2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157838
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Smoking Cessation in Pregnant Adolescents
Abstract:
Smoking Cessation in Pregnant Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lopez-Bushnell, Kathy, EdD, MPH, MSN, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico Hospital
Title:Clinical Nurse Researcher
Contact Address:931 Camino Ranchitos NW, Albuquerque, NM, 87114, USA
Contact Telephone:505-272-1959
Purpose: Smoking cigarettes is a preventable factor associated with low birth weight, preterm birth and perinatal death. Smoking is also related to low rates of breast-feeding initiation, and reduced duration. More than three thousand adolescents start smoking every day in the United States and the majority of these teenagers become addicted to nicotine before they complete high school. Smoking and pregnancy during adolescence contribute to low birth weight and maternal illness. Research demonstrates that between one in five or one in three pregnant women smoke cigarettes during pregnancy. Pregnant women who smoke are usually in the low-income socioeconomic status, socially disadvantaged, high parity, without a partner and receiving Medicaid-funding maternity care. The purpose of this research study was to lower the incidence of smoking pregnant adolescents. Background: Although tobacco use has declined nationally among adults, smoking among youth has increased to its highest level in 16 years. The number of adolescents who become daily smokers before the age of 18 years has increased by 73%. A recent study published by the CDC reports the adolescent subgroup with one of the highest tobacco use in the United States are youth attending alternative high schools. The rate of smoking among this population is 68%. Experimental tobacco use by New Mexican students in tenth grade increased from 57.3% to 58.6%, and in 12th grade from 57.5% to 61.9%. Regular cigarette smoking (every few days or daily) increased from 14.1% to 20.5% among 9th-graders and from 14.2% to 20.5% among 12th -graders. American Indian and Hispanic youth were more likely to use tobacco than non-Hispanic whites. Current use of tobacco among women of reproductive age is 42%, higher than the national average of 30%, and the prevalence among pregnant women is 38%, compared to the national average of 19%. Prevalence of current use among the different ethnic groups included 59% in non-Hispanic whites, 38% of English-speaking Hispanics, and 18% of Spanish-speaking Hispanics. Of the group studied, 36% were under the age of 20. The tobacco use rate for that group was 47.7%. The theoretical framework to be utilized in this study is Prochaska's Transtheoretical Model of Behavior change. The Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change is a comprehensive model describing the stages of change a smoker passes through on the way to successful smoking cessation. Methods: The intervention was a one-year randomized, controlled, school-based trial to test the American Cancer Society's (ACS) Make Yours a Fresh Start Family smoking cessation intervention program with and without peer support for pregnant Hispanic female smokers and teen parents, who attend an alternative high school. Self-report and carbon monoxide testing measured the smoking prevalence. Results: All 60 subjects completed the intervention and there was a 98% cessation rate at the end of 3 months. Implications: The ACS is an effective tool for this population and the peer support was the most effective component of the intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSmoking Cessation in Pregnant Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157838-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Smoking Cessation in Pregnant Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lopez-Bushnell, Kathy, EdD, MPH, MSN, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Researcher</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">931 Camino Ranchitos NW, Albuquerque, NM, 87114, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-272-1959</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">klopezbushnell@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Smoking cigarettes is a preventable factor associated with low birth weight, preterm birth and perinatal death. Smoking is also related to low rates of breast-feeding initiation, and reduced duration. More than three thousand adolescents start smoking every day in the United States and the majority of these teenagers become addicted to nicotine before they complete high school. Smoking and pregnancy during adolescence contribute to low birth weight and maternal illness. Research demonstrates that between one in five or one in three pregnant women smoke cigarettes during pregnancy. Pregnant women who smoke are usually in the low-income socioeconomic status, socially disadvantaged, high parity, without a partner and receiving Medicaid-funding maternity care. The purpose of this research study was to lower the incidence of smoking pregnant adolescents. Background: Although tobacco use has declined nationally among adults, smoking among youth has increased to its highest level in 16 years. The number of adolescents who become daily smokers before the age of 18 years has increased by 73%. A recent study published by the CDC reports the adolescent subgroup with one of the highest tobacco use in the United States are youth attending alternative high schools. The rate of smoking among this population is 68%. Experimental tobacco use by New Mexican students in tenth grade increased from 57.3% to 58.6%, and in 12th grade from 57.5% to 61.9%. Regular cigarette smoking (every few days or daily) increased from 14.1% to 20.5% among 9th-graders and from 14.2% to 20.5% among 12th -graders. American Indian and Hispanic youth were more likely to use tobacco than non-Hispanic whites. Current use of tobacco among women of reproductive age is 42%, higher than the national average of 30%, and the prevalence among pregnant women is 38%, compared to the national average of 19%. Prevalence of current use among the different ethnic groups included 59% in non-Hispanic whites, 38% of English-speaking Hispanics, and 18% of Spanish-speaking Hispanics. Of the group studied, 36% were under the age of 20. The tobacco use rate for that group was 47.7%. The theoretical framework to be utilized in this study is Prochaska's Transtheoretical Model of Behavior change. The Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change is a comprehensive model describing the stages of change a smoker passes through on the way to successful smoking cessation. Methods: The intervention was a one-year randomized, controlled, school-based trial to test the American Cancer Society's (ACS) Make Yours a Fresh Start Family smoking cessation intervention program with and without peer support for pregnant Hispanic female smokers and teen parents, who attend an alternative high school. Self-report and carbon monoxide testing measured the smoking prevalence. Results: All 60 subjects completed the intervention and there was a 98% cessation rate at the end of 3 months. Implications: The ACS is an effective tool for this population and the peer support was the most effective component of the intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:15:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:15:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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