2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157835
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determining Literacy Levels of Mothers in a Clinic Based Population
Abstract:
Determining Literacy Levels of Mothers in a Clinic Based Population
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lobo, Marie, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, MSCO9 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:505-272-2637
Co-Authors:Kelly Havig-Lipke, Mdand Emily Whitehead, MSN, RN
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe maternal literacy levels and compare two literacy assessment tools in a child health clinic in the Southeastern United States (US). Mothers of children ages birth to 6 years attending a university sponsored well-child clinic were asked to complete either the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE) or the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine to determine their reading abilities. The children in this clinic were enrolled in Reach Out and Read (ROR), a clinic based literacy program. Mothers were given a prescription to read to their children daily as a part of the program. Rationale: A major problem contributing to health disparities in the US is the inability of patients to read health education materials. Children who live in homes where parents have low literacy abilities are often not ready for school and do not stay on grade level. This is compounded by poverty and children being at a greater risk for social and cognitive delays and emotional problems. Understanding maternal literacy levels influences the types of health education materials and teaching which takes place during well-child visits.
Methods: Mothers, whose children were attending a university affiliated clinic implementing ROR were recruited to participate in a survey about literacy. The study was deemed exempt by the Institutional Review Board. Mothers were interviewed by trained research assistants using the standardized TABE or REALM and asked additional demographic information. RAs recorded the raw answers and the data were entered into SPSS. Results: 184 mothers, 80% African American, 14% Caucasian, 6% Hispanic and other ethnicities; with 78 female (43%) and 105 male children (57%) (including one set of twins) participated in the study. The mean score on the TABE (n=90) was 18.9 (sd = 5.3) or high school. The mean score of the REALM (n=94) was 56.4 (sd = 12.2) or 7-8th grade level. Although no significant differences in maternal age or education were found between the mothers who took the TABE when compared with mothers who took the REALM, the REALM identified a higher rate of lower literacy mothers in that group. Implications: There is a need to better understand the literacy levels of patients and families, as well as a need to implement a comprehensive evaluation of literacy assessment tools used in clinics. The TABE is used commonly by literacy associations to determine the need for literacy classes. It is shorter and less time consuming than the REALM, which made it attractive to use in clinic. However, the REALM identified a larger group of low literacy mothers. It is critical that staff identify literacy levels of their patients and families if health education materials are to be developed that are appropriate for the populations served. Supported in part by a grant from the University Research Committee, Medical University of South Carolina.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDetermining Literacy Levels of Mothers in a Clinic Based Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157835-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Determining Literacy Levels of Mothers in a Clinic Based Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lobo, Marie, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, MSCO9 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-272-2637</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mlobo@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kelly Havig-Lipke, Mdand Emily Whitehead, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe maternal literacy levels and compare two literacy assessment tools in a child health clinic in the Southeastern United States (US). Mothers of children ages birth to 6 years attending a university sponsored well-child clinic were asked to complete either the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE) or the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine to determine their reading abilities. The children in this clinic were enrolled in Reach Out and Read (ROR), a clinic based literacy program. Mothers were given a prescription to read to their children daily as a part of the program. Rationale: A major problem contributing to health disparities in the US is the inability of patients to read health education materials. Children who live in homes where parents have low literacy abilities are often not ready for school and do not stay on grade level. This is compounded by poverty and children being at a greater risk for social and cognitive delays and emotional problems. Understanding maternal literacy levels influences the types of health education materials and teaching which takes place during well-child visits. <br/>Methods: Mothers, whose children were attending a university affiliated clinic implementing ROR were recruited to participate in a survey about literacy. The study was deemed exempt by the Institutional Review Board. Mothers were interviewed by trained research assistants using the standardized TABE or REALM and asked additional demographic information. RAs recorded the raw answers and the data were entered into SPSS. Results: 184 mothers, 80% African American, 14% Caucasian, 6% Hispanic and other ethnicities; with 78 female (43%) and 105 male children (57%) (including one set of twins) participated in the study. The mean score on the TABE (n=90) was 18.9 (sd = 5.3) or high school. The mean score of the REALM (n=94) was 56.4 (sd = 12.2) or 7-8th grade level. Although no significant differences in maternal age or education were found between the mothers who took the TABE when compared with mothers who took the REALM, the REALM identified a higher rate of lower literacy mothers in that group. Implications: There is a need to better understand the literacy levels of patients and families, as well as a need to implement a comprehensive evaluation of literacy assessment tools used in clinics. The TABE is used commonly by literacy associations to determine the need for literacy classes. It is shorter and less time consuming than the REALM, which made it attractive to use in clinic. However, the REALM identified a larger group of low literacy mothers. It is critical that staff identify literacy levels of their patients and families if health education materials are to be developed that are appropriate for the populations served. Supported in part by a grant from the University Research Committee, Medical University of South Carolina.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:15:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:15:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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