2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157853
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Measurement of Exercise Self-Efficacy in Middle Age Adults
Abstract:
The Measurement of Exercise Self-Efficacy in Middle Age Adults
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:O'Malley, Maureen, DNSc, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alaska Anchorage
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3211 Providence Dr., Anchorage, AK, 99508-8030, USA
Contact Telephone:907-786-4584
Many interventions developed to foster exercise in at-risk populations are based on the concept of self-efficacy. Researchers strive to foster confidence and provide feedback to participants in the interest of improving exercise performance. This project reanalyzed data from a prior study, the Influence of Depression on Exercise Compliance (InDEx study) (O?Malley, 2002). The researcher compared exercise self-efficacy measurement strategies from two psychometric tools developed with very different views of the concept of self-efficacy: the Walking Confidence Scale (WCS) (Jeng & Braun, 1995) and the Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale (SEES) (Resnick & Jenkins, 2000). Specific Aims: This study sought to answer several questions: 1) How well do the two tool scores correlate with actual exercise performance data? 2) How strong is the negative correlation between exercise self-efficacy scores and depression scores? 3) Which tool correlates more strongly with exercise performance for middle aged adults at risk of cardiac risk factors? Conceptual Framework: The tools used in this study were based on the Social Learning Theory (Bandura, 1977) and the concept within the theory, self-efficacy. Self-efficacy influences thought patterns and emotional reactions, as well as the ability to accomplish and succeed in life. Those who are low in self-efficacy dwell on their personal deficiencies and ineffectiveness, as well as creating mental obstacles through a focus on the overwhelming nature of the task at hand, in this case adopting an exercise program. Methods: The subjects in the original InDEx (N=35) study participated in a self-efficacy-based exercise enhancing intervention. They exercised at home for a 12-week period and maintained a diary of their exercise performance. Exercise self-efficacy tools were completed at the onset and at the completion of the study period. Results: Of the pretest exercise self-efficacy scales, only the pretest SEES correlated significantly with exercise performance (r=.37, p<.05). The Spearman-Brown corrected correlation coefficient was also calculated between Exercise Frequency and the posttest values: WCS (r=.43, p<.05) and SEES (r=.45, p<05). There was a significant medium inverse correlation between the pretest SEES and pretest CES-D, r(32) = -.35, p<.05. The relationship between the posttest SEES and the posttest CES-D was also significant whether considering parametric statistics (r(27) = -.51, p<.01) or nonparametric statistics (rho(27) = -.51, p<.01). Implications: The posttest SEES demonstrated statistically significant correlations between both Exercise Time and Exercise Frequency. The post test WCS demonstrated statistically significant correlation with Exercise Time only. The SEES also appeared to relate more consistently to level of depression symptoms as the pretest SEES and CES-D and the posttest SEES and CES-D demonstrated statistically significant inverse correlations. References: 1.
Bandura, A. (1977). Self-efficacy: Toward a unifying theory of behavioral change. Psychological Review, 84(2), 191-215. 2. Jeng, C., & Braun, L. (1995). Instrument development and measurement of exercise self-efficacy in cardiac rehabilitation patients. Progress in Cardiovascular Nursing, 10(2), 28-35. 3. O'Malley, M. (2002). The influence of depression on exercise compliance in a self-efficacy-based intervention for adults with coronary heart disease risk factors. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Rush University, Chicago, IL. 4. Resnick, B. & Jenkins, L. (2000). Testing the reliability and validity of the self-efficacy for exercise scale. Nursing Research, 49(3), 154-159.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Measurement of Exercise Self-Efficacy in Middle Age Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157853-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Measurement of Exercise Self-Efficacy in Middle Age Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">O'Malley, Maureen, DNSc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alaska Anchorage</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3211 Providence Dr., Anchorage, AK, 99508-8030, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">907-786-4584</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">afmbo@uaa.alaska.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Many interventions developed to foster exercise in at-risk populations are based on the concept of self-efficacy. Researchers strive to foster confidence and provide feedback to participants in the interest of improving exercise performance. This project reanalyzed data from a prior study, the Influence of Depression on Exercise Compliance (InDEx study) (O?Malley, 2002). The researcher compared exercise self-efficacy measurement strategies from two psychometric tools developed with very different views of the concept of self-efficacy: the Walking Confidence Scale (WCS) (Jeng &amp; Braun, 1995) and the Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale (SEES) (Resnick &amp; Jenkins, 2000). Specific Aims: This study sought to answer several questions: 1) How well do the two tool scores correlate with actual exercise performance data? 2) How strong is the negative correlation between exercise self-efficacy scores and depression scores? 3) Which tool correlates more strongly with exercise performance for middle aged adults at risk of cardiac risk factors? Conceptual Framework: The tools used in this study were based on the Social Learning Theory (Bandura, 1977) and the concept within the theory, self-efficacy. Self-efficacy influences thought patterns and emotional reactions, as well as the ability to accomplish and succeed in life. Those who are low in self-efficacy dwell on their personal deficiencies and ineffectiveness, as well as creating mental obstacles through a focus on the overwhelming nature of the task at hand, in this case adopting an exercise program. Methods: The subjects in the original InDEx (N=35) study participated in a self-efficacy-based exercise enhancing intervention. They exercised at home for a 12-week period and maintained a diary of their exercise performance. Exercise self-efficacy tools were completed at the onset and at the completion of the study period. Results: Of the pretest exercise self-efficacy scales, only the pretest SEES correlated significantly with exercise performance (r=.37, p&lt;.05). The Spearman-Brown corrected correlation coefficient was also calculated between Exercise Frequency and the posttest values: WCS (r=.43, p&lt;.05) and SEES (r=.45, p&lt;05). There was a significant medium inverse correlation between the pretest SEES and pretest CES-D, r(32) = -.35, p&lt;.05. The relationship between the posttest SEES and the posttest CES-D was also significant whether considering parametric statistics (r(27) = -.51, p&lt;.01) or nonparametric statistics (rho(27) = -.51, p&lt;.01). Implications: The posttest SEES demonstrated statistically significant correlations between both Exercise Time and Exercise Frequency. The post test WCS demonstrated statistically significant correlation with Exercise Time only. The SEES also appeared to relate more consistently to level of depression symptoms as the pretest SEES and CES-D and the posttest SEES and CES-D demonstrated statistically significant inverse correlations. References: 1.<br/>Bandura, A. (1977). Self-efficacy: Toward a unifying theory of behavioral change. Psychological Review, 84(2), 191-215. 2. Jeng, C., &amp; Braun, L. (1995). Instrument development and measurement of exercise self-efficacy in cardiac rehabilitation patients. Progress in Cardiovascular Nursing, 10(2), 28-35. 3. O'Malley, M. (2002). The influence of depression on exercise compliance in a self-efficacy-based intervention for adults with coronary heart disease risk factors. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Rush University, Chicago, IL. 4. Resnick, B. &amp; Jenkins, L. (2000). Testing the reliability and validity of the self-efficacy for exercise scale. Nursing Research, 49(3), 154-159.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:16:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:16:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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