2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157843
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mexican Immigrants' Saying "NO" To Treatment for Latent TB Infection
Abstract:
Mexican Immigrants' Saying "NO" To Treatment for Latent TB Infection
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:McEwen, Marylyn, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:5830 N. Placita Roanoke, Tucson, AZ, 85704, USA
Contact Telephone:520-626-6926
Purpose: To expose the influence of asymmetrical power relationships between Mexican immigrants and U.S. health professionals on latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) preventive treatment decisions. Background and Rationale: If untreated, 10% of persons with LTBI will develop active tuberculosis (TB) disease at some point in their life; early identification and treatment can prevent TB. In the U.S.-Mexico border region TB rates are higher than in the interior of either country. In 1999, persons of Mexican origin accounted for 23% of foreign-born with TB; 75% of the cases were reported from the four U.S. states bordering Mexico. Multiple factors converge to create a regional TB health disparity - differing explanations of LTBI, non-adherence to preventive treatment, and historically asymmetrical power relationships embedded in the border region. How Mexican immigrants culturally construct LTBI is necessary, but not sufficient, for understanding why they say "no" to preventive treatment decisions. In addition, a sociopolitical context that exposes alternative constructions of LTBI is an essential part of comprehending Mexican immigrants' LTBI treatment decisions in the U.S.-Mexico border region. Methods: A critical ethnographic methodology grounded in asymmetrical power relations historically embedded in the U.S.-Mexico border region was used for this study. Eight (N=8) Mexican immigrants diagnosed with LTBI and at risk of treatment failure participated in this study. Data collection methods included multiple, in depth interviews with participants, participant observation, and chart reviews. Findings: The influence of asymmetrical power relationships within the historical, cultural, political, and economic context of the U.S.- Mexico border, on immigrants' LTBI treatment decisions will be presented. Cultural themes abstracted from the data that represent the emic perspectives of Mexican immigrants' LTBI experience include: (1) Coercion in the health care systems; (2) False compliance; and (3) Equalizing the power. Implications: Co-creating "between the nurse and the Mexican immigrant" a new understanding of TB that includes the etiology, risk, and social significance of LTBI is a promising strategy for decreasing TB health disparities in the U.S.-Mexico border region. This study contributes to the TB elimination research priority for understanding LTBI. Funded by the Laurence B. Emmons Research Award.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMexican Immigrants' Saying "NO" To Treatment for Latent TB Infectionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157843-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mexican Immigrants' Saying &quot;NO&quot; To Treatment for Latent TB Infection</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McEwen, Marylyn, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5830 N. Placita Roanoke, Tucson, AZ, 85704, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-626-6926</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mmcewen@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To expose the influence of asymmetrical power relationships between Mexican immigrants and U.S. health professionals on latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) preventive treatment decisions. Background and Rationale: If untreated, 10% of persons with LTBI will develop active tuberculosis (TB) disease at some point in their life; early identification and treatment can prevent TB. In the U.S.-Mexico border region TB rates are higher than in the interior of either country. In 1999, persons of Mexican origin accounted for 23% of foreign-born with TB; 75% of the cases were reported from the four U.S. states bordering Mexico. Multiple factors converge to create a regional TB health disparity - differing explanations of LTBI, non-adherence to preventive treatment, and historically asymmetrical power relationships embedded in the border region. How Mexican immigrants culturally construct LTBI is necessary, but not sufficient, for understanding why they say &quot;no&quot; to preventive treatment decisions. In addition, a sociopolitical context that exposes alternative constructions of LTBI is an essential part of comprehending Mexican immigrants' LTBI treatment decisions in the U.S.-Mexico border region. Methods: A critical ethnographic methodology grounded in asymmetrical power relations historically embedded in the U.S.-Mexico border region was used for this study. Eight (N=8) Mexican immigrants diagnosed with LTBI and at risk of treatment failure participated in this study. Data collection methods included multiple, in depth interviews with participants, participant observation, and chart reviews. Findings: The influence of asymmetrical power relationships within the historical, cultural, political, and economic context of the U.S.- Mexico border, on immigrants' LTBI treatment decisions will be presented. Cultural themes abstracted from the data that represent the emic perspectives of Mexican immigrants' LTBI experience include: (1) Coercion in the health care systems; (2) False compliance; and (3) Equalizing the power. Implications: Co-creating &quot;between the nurse and the Mexican immigrant&quot; a new understanding of TB that includes the etiology, risk, and social significance of LTBI is a promising strategy for decreasing TB health disparities in the U.S.-Mexico border region. This study contributes to the TB elimination research priority for understanding LTBI. Funded by the Laurence B. Emmons Research Award.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:15:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:15:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.