2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157837
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preventing Falls of Hospitalized Patients
Abstract:
Preventing Falls of Hospitalized Patients
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lopez-Bushnell, Kathy, EdD, MPH, MSN, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico Hospital
Title:Clinical Nurse Researcher
Contact Address:931 Camino Ranchitos NW, Albuquerque, NM, 87114, USA
Contact Telephone:505-272-1959
Co-Authors:George Van Stry, RN, MSN
Purpose: Falls are a major cause of death and morbidity for people in the hospital. In acute care hospitals, the annual incidence of falls ranges from 620 to 2900 per 1000 beds. Studies have reported that between 16% and 52% of patients experience more than one fall during their hospitalization. The purposes of this UNMH Fall Prevention Program were the following: 1) the characteristics of the fall risk patient population were identified through the data collection procedures, 2) the environmental characteristics that contributed to the fall risks of these patients were identified, 3) the nursing intervention reduced the fall rate at UNMH. Background: The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) report, To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System, brought medical errors to the forefront of public attention. The report's estimate that 44,000 to 98,000 Americans die each year as a result of adverse events has captured the public's concern and resulted in a sense of urgency about increased attention to safety in the health care system. Falls are a major cause of death and a significant source of morbidity for people in the hospital. In the United States, accidents represent the sixth leading cause of death in the elderly who are hospitalized more frequently. In acute care hospitals, the annual incidence of falls ranges from 620 to 2900 per 1000 beds. Most falls occur in the patient's room, and studies have reported that between 16% and 52% of patients may experience more than one fall during their hospitalization. The aim in this research was to place patients, their experience and the role of nurses within the practical framework of Neuman systems theory, and to relate the practice of preventing falls to the three dimensions of nursing care: comfort care; knowing the patient; and the therapeutic presence of the nurse. In order to do emphasize the value of nursing in the current climate, and to ensure nurses' continued presence at the bedside, clear articulation of the contribution of nursing interventions to improved patient outcomes was essential. Methods: This was a pre- post-cohort design that included all patients admitted to the Orthopedic unit at the University of New Mexico 4-South Unit. Every patient who was admitted to this unit was assessed according to the nursing "Fall-Risk" care plan and given a score. The plan of care included prevention of falls, which targeted the potential cause of falls. The total number of falls in 2004 was compared to the total number of falls in 2005. The nursing intervention included placing a "fall risk" sign on the patient's door as well as red non-skid slippers on the "fall risk" patients and green non-skid slippers on the "non-fall risk patients" so that all care provider gave extra attention to the patients with the red slippers when they see them getting out of bed or walking on the unit. All the data was entered into the SPSS software program with an Analysis of Variance. Results: The results reflected the characteristics of patients who are at risk for falls which is reflected in the literature and when nurses implement a fall-risk intervention, the incidence of falls can be greatly reduced. Implications: The implications of this evidence based nursing research is that when nurses implement the intervention, patient safety is assured and falls are reduced.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreventing Falls of Hospitalized Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157837-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preventing Falls of Hospitalized Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lopez-Bushnell, Kathy, EdD, MPH, MSN, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Researcher</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">931 Camino Ranchitos NW, Albuquerque, NM, 87114, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-272-1959</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">klopezbushnell@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">George Van Stry, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Falls are a major cause of death and morbidity for people in the hospital. In acute care hospitals, the annual incidence of falls ranges from 620 to 2900 per 1000 beds. Studies have reported that between 16% and 52% of patients experience more than one fall during their hospitalization. The purposes of this UNMH Fall Prevention Program were the following: 1) the characteristics of the fall risk patient population were identified through the data collection procedures, 2) the environmental characteristics that contributed to the fall risks of these patients were identified, 3) the nursing intervention reduced the fall rate at UNMH. Background: The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) report, To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System, brought medical errors to the forefront of public attention. The report's estimate that 44,000 to 98,000 Americans die each year as a result of adverse events has captured the public's concern and resulted in a sense of urgency about increased attention to safety in the health care system. Falls are a major cause of death and a significant source of morbidity for people in the hospital. In the United States, accidents represent the sixth leading cause of death in the elderly who are hospitalized more frequently. In acute care hospitals, the annual incidence of falls ranges from 620 to 2900 per 1000 beds. Most falls occur in the patient's room, and studies have reported that between 16% and 52% of patients may experience more than one fall during their hospitalization. The aim in this research was to place patients, their experience and the role of nurses within the practical framework of Neuman systems theory, and to relate the practice of preventing falls to the three dimensions of nursing care: comfort care; knowing the patient; and the therapeutic presence of the nurse. In order to do emphasize the value of nursing in the current climate, and to ensure nurses' continued presence at the bedside, clear articulation of the contribution of nursing interventions to improved patient outcomes was essential. Methods: This was a pre- post-cohort design that included all patients admitted to the Orthopedic unit at the University of New Mexico 4-South Unit. Every patient who was admitted to this unit was assessed according to the nursing &quot;Fall-Risk&quot; care plan and given a score. The plan of care included prevention of falls, which targeted the potential cause of falls. The total number of falls in 2004 was compared to the total number of falls in 2005. The nursing intervention included placing a &quot;fall risk&quot; sign on the patient's door as well as red non-skid slippers on the &quot;fall risk&quot; patients and green non-skid slippers on the &quot;non-fall risk patients&quot; so that all care provider gave extra attention to the patients with the red slippers when they see them getting out of bed or walking on the unit. All the data was entered into the SPSS software program with an Analysis of Variance. Results: The results reflected the characteristics of patients who are at risk for falls which is reflected in the literature and when nurses implement a fall-risk intervention, the incidence of falls can be greatly reduced. Implications: The implications of this evidence based nursing research is that when nurses implement the intervention, patient safety is assured and falls are reduced.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:15:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:15:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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