2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157857
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Child Physical Activity Questionnaires: Practice & Research Implications
Abstract:
Child Physical Activity Questionnaires: Practice & Research Implications
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Pearce, Patricia, PhD, RN, CS-FNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, #543, 10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-5880, USA
Contact Telephone:801-585-3863
Purpose: This report details a qualitative, descriptive study of middle-school children's: (a) conceptual understanding of a questionnaire and (b) critique of the content and format of six self-report physical activity questionnaires,1 from a larger study in which a computerized application for reporting activity was developed with children, based on their understanding of physical activity, and reporting needs. Background: In clinical practice and research, effective and efficient screening and measurement tools are essential for evaluation of baseline activity, and for interventions. Commonly, self-report questionnaires are used because questionnaires are considered: (a) cost and time efficient, (b) useful to reach individuals even when geographically distant, and (c) less burdensome than invasive procedures. However, the use of questionnaires ultimately shifts the burden of report precision to the reporter. Inconsistent psychometrics of currently available physical activity questionnaires may relate to inattention of designers to generate child-friendly content and format. Methods: Study activities were conducted in a public middle-school in rural North Carolina. Participants (N=12; mean age=12.5 years; range 11-15 years) of 3 ethnic backgrounds (African-American, Caucasian, and Hispanic) comprised the purposeful sample, stratified by grade (6th, 7th, 8th) and gender (50% male; 50% female). The study used a Vygotskian perspective with a Usability Engineering model. Children were in grade-cohorted groups for collaborative, exploratory meetings (N=15) that were audio-recorded, and transcribed verbatim (N=450 pages). Each child answered a sampling of the questionnaire items and discussed questionnaire format and content. Children also expressed their thoughts through creative drawing and writing (N=63 artifacts). Transcripts and artifacts were content analyzed (Atlas/ti software), comparing within and across groups to assure informational saturation. A pediatric nurse researcher, experienced with qualitative methods, and the participants, validated findings. Results: The children adeptly identified the conceptual components of questionnaire development and use, enthusiastically providing a myriad of examples pertinent to their lives, and provided focused, detailed, and balanced commentary about the content and format of the six questionnaires critiqued. Children identified words they did not understand, (e.g., vigorous and per), problems with forced-choice activity lists (e.g., "my stuff isn't there"), and non-intuitive question-answer sets in the questionnaires (e.g., "how do you do it?"). Two overarching themes for a usable questionnaire were identified: the doability factor and play principle. Sub-themes included four major issues the children identified as important for a useful questionnaire. These included: (a) content items reflecting "their" activities (Mirror, Mirror, on the Wall); (b) chronological time orientation (Hickory, Dickory, Dock), (c) just the right amount of challenge (Three Little Bears) and (d) a lengthy lists of activity items (e.g., "it could be a zillion answers") in a format that looked familiar and doable (The Little Train that Could). Implications: Self-report questionnaires shift burden of reporting to the reporter. To improve physical activity self-reporting precision with children in clinical screening and in research, self-report physical activity questionnaires should include developmentally appropriate format and content that reporters deem useful. Improved reporting will translate to heightened understanding of children's physical activity, thus to improved potential for evidence-based practice and prevention of long-term consequences of inactivity. 1 Questionnaires: Physical Activity Checklist, Godin-Shephard Leisure Time Questionnaire, Self-Administered Physical Activity Questionnaire, Bouchard Physical Activity Recall, Physical Activity Questionnaire for Children, Three Day Previous Day Physical Activity Recall. Funding: American Nurses Foundation Scholar/2003 Nurses Charitable Trust Award #2003023; NIH/NINR, National Research Service Award, Individual Fellowship, #F31-NR08173; 2002-2004.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChild Physical Activity Questionnaires: Practice & Research Implicationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157857-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Child Physical Activity Questionnaires: Practice &amp; Research Implications</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pearce, Patricia, PhD, RN, CS-FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, #543, 10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-5880, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-585-3863</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">patricia.pearce@nurs.utah.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This report details a qualitative, descriptive study of middle-school children's: (a) conceptual understanding of a questionnaire and (b) critique of the content and format of six self-report physical activity questionnaires,1 from a larger study in which a computerized application for reporting activity was developed with children, based on their understanding of physical activity, and reporting needs. Background: In clinical practice and research, effective and efficient screening and measurement tools are essential for evaluation of baseline activity, and for interventions. Commonly, self-report questionnaires are used because questionnaires are considered: (a) cost and time efficient, (b) useful to reach individuals even when geographically distant, and (c) less burdensome than invasive procedures. However, the use of questionnaires ultimately shifts the burden of report precision to the reporter. Inconsistent psychometrics of currently available physical activity questionnaires may relate to inattention of designers to generate child-friendly content and format. Methods: Study activities were conducted in a public middle-school in rural North Carolina. Participants (N=12; mean age=12.5 years; range 11-15 years) of 3 ethnic backgrounds (African-American, Caucasian, and Hispanic) comprised the purposeful sample, stratified by grade (6th, 7th, 8th) and gender (50% male; 50% female). The study used a Vygotskian perspective with a Usability Engineering model. Children were in grade-cohorted groups for collaborative, exploratory meetings (N=15) that were audio-recorded, and transcribed verbatim (N=450 pages). Each child answered a sampling of the questionnaire items and discussed questionnaire format and content. Children also expressed their thoughts through creative drawing and writing (N=63 artifacts). Transcripts and artifacts were content analyzed (Atlas/ti software), comparing within and across groups to assure informational saturation. A pediatric nurse researcher, experienced with qualitative methods, and the participants, validated findings. Results: The children adeptly identified the conceptual components of questionnaire development and use, enthusiastically providing a myriad of examples pertinent to their lives, and provided focused, detailed, and balanced commentary about the content and format of the six questionnaires critiqued. Children identified words they did not understand, (e.g., vigorous and per), problems with forced-choice activity lists (e.g., &quot;my stuff isn't there&quot;), and non-intuitive question-answer sets in the questionnaires (e.g., &quot;how do you do it?&quot;). Two overarching themes for a usable questionnaire were identified: the doability factor and play principle. Sub-themes included four major issues the children identified as important for a useful questionnaire. These included: (a) content items reflecting &quot;their&quot; activities (Mirror, Mirror, on the Wall); (b) chronological time orientation (Hickory, Dickory, Dock), (c) just the right amount of challenge (Three Little Bears) and (d) a lengthy lists of activity items (e.g., &quot;it could be a zillion answers&quot;) in a format that looked familiar and doable (The Little Train that Could). Implications: Self-report questionnaires shift burden of reporting to the reporter. To improve physical activity self-reporting precision with children in clinical screening and in research, self-report physical activity questionnaires should include developmentally appropriate format and content that reporters deem useful. Improved reporting will translate to heightened understanding of children's physical activity, thus to improved potential for evidence-based practice and prevention of long-term consequences of inactivity. 1 Questionnaires: Physical Activity Checklist, Godin-Shephard Leisure Time Questionnaire, Self-Administered Physical Activity Questionnaire, Bouchard Physical Activity Recall, Physical Activity Questionnaire for Children, Three Day Previous Day Physical Activity Recall. Funding: American Nurses Foundation Scholar/2003 Nurses Charitable Trust Award #2003023; NIH/NINR, National Research Service Award, Individual Fellowship, #F31-NR08173; 2002-2004.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:16:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:16:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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