2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157842
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Photographs of Life: Expressions of Siblings of Children with Down Syndrome
Abstract:
Photographs of Life: Expressions of Siblings of Children with Down Syndrome
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Mandleco, Barbara, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:2815 Wanda Way, Salt Lake City, UT, 84117-4645, USA
Contact Telephone:801-422-7199
Co-Authors:Tina Dyches, EdD; Susanne Olsen, PhD; Aimee L. Latta, BS; Tammy Rampton, BS; and Jessica Rosemann, BS
Purpose: The purposes of this qualitative, descriptive study were to (1) use photography to capture important symbols in the lives of siblings who have a brother or sister with Down Syndrome (DS) that reflect their experiences/perspectives, (2) identify themes emerging from the photographs taken by these siblings, and (3) determine if there are differences in the photographs according to the age and gender of the siblings. Background: Living with a child with DS can be a source of stress when compared to not living with children who have a disability such as DS. This may be because families raising children with DS not only face the daily stressors and challenges experienced by families not raising a child with a disability, but also face unique responsibilities and challenges related to the diagnosis of DS itself. Even though past research has focused on the experiences families have when raising a child with DS, this research frequently examined parents' experiences/perspectives rather than siblings' experiences/ perspectives. Methods: After receiving approval from the Institutional Review Board and obtaining informed consent from parents and assent from children, seventeen school aged siblings of children with DS between 7 and 16 years of age (mean age 10 years 7 months) were asked to take photographs within a two week time period of symbols that reflected their experiences/perspectives. After the snapshots were developed, investigators met individually with each sibling to listen and record the narrative accounts of the photographs. The narrative accounts were then transcribed and the photographs analyzed through content analysis using open, axial, and selective coding. Themes and categories were then identified and quotes chosen from the narrative accounts to illustrate the themes and categories. Results: Analysis revealed two major categories: people/non-people. People consisted of family and friends; non-people consisted of objects, animals and buildings. Every sibling took at least one photograph of his/her family, and the most frequently photographed family member was the child with DS. Non-people photographs portrayed important items such as toys, books, electronics, decorations, domestic/non domestic animals, houses, schools, and churches. Female participants took more photographs of their brothers/sisters, family members, and non-family when compared to male participants, but male siblings took more photographs of their parents than female siblings. The 7 - 9 year olds took more photographs of their parents than any other age group; the 10 - 12 year olds took more photographs of non-family members than any other age group; and the 13 - 16 year olds took more photographs of the child with DS than any other age group. Narratives accounts reflected experiences the siblings had with the people/non- people in the snapshots and their normal everyday activities. Implications: Communication with children can be facilitated by using photography which provides another method of obtaining information about life experiences/ perspectives of siblings living with a child with DS. Information gained not only contributes to our knowledge base, but also allows development of specific intervention plans for siblings of children with DS.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhotographs of Life: Expressions of Siblings of Children with Down Syndromeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157842-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Photographs of Life: Expressions of Siblings of Children with Down Syndrome</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mandleco, Barbara, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2815 Wanda Way, Salt Lake City, UT, 84117-4645, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-422-7199</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">barbara_mandleco@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tina Dyches, EdD; Susanne Olsen, PhD; Aimee L. Latta, BS; Tammy Rampton, BS; and Jessica Rosemann, BS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purposes of this qualitative, descriptive study were to (1) use photography to capture important symbols in the lives of siblings who have a brother or sister with Down Syndrome (DS) that reflect their experiences/perspectives, (2) identify themes emerging from the photographs taken by these siblings, and (3) determine if there are differences in the photographs according to the age and gender of the siblings. Background: Living with a child with DS can be a source of stress when compared to not living with children who have a disability such as DS. This may be because families raising children with DS not only face the daily stressors and challenges experienced by families not raising a child with a disability, but also face unique responsibilities and challenges related to the diagnosis of DS itself. Even though past research has focused on the experiences families have when raising a child with DS, this research frequently examined parents' experiences/perspectives rather than siblings' experiences/ perspectives. Methods: After receiving approval from the Institutional Review Board and obtaining informed consent from parents and assent from children, seventeen school aged siblings of children with DS between 7 and 16 years of age (mean age 10 years 7 months) were asked to take photographs within a two week time period of symbols that reflected their experiences/perspectives. After the snapshots were developed, investigators met individually with each sibling to listen and record the narrative accounts of the photographs. The narrative accounts were then transcribed and the photographs analyzed through content analysis using open, axial, and selective coding. Themes and categories were then identified and quotes chosen from the narrative accounts to illustrate the themes and categories. Results: Analysis revealed two major categories: people/non-people. People consisted of family and friends; non-people consisted of objects, animals and buildings. Every sibling took at least one photograph of his/her family, and the most frequently photographed family member was the child with DS. Non-people photographs portrayed important items such as toys, books, electronics, decorations, domestic/non domestic animals, houses, schools, and churches. Female participants took more photographs of their brothers/sisters, family members, and non-family when compared to male participants, but male siblings took more photographs of their parents than female siblings. The 7 - 9 year olds took more photographs of their parents than any other age group; the 10 - 12 year olds took more photographs of non-family members than any other age group; and the 13 - 16 year olds took more photographs of the child with DS than any other age group. Narratives accounts reflected experiences the siblings had with the people/non- people in the snapshots and their normal everyday activities. Implications: Communication with children can be facilitated by using photography which provides another method of obtaining information about life experiences/ perspectives of siblings living with a child with DS. Information gained not only contributes to our knowledge base, but also allows development of specific intervention plans for siblings of children with DS.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:15:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:15:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.