2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157841
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Getting What You Asked For, Not What You Hoped: Pilot Results About Relapse
Abstract:
Getting What You Asked For, Not What You Hoped: Pilot Results About Relapse
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Macnee, Carol, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wyoming
Title:Director of Research and Professor
Contact Address:Fay W. Whitney School of Nursing, Box 3065, 1000 E University Avenue, Laramie, WY, 82071, USA
Contact Telephone:307-766-5483
Co-Authors:Susan McCabe, EdD, APRN, BC and Sherrie Rubio-Wallace, MSN, APRN
Purpose: Pilot study data have become an almost universally expected part of any grant application such as an R01 because they can demonstrate the feasibility and potential usefulness of the proposed larger, more costly study. Yet there can be many unanticipated issues and significant costs, financial and personal, inherent in the process of implementing such a pilot study. This paper will discuss the complex issues surrounding pilot testing, from planning to utilization of findings. It will use the experience of implementing a pilot study of a proposed RO1 study currently under NINR review to frame and explicate critical issues. Background: The authors' pilot study was designed to test the methodological feasibility of measures and the data collection process that might be used in a larger study examining patterns of relationships among stress, self-efficacy, meta-motivational states and environment on relapse in three types of health related behaviors - smoking cessation, alcohol cessation, and exercise post cardiac rehabilitation. The purpose of the larger RO1 study is to examine factors that impact relapse proneness. Given the epidemic of heart disease, the social consequences of alcohol abuse, and the continuing costs of tobacco use, health behavior change is increasingly being seen as the very core of efforts to successfully improve health in the United States. Because of the prevalence and economic burden of the health behaviors of interest, the pilot test was predicated on certain assumptions, some of which proved correct, and some that highlighted common pilot study issues such as feasibility, validity, serendipity, theoretical congruency, and subject acceptability. Methods: The pilot study used a longitudinal repeated measures design with a proposed sample of 15 subjects who were followed over a three month period with measures taken at seven theoretically derived time points; weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 & 12. Criteria for inclusion was being in the process of quitting smoking, quitting consumption of alcohol, or establishing a regular exercise pattern following a major cardiac event. A total of 13 measures, including collection of saliva specimens to measure cortisol and to confirm self-report of behavior, were administered to subjects in the study. Outcomes: Implementation of the pilot study began in April 2005. To date a total of eight subjects have been recruited, and only four have completed the study. Findings indicate that the nature of data collection, such as saliva specimens, can be a barrier to recruitment, but subjects find it relatively simple once they begin the process. Management of multiple saliva specimens has proved to be challenging for the investigators. In addition, one of the ten written measures is proving problematic. Specific results indicate a strong relationship between motivational state and self-efficacy, and suggest that stability in stress and motivation are present for those who maintain a behavior change. Conclusions: Specific lessons learned from this study, and generalizable to other pilot testing studies, will be described.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGetting What You Asked For, Not What You Hoped: Pilot Results About Relapseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157841-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Getting What You Asked For, Not What You Hoped: Pilot Results About Relapse</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Macnee, Carol, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wyoming</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Research and Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Fay W. Whitney School of Nursing, Box 3065, 1000 E University Avenue, Laramie, WY, 82071, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">307-766-5483</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cmacnee@uwyo.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan McCabe, EdD, APRN, BC and Sherrie Rubio-Wallace, MSN, APRN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Pilot study data have become an almost universally expected part of any grant application such as an R01 because they can demonstrate the feasibility and potential usefulness of the proposed larger, more costly study. Yet there can be many unanticipated issues and significant costs, financial and personal, inherent in the process of implementing such a pilot study. This paper will discuss the complex issues surrounding pilot testing, from planning to utilization of findings. It will use the experience of implementing a pilot study of a proposed RO1 study currently under NINR review to frame and explicate critical issues. Background: The authors' pilot study was designed to test the methodological feasibility of measures and the data collection process that might be used in a larger study examining patterns of relationships among stress, self-efficacy, meta-motivational states and environment on relapse in three types of health related behaviors - smoking cessation, alcohol cessation, and exercise post cardiac rehabilitation. The purpose of the larger RO1 study is to examine factors that impact relapse proneness. Given the epidemic of heart disease, the social consequences of alcohol abuse, and the continuing costs of tobacco use, health behavior change is increasingly being seen as the very core of efforts to successfully improve health in the United States. Because of the prevalence and economic burden of the health behaviors of interest, the pilot test was predicated on certain assumptions, some of which proved correct, and some that highlighted common pilot study issues such as feasibility, validity, serendipity, theoretical congruency, and subject acceptability. Methods: The pilot study used a longitudinal repeated measures design with a proposed sample of 15 subjects who were followed over a three month period with measures taken at seven theoretically derived time points; weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 &amp; 12. Criteria for inclusion was being in the process of quitting smoking, quitting consumption of alcohol, or establishing a regular exercise pattern following a major cardiac event. A total of 13 measures, including collection of saliva specimens to measure cortisol and to confirm self-report of behavior, were administered to subjects in the study. Outcomes: Implementation of the pilot study began in April 2005. To date a total of eight subjects have been recruited, and only four have completed the study. Findings indicate that the nature of data collection, such as saliva specimens, can be a barrier to recruitment, but subjects find it relatively simple once they begin the process. Management of multiple saliva specimens has proved to be challenging for the investigators. In addition, one of the ten written measures is proving problematic. Specific results indicate a strong relationship between motivational state and self-efficacy, and suggest that stability in stress and motivation are present for those who maintain a behavior change. Conclusions: Specific lessons learned from this study, and generalizable to other pilot testing studies, will be described.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:15:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:15:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.