2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157836
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hand Hygiene Adherence After a Multi-Modal Intervention
Abstract:
Hand Hygiene Adherence After a Multi-Modal Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Logan, Mary, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Alaska Native Medical Center
Title:CCU Staff
Contact Address:10675 Luliad Circle, Anchorage, AK, 99507, USA
Contact Telephone:907-786-4573
Co-Authors:Julie McNulty, RN, MSN and Karen Wainwright, MPH, RN, CCRP, CMC
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine rates of hand hygiene adherence and methicillin-resistant Staphyloccus aureus (MRSA) infection rates in an acute care setting before and after the introduction of evidence-based interventions to improve adherence. Multi-modal interventions included (a) developing a credible written guideline to clarify decision-making for contact isolation patients, (b) introducing a culturally appropriate patient education "Ask Your Provider" campaign, (c) developing active participation at the individual and institutional levels using performance gap assessment using "MRSA Graffiti," feedback, and formal staff education, and (d) developing unit-based opinion leaders.
Background: The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, the Institute of Medicine, and the Centers for Disease Control have all indicated prevention and control of nosocomial infections as a priority area for hospitals. Accumulating evidence suggests that appropriate screening, adherence with hand hygiene, and isolation practices are cost-effective interventions to limit the spread of MRSA and other pathogens. Hand hygiene adherence is notoriously poor in hospitals, and adherence rates at our facility were unknown. Effective multi-disciplinary programs are needed to improve adherence rates. Opinion leaders and patient education campaigns in particular are new methods that may improve adherence rates on a sustained basis. Method: A one-group pretest-post-test design was used. First, hand hygiene adherence and MRSA rates were measured for all staff, using direct covert observation, over 2 months on 7 units. Isolation procedures for staff and visitors in isolation rooms were also evaluated. Then the 4 interventions were introduced on the units, with opinion leaders utilized on only 4 of the 7 units, in order to specifically measure the effectiveness of this intervention. Then, during a 9-month post intervention measurement period (Dec. 2005 to August 2006), observations were conducted on the seven units to measure hand hygiene adherence, handrub usage rates, and MRSA rates by unit.
Results: Hand hygiene adherence rates over time will be analyzed for this study by comparing pre and post intervention adherence rates by unit, by discipline, by nurse staffing rates, by shift, using T-tests or repeated measures ANOVA. Comparisons of staffing rates and hand hygiene adherence will be made. Effectiveness of opinion leaders in sustaining hand hygiene adherence rates will be examined using ANOVA. Initial pre-intervention data show low rates of hand hygiene adherence, with specific problem areas identified for intervention. Implications: The hands of hospital staff remain the source of most nosocomial infection transmissions. An emphasis on hand hygiene adherence is the most important way to limit the spread of MRSA and other pathogens. The ripple effect of performing research in a shared governance structure creates synergies that multiply the effects. Funded by a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Arctic Investigations Program, Anchorage AK.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHand Hygiene Adherence After a Multi-Modal Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157836-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hand Hygiene Adherence After a Multi-Modal Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Logan, Mary, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Alaska Native Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">CCU Staff</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10675 Luliad Circle, Anchorage, AK, 99507, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">907-786-4573</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marylogan@uaa.alaska.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Julie McNulty, RN, MSN and Karen Wainwright, MPH, RN, CCRP, CMC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine rates of hand hygiene adherence and methicillin-resistant Staphyloccus aureus (MRSA) infection rates in an acute care setting before and after the introduction of evidence-based interventions to improve adherence. Multi-modal interventions included (a) developing a credible written guideline to clarify decision-making for contact isolation patients, (b) introducing a culturally appropriate patient education &quot;Ask Your Provider&quot; campaign, (c) developing active participation at the individual and institutional levels using performance gap assessment using &quot;MRSA Graffiti,&quot; feedback, and formal staff education, and (d) developing unit-based opinion leaders. <br/>Background: The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, the Institute of Medicine, and the Centers for Disease Control have all indicated prevention and control of nosocomial infections as a priority area for hospitals. Accumulating evidence suggests that appropriate screening, adherence with hand hygiene, and isolation practices are cost-effective interventions to limit the spread of MRSA and other pathogens. Hand hygiene adherence is notoriously poor in hospitals, and adherence rates at our facility were unknown. Effective multi-disciplinary programs are needed to improve adherence rates. Opinion leaders and patient education campaigns in particular are new methods that may improve adherence rates on a sustained basis. Method: A one-group pretest-post-test design was used. First, hand hygiene adherence and MRSA rates were measured for all staff, using direct covert observation, over 2 months on 7 units. Isolation procedures for staff and visitors in isolation rooms were also evaluated. Then the 4 interventions were introduced on the units, with opinion leaders utilized on only 4 of the 7 units, in order to specifically measure the effectiveness of this intervention. Then, during a 9-month post intervention measurement period (Dec. 2005 to August 2006), observations were conducted on the seven units to measure hand hygiene adherence, handrub usage rates, and MRSA rates by unit. <br/>Results: Hand hygiene adherence rates over time will be analyzed for this study by comparing pre and post intervention adherence rates by unit, by discipline, by nurse staffing rates, by shift, using T-tests or repeated measures ANOVA. Comparisons of staffing rates and hand hygiene adherence will be made. Effectiveness of opinion leaders in sustaining hand hygiene adherence rates will be examined using ANOVA. Initial pre-intervention data show low rates of hand hygiene adherence, with specific problem areas identified for intervention. Implications: The hands of hospital staff remain the source of most nosocomial infection transmissions. An emphasis on hand hygiene adherence is the most important way to limit the spread of MRSA and other pathogens. The ripple effect of performing research in a shared governance structure creates synergies that multiply the effects. Funded by a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Arctic Investigations Program, Anchorage AK.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:15:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:15:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.