2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157849
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Analysis of Breastfeeding Support and Duration
Abstract:
An Analysis of Breastfeeding Support and Duration
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Moya, Diane, RNC, IBCLC
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico Hospitals
Title:RN Specialty Nurse
Contact Address:2211 Lomas Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM, 87116, USA
Contact Telephone:505-272-6458
Co-Authors:Ellen Dufault, RNC, BSN; Norma Monarez-Perez, RNC, BSN; and Anne Schaefer-Kelly, CPNP, MPH
Purpose: The purpose of this research survey was to assess the breast feeding support needs of mothers who deliver at the University of New Mexico Hospital, to assess the breastfeeding needs of mothers who are breastfeeding, and to measure the duration of breastfeeding in these mothers. Background: The many benefits that come from breastfeeding are seen not only in the child but in the mother as well. Breast milk is easier to digest for the infant and provides a natural immunity that is passed from the mother to the child. It has the exact amount of protein, sugars, fat, and vitamins that is needed by the infant. The American Academy of Pediatrics stated that human milk, "is uniquely superior for infant feeding and is species specific; all substitute feeding options differ markedly." Studies show that the longer an infant is breastfed the more benefits can be seen in the infant. A meta-analysis of 28 randomized controlled trials from 10 countries involving 23,712 mother-infant pairs demonstrated that all forms of extra support had a beneficial effect on duration of breastfeeding. The problem is that the type of support was not identified. Method: Four surveys of mothers who deliver at the University of New Mexico Hospitals and are breast-feeding and have their baby on the unit were included in the study. The survey nurses on the Mother and Baby Unit conducted the survey with a written script. The initial survey was taken on admission of the mothers to the unit after they gave consent. The nurses then conducted a telephone survey at 2 weeks, 2 and 6 months after delivery. The data was then analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: There were 255 mothers in the initial survey, 150 mothers at 2 weeks, 98 mothers at 2 months and 41 mothers at 6 months who completed the surveys. A large percentage of mothers requested nursing support for breastfeeding (56%), the problems identified with breastfeeding included sore nipples, perceived lack of milk supply, taking medications while breastfeeding, and returning to work and/or school and lack of support for breastfeeding. At 6 months follow-up, 63% of the mothers were still breastfeeding. These mothers want nurses' support and would use a hotline, a lactation consultant, breastfeeding groups, home visits and a lactation clinic. The longer the mother breastfeeds, the fewer problems she has. These mothers are requesting nursing support for their breastfeeding problems. Implications: A nurse run breastfeeding clinic may meet the support and informational needs of mothers who are breastfeeding. This type of clinic has been implemented at the University of New Mexico Hospital.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Analysis of Breastfeeding Support and Durationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157849-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Analysis of Breastfeeding Support and Duration</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moya, Diane, RNC, IBCLC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico Hospitals</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">RN Specialty Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2211 Lomas Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM, 87116, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-272-6458</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dmmoya@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ellen Dufault, RNC, BSN; Norma Monarez-Perez, RNC, BSN; and Anne Schaefer-Kelly, CPNP, MPH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this research survey was to assess the breast feeding support needs of mothers who deliver at the University of New Mexico Hospital, to assess the breastfeeding needs of mothers who are breastfeeding, and to measure the duration of breastfeeding in these mothers. Background: The many benefits that come from breastfeeding are seen not only in the child but in the mother as well. Breast milk is easier to digest for the infant and provides a natural immunity that is passed from the mother to the child. It has the exact amount of protein, sugars, fat, and vitamins that is needed by the infant. The American Academy of Pediatrics stated that human milk, &quot;is uniquely superior for infant feeding and is species specific; all substitute feeding options differ markedly.&quot; Studies show that the longer an infant is breastfed the more benefits can be seen in the infant. A meta-analysis of 28 randomized controlled trials from 10 countries involving 23,712 mother-infant pairs demonstrated that all forms of extra support had a beneficial effect on duration of breastfeeding. The problem is that the type of support was not identified. Method: Four surveys of mothers who deliver at the University of New Mexico Hospitals and are breast-feeding and have their baby on the unit were included in the study. The survey nurses on the Mother and Baby Unit conducted the survey with a written script. The initial survey was taken on admission of the mothers to the unit after they gave consent. The nurses then conducted a telephone survey at 2 weeks, 2 and 6 months after delivery. The data was then analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: There were 255 mothers in the initial survey, 150 mothers at 2 weeks, 98 mothers at 2 months and 41 mothers at 6 months who completed the surveys. A large percentage of mothers requested nursing support for breastfeeding (56%), the problems identified with breastfeeding included sore nipples, perceived lack of milk supply, taking medications while breastfeeding, and returning to work and/or school and lack of support for breastfeeding. At 6 months follow-up, 63% of the mothers were still breastfeeding. These mothers want nurses' support and would use a hotline, a lactation consultant, breastfeeding groups, home visits and a lactation clinic. The longer the mother breastfeeds, the fewer problems she has. These mothers are requesting nursing support for their breastfeeding problems. Implications: A nurse run breastfeeding clinic may meet the support and informational needs of mothers who are breastfeeding. This type of clinic has been implemented at the University of New Mexico Hospital.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:15:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:15:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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