2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157864
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Public Health Nursing Protocol on Stunting
Abstract:
Impact of Public Health Nursing Protocol on Stunting
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Reifsnider, Elizabeth, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:U of Texas Medical Branch
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 301 University Blvd, Suite 1029, Galveston, TX, 77555-1029, USA
Contact Telephone:409-772-8262
Co-Authors:Martina Gallagher, PhD, RN
Purpose Aims: The goal of this project was to examine the effects of a culturally-appropriate intervention provided by public health nurses and nutritionists through the WIC program compared to routine WIC visits on height, dietary intake, parent-child interactions, and home environments of low-income Mexican-American children with growth stunting. Rationale: Growth stunting (height below the 5th percentile for age without an organic cause) can be a marker of malnutrition or neglectful parenting. Correction of the height deficit early in life can lead to catch up growth so a child?s full genetic growth potential can be realized. Methods: Stunted children from one WIC agency were enrolled through systematic sampling. Control children (n=70) were enrolled in one year, and the intervention children (n=72) were enrolled the following year. This sampling system prevented the diffusion of the intervention to the control children. The intervention consisted of a series of eight classes that could be taken in any order. Results: The intervention children were significantly taller than the control children at one year after the intervention, however there was no other significant difference in the mean height of the experimental and control groups. However, all the children in the sample grew at an accelerated rate. The mean height of the total sample was at the 2nd percentile in height for age at enrollment, but it rapidly accelerated at each measurement period, and the children's mean height was at the 13th percentile for age at the conclusion of the study two and one-half years after enrollment. The interactions between the children in the experimental group and their mothers were significantly more responsive than the interactions between the children in the control group and their mothers at the measurement periods six months and one year after enrollment. The home environments of the children were also more stimulating at one year after enrollment, or six months after the intervention.
Implications: Accelerated growth in height of low income stunted children, improved maternal child interactions, and more stimulating home environments can be achieved through simple interventions in a public health clinical setting. Funding provided by NIH/NINR 5R29NR4882.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Public Health Nursing Protocol on Stuntingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157864-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of Public Health Nursing Protocol on Stunting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reifsnider, Elizabeth, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">U of Texas Medical Branch</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 301 University Blvd, Suite 1029, Galveston, TX, 77555-1029, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">409-772-8262</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">elreifsn@utmb.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Martina Gallagher, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose Aims: The goal of this project was to examine the effects of a culturally-appropriate intervention provided by public health nurses and nutritionists through the WIC program compared to routine WIC visits on height, dietary intake, parent-child interactions, and home environments of low-income Mexican-American children with growth stunting. Rationale: Growth stunting (height below the 5th percentile for age without an organic cause) can be a marker of malnutrition or neglectful parenting. Correction of the height deficit early in life can lead to catch up growth so a child?s full genetic growth potential can be realized. Methods: Stunted children from one WIC agency were enrolled through systematic sampling. Control children (n=70) were enrolled in one year, and the intervention children (n=72) were enrolled the following year. This sampling system prevented the diffusion of the intervention to the control children. The intervention consisted of a series of eight classes that could be taken in any order. Results: The intervention children were significantly taller than the control children at one year after the intervention, however there was no other significant difference in the mean height of the experimental and control groups. However, all the children in the sample grew at an accelerated rate. The mean height of the total sample was at the 2nd percentile in height for age at enrollment, but it rapidly accelerated at each measurement period, and the children's mean height was at the 13th percentile for age at the conclusion of the study two and one-half years after enrollment. The interactions between the children in the experimental group and their mothers were significantly more responsive than the interactions between the children in the control group and their mothers at the measurement periods six months and one year after enrollment. The home environments of the children were also more stimulating at one year after enrollment, or six months after the intervention. <br/>Implications: Accelerated growth in height of low income stunted children, improved maternal child interactions, and more stimulating home environments can be achieved through simple interventions in a public health clinical setting. Funding provided by NIH/NINR 5R29NR4882.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:16:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:16:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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