2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157833
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cervical Cancer Beliefs and Screening Among Chinese Immigrants
Abstract:
Cervical Cancer Beliefs and Screening Among Chinese Immigrants
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lee-Lin, Frances, RN, PhD(c), OCN, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3455 SW US Veterans Hospital Rd, SN-5N, Portland, OR, 97239-2941, USA
Contact Telephone:503- 494-3725
Purposes/Aims: 1) To assess and describe knowledge and beliefs of first generation Chinese American women aged 40 and older related to cervical cancer and Pap smear screening practice; and 2) To examine the association of demographic, knowledge and beliefs with cervical cancer and Pap smear screening practice. Background: Despite an overall decrease in cervical cancer (CC) deaths in the US attributed to regular Pap smear use, Asian women still have higher incidence (9.5 vs. 8.9 per 100,000) and death rates (2.8 vs. 2.6 per 100,000) of CC than Caucasians. Furthermore, more Asian women are diagnosed with CC at later stages compared to Caucasian women. Methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive study was guided by the Health Belief Model. The study explored Pap testing related knowledge, beliefs, and practices among 100 CAW in Portland, Oregon, through a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire was derived from two previous English-language questionnaires, which were combined, modified, translated, and pre-tested for this study sample. Results: The majority believed poor hygiene (82%) and using birth control pill for a long time (58%) could contribute to their risks of having CC. Only 42% of women knew that having HPV, having intercourse at an early age (41%), having multiple sexual partners (58%), and having sexual activity with a man who has multiple partners (60%) would increase CC risk. Almost a quarter of women (22%) believed that not sleeping with a man and menopause (20%) were reasons to not have a Pap smear. The majority (84%) reported they have had a Pap; only 68% reported that the last Pap was within 3 years (adherence).
Younger women were 0.93 times as likely as older women to report a Pap smear adherence. Those with insurance were 10 times more likely to ever have a Pap, and 5 times more likely to be adherent. Women reporting provider recommendation were 19 times more likely to ever have a Pap and more likely to be adherent. Women with higher knowledge were 1.5 times more likely to be adherent. Women with higher modesty scores were less likely to report having the test. Implications/Recommendations: Findings indicate a higher ever had Pap rate (84%) among these women than other Chinese studies; but the rate for Pap adherence (68%) remains low, indicating the importance of assessing adherence. Provider recommendation and health care access (especially insurance coverage) must be incorporated into interventions designed to increase screening, along with a focus on older women and cultural barriers such as modesty.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCervical Cancer Beliefs and Screening Among Chinese Immigrantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157833-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cervical Cancer Beliefs and Screening Among Chinese Immigrants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee-Lin, Frances, RN, PhD(c), OCN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3455 SW US Veterans Hospital Rd, SN-5N, Portland, OR, 97239-2941, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">503- 494-3725</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leelinf@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: 1) To assess and describe knowledge and beliefs of first generation Chinese American women aged 40 and older related to cervical cancer and Pap smear screening practice; and 2) To examine the association of demographic, knowledge and beliefs with cervical cancer and Pap smear screening practice. Background: Despite an overall decrease in cervical cancer (CC) deaths in the US attributed to regular Pap smear use, Asian women still have higher incidence (9.5 vs. 8.9 per 100,000) and death rates (2.8 vs. 2.6 per 100,000) of CC than Caucasians. Furthermore, more Asian women are diagnosed with CC at later stages compared to Caucasian women. Methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive study was guided by the Health Belief Model. The study explored Pap testing related knowledge, beliefs, and practices among 100 CAW in Portland, Oregon, through a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire was derived from two previous English-language questionnaires, which were combined, modified, translated, and pre-tested for this study sample. Results: The majority believed poor hygiene (82%) and using birth control pill for a long time (58%) could contribute to their risks of having CC. Only 42% of women knew that having HPV, having intercourse at an early age (41%), having multiple sexual partners (58%), and having sexual activity with a man who has multiple partners (60%) would increase CC risk. Almost a quarter of women (22%) believed that not sleeping with a man and menopause (20%) were reasons to not have a Pap smear. The majority (84%) reported they have had a Pap; only 68% reported that the last Pap was within 3 years (adherence). <br/>Younger women were 0.93 times as likely as older women to report a Pap smear adherence. Those with insurance were 10 times more likely to ever have a Pap, and 5 times more likely to be adherent. Women reporting provider recommendation were 19 times more likely to ever have a Pap and more likely to be adherent. Women with higher knowledge were 1.5 times more likely to be adherent. Women with higher modesty scores were less likely to report having the test. Implications/Recommendations: Findings indicate a higher ever had Pap rate (84%) among these women than other Chinese studies; but the rate for Pap adherence (68%) remains low, indicating the importance of assessing adherence. Provider recommendation and health care access (especially insurance coverage) must be incorporated into interventions designed to increase screening, along with a focus on older women and cultural barriers such as modesty.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:14:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:14:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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