2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157851
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Acculturation and Familism on the Use of Home Care Services
Abstract:
Effect of Acculturation and Familism on the Use of Home Care Services
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Noriega, Leah
P.I. Institution Name:California State University, Bakersfield
Title:BSN Student
Contact Address:205 Manzanillo Drive, Bakersfield, CA, 93314, USA
Contact Telephone:661-664-3102
Co-Authors:Janice D. Crist, RN, PhD; Kathleen L. Gilchrist, RN, PhD, FNP-C; and Suk-Sun Kim, RN, ME, PhD Student
Background: In the United States, the Mexican American elder population is the largest and fastest growing population. There has been a dearth of research reported on Mexican American elders and their use of home care services. It has been reported that Mexican American people have a lower age mortality rate compared to other ethnicities (National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, 2003). De la Torre and Estrada (2001) reported Mexican American people that are more acculturated to the American culture have an unhealthy lifestyle and poor diet, but are found to utilize more health care services. Traditionally, among the Mexican culture, family comes first before the individual. Mexican American families build strong kinships with members in their family especially among the elderly. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to pilot test an investigation of the effect of acculturation and familism of Mexican American elders on the use of home care services. Methodology: A quantitative, exploratory research design was used. The two of nine data collection instruments used were the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans (ARMSA-II) and the Familism Scale from Crist?s (2004) on-going study. Correlation was used to show the relationship between acculturation or familism and the use of home care services. Logistic regression was used to examine the probability of Mexican American acculturation and familism on the use of home care services. The sample size used in the data analysis was five elders. Results: There was a positive relationship (p<0.5) between American acculturation and the use of home care services; in particular, the use of nursing care, physical therapy, and continuous supervision. However in the logistic regression, the models did not successfully predict the use of home care services. Mexican acculturation and familism were not associated with, nor did they predict the use of home care services. A limitation of the study is the lack of generalizability due to the small sample size. Implications: These findings indicate that the larger research study is feasible regarding data collection and analysis and that more acculturated Mexican American elders may be more adapted to American culture and more likely to use nursing care, physical therapy, and require continuous supervision in home care services. These results may be useful for nurse managers to plan home care including nurse-patient and physical therapy-patient staffing ratios and comprehend that this group of patients will require more continuous supervision in their home setting. Future research of Mexican American elders' use of home care services will be to analyze all nine predictors. In addition, comparing Mexican American elders' use of home care services to Asian Americans or Pacific Islanders and their confidence in using home care services would assist nurse managers in predicting staffing ratios for home care services. Funding by CSUB McNair Program, NINR: 1 R15 NR009031-01, Sigma Theta Tau Xi Epsilon Chapter.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Acculturation and Familism on the Use of Home Care Servicesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157851-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Acculturation and Familism on the Use of Home Care Services</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Noriega, Leah</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University, Bakersfield</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">BSN Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">205 Manzanillo Drive, Bakersfield, CA, 93314, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">661-664-3102</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lnoriega@runner.csub.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Janice D. Crist, RN, PhD; Kathleen L. Gilchrist, RN, PhD, FNP-C; and Suk-Sun Kim, RN, ME, PhD Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: In the United States, the Mexican American elder population is the largest and fastest growing population. There has been a dearth of research reported on Mexican American elders and their use of home care services. It has been reported that Mexican American people have a lower age mortality rate compared to other ethnicities (National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, 2003). De la Torre and Estrada (2001) reported Mexican American people that are more acculturated to the American culture have an unhealthy lifestyle and poor diet, but are found to utilize more health care services. Traditionally, among the Mexican culture, family comes first before the individual. Mexican American families build strong kinships with members in their family especially among the elderly. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to pilot test an investigation of the effect of acculturation and familism of Mexican American elders on the use of home care services. Methodology: A quantitative, exploratory research design was used. The two of nine data collection instruments used were the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans (ARMSA-II) and the Familism Scale from Crist?s (2004) on-going study. Correlation was used to show the relationship between acculturation or familism and the use of home care services. Logistic regression was used to examine the probability of Mexican American acculturation and familism on the use of home care services. The sample size used in the data analysis was five elders. Results: There was a positive relationship (p&lt;0.5) between American acculturation and the use of home care services; in particular, the use of nursing care, physical therapy, and continuous supervision. However in the logistic regression, the models did not successfully predict the use of home care services. Mexican acculturation and familism were not associated with, nor did they predict the use of home care services. A limitation of the study is the lack of generalizability due to the small sample size. Implications: These findings indicate that the larger research study is feasible regarding data collection and analysis and that more acculturated Mexican American elders may be more adapted to American culture and more likely to use nursing care, physical therapy, and require continuous supervision in home care services. These results may be useful for nurse managers to plan home care including nurse-patient and physical therapy-patient staffing ratios and comprehend that this group of patients will require more continuous supervision in their home setting. Future research of Mexican American elders' use of home care services will be to analyze all nine predictors. In addition, comparing Mexican American elders' use of home care services to Asian Americans or Pacific Islanders and their confidence in using home care services would assist nurse managers in predicting staffing ratios for home care services. Funding by CSUB McNair Program, NINR: 1 R15 NR009031-01, Sigma Theta Tau Xi Epsilon Chapter.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:15:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:15:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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