groups: those with (1) normal BP, (2) controlled BP with medication, (3) uncontrolled BP with medication, and (4) high BP with no treatment. Methods: For this study, 276 adults aged 60 to 75 years (68.8% women, 37% non-White) had two BP measurements and completed three self-report questionnaires (a 21-item Awareness of BP Questionnaire, Perceived Health Status, and the Health Self-Determinism Index). Findings: The mean BP was 140/77 mmHg. Half of the participants had high blood pressure over 140/90 mmHg, and 82% (n = 113) revealed isolated systolic hypertension. <br/>Of the participants, 56% (n = 154) had taken anti-hypertensive medication, and only 44% controlled their BP under 140/90 mmHg. <br/>Of the participants, 74% knew their BP level, and 32% with hypertension did not know their BP level. Only 45% knew that an elevated systolic BP constitutes hypertension. Fifty-three percent stated that systolic BP was &quot;important,&quot; while 49% incorrectly believed that hypertension was a normal part of aging. Among the four BP-level groups, awareness of BP was not significantly different. Perceived health status and health self-determinism were significantly highest in those with normal BP and lowest in those with uncontrolled high blood pressure. Conclusions: The study reveals that more than half of older adults are not aware of the importance of systolic BP, and those with hypertension have less awareness of their BP condition than those with normal BP. This finding suggests that healthcare providers should educate the elderly in the meaning of BP characteristics and in the ways they can prevent and control high blood pressure. Funding: Supported by American Nurses Foundation Grant #2002101.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:14:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:14:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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