2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157845
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Analyzing the Roles of APNs and Health Screening in Correctional Facilities
Abstract:
Analyzing the Roles of APNs and Health Screening in Correctional Facilities
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Miller, Sally, PhD, APR, FAANP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Title:Chair, Dept of Physiologic Nursing
Contact Address:4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Box 45-3018, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA
Contact Telephone:702-895-4765
Purposes/Aims: There were two purposes of this study. The first was to describe current practices for health screening at the time of incarceration in county correctional facilities. The second was to assess the percentage of facilities employing nurse practitioners, and the correlation between the presence of nurse practitioners and health screening practices. Rationale/Background: Standards for health screening and disease management in jails are published by appropriate national organizations, but it is unclear that they are utilized as a basis for health care provision. A substantial rise in inmate health-care-related litigation in the mid 1990s prompted speculation that health screening practices have become excessive as a provider protective mechanism. Annual jail expenditures on health care total more than 1.6 billion dollars annually. An exploration of jail screening practices may provide a foundation for more cost effective screening practices. Sample: A 12-item survey was mailed to 773 jails nationally to a mailing list purchased from the National Commission on Correctional Health Care. The list was produced from a query into the database using the term "jail." A total of 343 surveys were returned, for a response rate of 44%. Jails from across the country in seven geographic regions were represented, with facility size ranging from less than 100 to greater than 1000 inmates. Facilities housing males, females, juveniles, and every combination of the three were represented. Facilities were evenly divided between private, for-profit administration and government, not-for-profit administration. Methods: An introductory letter and 12-item survey were mailed to 773 jails nationally. The items included a brief demographic assessment in terms of facility size, geographic region, and gender and age of inmates. Information about for-profit and non-for-profit status was also requested. The remainder of the questions assessed the facility's screening practices and utilization of nurse practitioners. Respondents were also asked to provide information on the types of chronic care clinics that were held in the jails. A return envelope was provided. No compensation was offered for participation. Respondents were provided with the e-mail address of the investigator to request results when available. Results: Results were inconsistent with any standardization among jails. Sixty-four percent of facilities surveyed reported screening all inmates for syphilis; 26.6% reported performing Pap smear screening; 21.1% reported cholesterol screening; 36.4% reported TB screening; 33.0% reported "other" screenings; and 13.8% of facilities reported performing no screenings at all. There was no correlation between facility census and number of screenings performed. There was no difference between for-profit and not-for-profit facilities in terms of screenings performed. There is a significant correlation (p < 0.05) between nurse practitioner hours and mean number of screenings. Implications: Despite the presence of national guidelines for health screening in jails, there appears to be no consistency among facilities in terms of implementation. Further research that describes more explicitly how screening practices are determined and how dollars are spent may provide the foundation for more cost and health effective standards and practices. Funded by University of Nevada, Las Vegas SITE Grant Program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnalyzing the Roles of APNs and Health Screening in Correctional Facilitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157845-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Analyzing the Roles of APNs and Health Screening in Correctional Facilities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Miller, Sally, PhD, APR, FAANP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Las Vegas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Chair, Dept of Physiologic Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Box 45-3018, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">702-895-4765</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sally.miller@unlv.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: There were two purposes of this study. The first was to describe current practices for health screening at the time of incarceration in county correctional facilities. The second was to assess the percentage of facilities employing nurse practitioners, and the correlation between the presence of nurse practitioners and health screening practices. Rationale/Background: Standards for health screening and disease management in jails are published by appropriate national organizations, but it is unclear that they are utilized as a basis for health care provision. A substantial rise in inmate health-care-related litigation in the mid 1990s prompted speculation that health screening practices have become excessive as a provider protective mechanism. Annual jail expenditures on health care total more than 1.6 billion dollars annually. An exploration of jail screening practices may provide a foundation for more cost effective screening practices. Sample: A 12-item survey was mailed to 773 jails nationally to a mailing list purchased from the National Commission on Correctional Health Care. The list was produced from a query into the database using the term &quot;jail.&quot; A total of 343 surveys were returned, for a response rate of 44%. Jails from across the country in seven geographic regions were represented, with facility size ranging from less than 100 to greater than 1000 inmates. Facilities housing males, females, juveniles, and every combination of the three were represented. Facilities were evenly divided between private, for-profit administration and government, not-for-profit administration. Methods: An introductory letter and 12-item survey were mailed to 773 jails nationally. The items included a brief demographic assessment in terms of facility size, geographic region, and gender and age of inmates. Information about for-profit and non-for-profit status was also requested. The remainder of the questions assessed the facility's screening practices and utilization of nurse practitioners. Respondents were also asked to provide information on the types of chronic care clinics that were held in the jails. A return envelope was provided. No compensation was offered for participation. Respondents were provided with the e-mail address of the investigator to request results when available. Results: Results were inconsistent with any standardization among jails. Sixty-four percent of facilities surveyed reported screening all inmates for syphilis; 26.6% reported performing Pap smear screening; 21.1% reported cholesterol screening; 36.4% reported TB screening; 33.0% reported &quot;other&quot; screenings; and 13.8% of facilities reported performing no screenings at all. There was no correlation between facility census and number of screenings performed. There was no difference between for-profit and not-for-profit facilities in terms of screenings performed. There is a significant correlation (p &lt; 0.05) between nurse practitioner hours and mean number of screenings. Implications: Despite the presence of national guidelines for health screening in jails, there appears to be no consistency among facilities in terms of implementation. Further research that describes more explicitly how screening practices are determined and how dollars are spent may provide the foundation for more cost and health effective standards and practices. Funded by University of Nevada, Las Vegas SITE Grant Program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:15:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:15:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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