2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157839
Type:
Presentation
Title:
NIC: An Analysis of Limitations
Abstract:
NIC: An Analysis of Limitations
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lyman, Bret, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Northern Colorado
Title:Clinical Instructor
Contact Address:2404 W 25th Street Road, Greeley, CO, 80634, USA
Contact Telephone:970-351-2293
Co-Authors:Linda C. Haynes, PhD, RN and Debra W. Leners, PhD, RN, CPNP
Purpose: The purpose of this pilot research was to determine how well nursing interventions, as defined in the Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC) system, reflect the scope of clinical nursing practice. Background: While reviewing care plans written by nursing students who used the NIC system, it was noted that the interventions used may not accurately reflect the complexity of care provided patients. Given nursing's complex nature and the high demands made of nurses in clinical practice, the profession is often viewed from a high technology perspective rather than high touch. Further reviews of care plans written by nursing students using NIC as a basis for writing nursing interventions revealed a lack of both high touch and high technology in approaches to patient care. These observations suggested limitations previously unexplored with regard to the NIC system, which subsequently prompted this investigation. Methods: A quantitative, retrospective research design was used to generate a sample of NIC interventions for analysis. The sample included all nursing interventions in the A through C sections of the NIC text. Each intervention was categorized according to the verb used to describe the nursing action. A matrix of nursing diagnosis and intervention verbs was established. The interventions were analyzed and compared using a caring theoretical framework, the nursing process, and Bloom's taxonomy.
Results: Pilot research outcomes indicated a significant number of NIC diagnosis were associated with nursing actions that were not sufficiently "high tech" or "high touch". The interventions analyzed in this pilot sample suggest that the NIC system does reflect the complex scope of clinical nursing practice. Analysis of interventions suggested a strong tendency to use verbs that (1) were synonymous (e.g., "teach", "explain", and "instruct") resulting in interventions that suggests a limited scope and complexity of nursing practice (quantity versus quality), (2) did not address complex nursing interventions involving physical contact with patients, and (3) were not reflective of the caring nature of nursing.
Implications: In light of the results of this pilot study, further research is needed to establish whether the NIC system reflects the scope and complexity of contemporary clinical nursing practice. Further evidence-based data is needed to support the efficacy of the NIC system as a model when designing patient plans of care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNIC: An Analysis of Limitationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157839-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">NIC: An Analysis of Limitations</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lyman, Bret, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Northern Colorado</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2404 W 25th Street Road, Greeley, CO, 80634, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">970-351-2293</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lyman_bret@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda C. Haynes, PhD, RN and Debra W. Leners, PhD, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this pilot research was to determine how well nursing interventions, as defined in the Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC) system, reflect the scope of clinical nursing practice. Background: While reviewing care plans written by nursing students who used the NIC system, it was noted that the interventions used may not accurately reflect the complexity of care provided patients. Given nursing's complex nature and the high demands made of nurses in clinical practice, the profession is often viewed from a high technology perspective rather than high touch. Further reviews of care plans written by nursing students using NIC as a basis for writing nursing interventions revealed a lack of both high touch and high technology in approaches to patient care. These observations suggested limitations previously unexplored with regard to the NIC system, which subsequently prompted this investigation. Methods: A quantitative, retrospective research design was used to generate a sample of NIC interventions for analysis. The sample included all nursing interventions in the A through C sections of the NIC text. Each intervention was categorized according to the verb used to describe the nursing action. A matrix of nursing diagnosis and intervention verbs was established. The interventions were analyzed and compared using a caring theoretical framework, the nursing process, and Bloom's taxonomy.<br/>Results: Pilot research outcomes indicated a significant number of NIC diagnosis were associated with nursing actions that were not sufficiently &quot;high tech&quot; or &quot;high touch&quot;. The interventions analyzed in this pilot sample suggest that the NIC system does reflect the complex scope of clinical nursing practice. Analysis of interventions suggested a strong tendency to use verbs that (1) were synonymous (e.g., &quot;teach&quot;, &quot;explain&quot;, and &quot;instruct&quot;) resulting in interventions that suggests a limited scope and complexity of nursing practice (quantity versus quality), (2) did not address complex nursing interventions involving physical contact with patients, and (3) were not reflective of the caring nature of nursing. <br/>Implications: In light of the results of this pilot study, further research is needed to establish whether the NIC system reflects the scope and complexity of contemporary clinical nursing practice. Further evidence-based data is needed to support the efficacy of the NIC system as a model when designing patient plans of care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:15:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:15:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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