2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157860
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Oranges Versus Orange Aromatherapy for Relieving DMSO Associated Symptoms
Abstract:
Oranges Versus Orange Aromatherapy for Relieving DMSO Associated Symptoms
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Potter, Pamela, ARNP, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Senior Postdoctoral Fellow
Contact Address:School of Nursing, BNHS, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195-7266, USA
Contact Telephone:206-616-3065
Co-Authors:Seth Eisenberg, RN, BSN, OCN and Donna L. Berry, RN, PhD, AOCN, FAAN
Purpose/Aims: The purpose is to describe the preliminary data for a pilot study designed to compare the efficacy of sliced orange or orange aromatherapy or deep breathing for relief of coughing, throat irritation, nausea, retching and vomiting (NRV) during reinfusion of stem cells that have been cryopreserved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The specific aims of the study are: 1) To determine the feasibility of administering the study interventions within the clinical setting with regard to: training staff, standardizing study procedures, recruiting participants, obtaining informed consent and measuring intervention outcomes; and 2) To evaluate the efficacy of a sliced orange versus orange aromatherapy versus a usual care deep breathing intervention in prevention and relief of nausea, retching and vomiting (NRV) in the sample above. Rational/Conceptual Basis/Background: Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (SCT) is used to treat a number of malignancies. Collected cells are stored and frozen in liquid nitrogen using DMSO as a cellular preservative. DMSO has a noxious taste and odor, and frequently produces unpleasant throat sensations, coughing and NRV. Though transient, these symptoms are not prevented by the administration of typical pre-meds. Nurses at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have been using oranges based on anecdotal evidence for the past decade in an attempt to alleviate these symptoms. However, no studies of efficacy had been performed by the Center, nor have any studies been published regarding oranges or other forms of aromatherapy. The Human Response Framework "incorporating individual vulnerability and environmental risk and the interplay of biological, psychological and social human responses that influence illness outcomes" provides the conceptual model for this intervention study. Methods: This design is a randomized phase II time series with an early versus late intervention format. Participants receiving SCT are randomized to one of three arms: Orange Intervention (OI), Orange Aromatherapy (OAI), or control (deep breathing). Those in the control group who receive more than three bags of cells are then crossed over to receive either the OI or OAI for bags four through six. Participants are monitored for up to a maximum of six bags of stem cells. At the completion of each bag, they are asked to rate their degree (0-10) of nausea, retching and desire to cough. Heart rate and blood pressure are documented. All responses are entered into a computer database. Results: This study is currently in progress, with a maximum accrual of 60 patients. Descriptive findings and feasibility data will be reported. Implications: Potentially, this will be the first empiric evidence to support or refute a relatively common nursing intervention aimed at ameliorating one of the frequent side effects of stem cell infusions. Funding: University of Washington Biobehavioral Nursing Research Training Grant (T32 NR007107-07) and Puget Sound Oncology Nursing Society.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOranges Versus Orange Aromatherapy for Relieving DMSO Associated Symptomsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157860-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Oranges Versus Orange Aromatherapy for Relieving DMSO Associated Symptoms</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Potter, Pamela, ARNP, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, BNHS, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195-7266, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-616-3065</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">potterpj@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Seth Eisenberg, RN, BSN, OCN and Donna L. Berry, RN, PhD, AOCN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose is to describe the preliminary data for a pilot study designed to compare the efficacy of sliced orange or orange aromatherapy or deep breathing for relief of coughing, throat irritation, nausea, retching and vomiting (NRV) during reinfusion of stem cells that have been cryopreserved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The specific aims of the study are: 1) To determine the feasibility of administering the study interventions within the clinical setting with regard to: training staff, standardizing study procedures, recruiting participants, obtaining informed consent and measuring intervention outcomes; and 2) To evaluate the efficacy of a sliced orange versus orange aromatherapy versus a usual care deep breathing intervention in prevention and relief of nausea, retching and vomiting (NRV) in the sample above. Rational/Conceptual Basis/Background: Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (SCT) is used to treat a number of malignancies. Collected cells are stored and frozen in liquid nitrogen using DMSO as a cellular preservative. DMSO has a noxious taste and odor, and frequently produces unpleasant throat sensations, coughing and NRV. Though transient, these symptoms are not prevented by the administration of typical pre-meds. Nurses at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have been using oranges based on anecdotal evidence for the past decade in an attempt to alleviate these symptoms. However, no studies of efficacy had been performed by the Center, nor have any studies been published regarding oranges or other forms of aromatherapy. The Human Response Framework &quot;incorporating individual vulnerability and environmental risk and the interplay of biological, psychological and social human responses that influence illness outcomes&quot; provides the conceptual model for this intervention study. Methods: This design is a randomized phase II time series with an early versus late intervention format. Participants receiving SCT are randomized to one of three arms: Orange Intervention (OI), Orange Aromatherapy (OAI), or control (deep breathing). Those in the control group who receive more than three bags of cells are then crossed over to receive either the OI or OAI for bags four through six. Participants are monitored for up to a maximum of six bags of stem cells. At the completion of each bag, they are asked to rate their degree (0-10) of nausea, retching and desire to cough. Heart rate and blood pressure are documented. All responses are entered into a computer database. Results: This study is currently in progress, with a maximum accrual of 60 patients. Descriptive findings and feasibility data will be reported. Implications: Potentially, this will be the first empiric evidence to support or refute a relatively common nursing intervention aimed at ameliorating one of the frequent side effects of stem cell infusions. Funding: University of Washington Biobehavioral Nursing Research Training Grant (T32 NR007107-07) and Puget Sound Oncology Nursing Society.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:16:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:16:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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