2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157863
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictive Validity of the PDPI: Implications for Practice
Abstract:
Predictive Validity of the PDPI: Implications for Practice
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Records, Kathie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:2429 W. Nopal Avenue, Mesa, AZ, 85202, USA
Contact Telephone:480-965-1485
Co-Authors:Michael Rice, PhD, ARNP and Cheryl Tatano Beck, DNSc, CNM, FAAN
Purpose: The purpose of this project is to test the predictive validity of the Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory (PDPI). Full use of the instrument in clinical practice and research is limited until item coding is delineated, cut-off scores established, and evidence gathered supporting its predictive ability. Background: Clinical and subclinical levels of postpartum depression affect the lives of millions of families every year. Long term effects have recently been proposed and include slower rate of infant growth and significant developmental delays through adolescence. Clinicians and researchers must have the most valid indicators that provide accurate estimates of the likelihood of developing postpartum depression (PPD). Method: A longitudinal design, guided by stress response theory, was used. English-speaking women (N = 139) in their third trimester of pregnancy were recruited from care provider's offices or through self-referral in the Pacific Northwest. The sample had a mean age of 27 years (SD = 5.2). Ethnic representation approximated that of the locale with the majority of participants reporting Caucasian (88%), Hispanic (4%), or Native American (4%) ethnicity. Women completed the PDPI at 3rd trimester entry into the study and months 2 and 6 postpartum. Concurrent measures of postpartum depression were used including: the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) (months 2, 4, 6, and 8 postpartum), the Centers for Epidemiologic Depressed Mood Scale (3rd trimester and 8th month postpartum), and psychiatric nurse practitioner follow-up for all elevated depression scores. Subjects scoring >12 on the EPDS were considered at risk for depression; 20% of all subjects at 2 months postpartum to 11- 12% at months 4, 6, and 8 had scores at or above the EPDS cut-off. Results: The 3rd trimester PDPI score was predictive of depression at months 2, 4, 6, and 8 postpartum with statistically significant (< .05) moderate correlations of .29 - .45 at each time period. Use of the PDPI at 2 and 6 months postpartum integrates infant care and feeding variables but is only useful for its concurrent validity (r = .57, p = .000; r = .63, p = .000, respectively). Implications: In contrast to the predictive validity obtained with prenatal administration of the PDPI, postpartum administration did not provide evidence supporting its predictive validity. The process of PDPI utilization holds importance for nurse researchers and clinicians. As evidence supporting the predictive validity of this instrument is acquired, clinical and research utility will be increased. Interventions can then be targeted to women most likely to develop PPD. Grant Support: National Institute of Nursing Research, 1R15 NR05311-01A2.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictive Validity of the PDPI: Implications for Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157863-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictive Validity of the PDPI: Implications for Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Records, Kathie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2429 W. Nopal Avenue, Mesa, AZ, 85202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">480-965-1485</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kathie.records@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michael Rice, PhD, ARNP and Cheryl Tatano Beck, DNSc, CNM, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this project is to test the predictive validity of the Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory (PDPI). Full use of the instrument in clinical practice and research is limited until item coding is delineated, cut-off scores established, and evidence gathered supporting its predictive ability. Background: Clinical and subclinical levels of postpartum depression affect the lives of millions of families every year. Long term effects have recently been proposed and include slower rate of infant growth and significant developmental delays through adolescence. Clinicians and researchers must have the most valid indicators that provide accurate estimates of the likelihood of developing postpartum depression (PPD). Method: A longitudinal design, guided by stress response theory, was used. English-speaking women (N = 139) in their third trimester of pregnancy were recruited from care provider's offices or through self-referral in the Pacific Northwest. The sample had a mean age of 27 years (SD = 5.2). Ethnic representation approximated that of the locale with the majority of participants reporting Caucasian (88%), Hispanic (4%), or Native American (4%) ethnicity. Women completed the PDPI at 3rd trimester entry into the study and months 2 and 6 postpartum. Concurrent measures of postpartum depression were used including: the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) (months 2, 4, 6, and 8 postpartum), the Centers for Epidemiologic Depressed Mood Scale (3rd trimester and 8th month postpartum), and psychiatric nurse practitioner follow-up for all elevated depression scores. Subjects scoring &gt;12 on the EPDS were considered at risk for depression; 20% of all subjects at 2 months postpartum to 11- 12% at months 4, 6, and 8 had scores at or above the EPDS cut-off. Results: The 3rd trimester PDPI score was predictive of depression at months 2, 4, 6, and 8 postpartum with statistically significant (&lt; .05) moderate correlations of .29 - .45 at each time period. Use of the PDPI at 2 and 6 months postpartum integrates infant care and feeding variables but is only useful for its concurrent validity (r = .57, p = .000; r = .63, p = .000, respectively). Implications: In contrast to the predictive validity obtained with prenatal administration of the PDPI, postpartum administration did not provide evidence supporting its predictive validity. The process of PDPI utilization holds importance for nurse researchers and clinicians. As evidence supporting the predictive validity of this instrument is acquired, clinical and research utility will be increased. Interventions can then be targeted to women most likely to develop PPD. Grant Support: National Institute of Nursing Research, 1R15 NR05311-01A2.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:16:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:16:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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