2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157858
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rural Women Walking for Health: Can It Happen?
Abstract:
Rural Women Walking for Health: Can It Happen?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Perry, Cindy, PhD, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Family & Child Nursing, PO Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7262, USA
Contact Telephone:206-685-0843
Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this qualitative inquiry was to describe rural women's experiences with adopting a walking program within the context of their daily lives. Rational/Conceptual Basis/Background: Exercise can reduce the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in women, their leading cause of death. Rural women are at particularly high risk for CHD because they have a higher prevalence of risk factors compared with urban and suburban women and diminished medical resources. However, less than 15% of rural women exercise enough to reduce their risk. Critical to increasing their exercise is developing programs that address their crucial motivators and barriers to exercise; yet, little is known specifically about rural women's experiences as they embark on an exercise program. Understanding the motivators and barriers that are germane to rural women while trying to adopt a walking program can assist in developing exercise interventions that resonate with them; thereby, increasing the likelihood of success. Methods: Twenty rural women, ages 22-65 with diverse socioeconomic status, participated in a multifaceted 12-week walking program, Heart-to-Heart (HTH), developed by the investigator. HTH included individual exercise counseling and a weekly group walk and discussion that centered on topics pertinent to the women, such as how to incorporate walking into daily life. Each week, after the group walk and discussion field notes were recorded regarding both the discussion and walk. At the end of the 12-week program 17 women participated in 3 focus groups, which were audiotaped and transcribed. Data were analyzed using qualitative descriptive analysis. Data were coded based on concepts that reflected the women's experiences and categorized into themes. Results: Two main themes were identified: motivators and barriers to establishing a regular exercise routine. Motivators included social support, accountability and commitment to a walking partner and group members, positive physiological changes from exercise, increased self-efficacy, positive role modeling, and self-monitoring. Women described both commitment to and social support from the group as critical in establishing a walking routine. Experiencing positive physiological changes enhanced their exercise self-efficacy and stimulated their aspirations to continue exercising. Barriers included family responsibilities, work responsibilities, negative physiological responses to exercise, poor health, travel, and inclement weather. Family responsibilities, a pervasive barrier, created a wrenching dilemma for women. Women perceived time spent exercising as time away from the family triggering a poignant internal struggle between taking care of the self or the family. Motivators synergistically strengthened their determination and coincided with specific strategies in the HTH program. For example, group members' support was critical in helping women develop creative solutions regarding family and augmented the motivating influence of self-monitoring. Implications: These women's experiences demonstrate that combining group-based strategies, such as group walk and discussion, with individual-oriented strategies, such as self-monitoring, synergistically enhanced motivation and therefore increased the likelihood of adopting a walking routine. Combining both types of strategies in future exercise interventions aimed at rural women may facilitate increasing the number of rural women who exercise enough to achieve a reduction in CHD. Funding Support: National Institutes of Health, Office of Research on Women's Health & the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) Predoctoral Fellowship (F31 NR08656), NINR Predoctoral Fellowship (T32 NR07061), Oregon Health & Science University School of Nursing Dean's Dissertation Award, Northwest Health Foundation, and Sigma Theta Tau International, Beta Psi Chapter.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRural Women Walking for Health: Can It Happen?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157858-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Rural Women Walking for Health: Can It Happen?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Perry, Cindy, PhD, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Family &amp; Child Nursing, PO Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7262, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-685-0843</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">perryc@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this qualitative inquiry was to describe rural women's experiences with adopting a walking program within the context of their daily lives. Rational/Conceptual Basis/Background: Exercise can reduce the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in women, their leading cause of death. Rural women are at particularly high risk for CHD because they have a higher prevalence of risk factors compared with urban and suburban women and diminished medical resources. However, less than 15% of rural women exercise enough to reduce their risk. Critical to increasing their exercise is developing programs that address their crucial motivators and barriers to exercise; yet, little is known specifically about rural women's experiences as they embark on an exercise program. Understanding the motivators and barriers that are germane to rural women while trying to adopt a walking program can assist in developing exercise interventions that resonate with them; thereby, increasing the likelihood of success. Methods: Twenty rural women, ages 22-65 with diverse socioeconomic status, participated in a multifaceted 12-week walking program, Heart-to-Heart (HTH), developed by the investigator. HTH included individual exercise counseling and a weekly group walk and discussion that centered on topics pertinent to the women, such as how to incorporate walking into daily life. Each week, after the group walk and discussion field notes were recorded regarding both the discussion and walk. At the end of the 12-week program 17 women participated in 3 focus groups, which were audiotaped and transcribed. Data were analyzed using qualitative descriptive analysis. Data were coded based on concepts that reflected the women's experiences and categorized into themes. Results: Two main themes were identified: motivators and barriers to establishing a regular exercise routine. Motivators included social support, accountability and commitment to a walking partner and group members, positive physiological changes from exercise, increased self-efficacy, positive role modeling, and self-monitoring. Women described both commitment to and social support from the group as critical in establishing a walking routine. Experiencing positive physiological changes enhanced their exercise self-efficacy and stimulated their aspirations to continue exercising. Barriers included family responsibilities, work responsibilities, negative physiological responses to exercise, poor health, travel, and inclement weather. Family responsibilities, a pervasive barrier, created a wrenching dilemma for women. Women perceived time spent exercising as time away from the family triggering a poignant internal struggle between taking care of the self or the family. Motivators synergistically strengthened their determination and coincided with specific strategies in the HTH program. For example, group members' support was critical in helping women develop creative solutions regarding family and augmented the motivating influence of self-monitoring. Implications: These women's experiences demonstrate that combining group-based strategies, such as group walk and discussion, with individual-oriented strategies, such as self-monitoring, synergistically enhanced motivation and therefore increased the likelihood of adopting a walking routine. Combining both types of strategies in future exercise interventions aimed at rural women may facilitate increasing the number of rural women who exercise enough to achieve a reduction in CHD. Funding Support: National Institutes of Health, Office of Research on Women's Health &amp; the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) Predoctoral Fellowship (F31 NR08656), NINR Predoctoral Fellowship (T32 NR07061), Oregon Health &amp; Science University School of Nursing Dean's Dissertation Award, Northwest Health Foundation, and Sigma Theta Tau International, Beta Psi Chapter.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:16:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:16:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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