2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157865
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Connectiveness in Distance Learning
Abstract:
Connectiveness in Distance Learning
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Rieck, Susan, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Arizona University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:2520 S Shady Knoll Lane, Flagstaff, AZ, 86001, USA
Contact Telephone:928-523-6704
Co-Authors:Laura Crouch, RN, MSN
Purpose/Aim: As the classroom shifts from teacher-centered to learner-centered, students are increasingly required to interact with classmates. Students and instructors learning in an online environment often perceive a lack of connection or "feeling part of" a community of learners, compared with their previous experience in face to face classroom settings. Adding to the sense of disconnection is the diversity in student populations, such as fast-track (second degree, life experience), traditional (recent high school graduates, generally young), satellite campus (students living on the Indian Reservation), and RN-BSN. Another factor that may lessen students' sense of connection is the variety of learning styles. The challenge for instructors is to promote student-to-student connection in distance education-online learning environments. This connection is critical as online courses are integral components of current learning expectations and are becoming educational standards.
Rationale: The purpose of the project was to explore a variety of learning and communication methods implemented by the instructors that students identified as promoting student-to-student connection in the distance learning-online setting. Methods: The researchers surveyed fast-track, traditional, satellite campus, and RN-BSN students regarding their perceptions about course structure that promotes connection with peers, strategies that facilitate communication and connection between students and the instructors, perceptions of rude, impolite, or unkind communication in online courses, and perceptions of effective strategies that defused discourteous communications. Results: Respondents believed that online discussions (52%), face-to-face instruction (46%), and in-person meetings at the beginning of the semester (41%) enhance peer-to-peer connectedness. Students felt that the most effective strategies for communication between instructors and students are timely response to questions and concerns (71%) and meeting at the beginning of the semester (62%). Thirty percent of the students reported having perceived rude or impolite communication in online courses; 15% did not. Most students felt that the rude communication had not been managed effectively, and that the most effective method to address impolite communication is a private email or phone call to the offending student. Implications: Recommendations are (1) development of online courses that promote discussion postings to enhance the student'? perceptions of connectedness, (2) inclusion of face to face contact preferably in person classes or beginning of the semester meetings, (3) responding to the students' questions and concerns in a timely manner, and (4) addressing any discourteous communications privately.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConnectiveness in Distance Learningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157865-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Connectiveness in Distance Learning</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rieck, Susan, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Arizona University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2520 S Shady Knoll Lane, Flagstaff, AZ, 86001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">928-523-6704</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susan.rieck@nau.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Laura Crouch, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aim: As the classroom shifts from teacher-centered to learner-centered, students are increasingly required to interact with classmates. Students and instructors learning in an online environment often perceive a lack of connection or &quot;feeling part of&quot; a community of learners, compared with their previous experience in face to face classroom settings. Adding to the sense of disconnection is the diversity in student populations, such as fast-track (second degree, life experience), traditional (recent high school graduates, generally young), satellite campus (students living on the Indian Reservation), and RN-BSN. Another factor that may lessen students' sense of connection is the variety of learning styles. The challenge for instructors is to promote student-to-student connection in distance education-online learning environments. This connection is critical as online courses are integral components of current learning expectations and are becoming educational standards. <br/>Rationale: The purpose of the project was to explore a variety of learning and communication methods implemented by the instructors that students identified as promoting student-to-student connection in the distance learning-online setting. Methods: The researchers surveyed fast-track, traditional, satellite campus, and RN-BSN students regarding their perceptions about course structure that promotes connection with peers, strategies that facilitate communication and connection between students and the instructors, perceptions of rude, impolite, or unkind communication in online courses, and perceptions of effective strategies that defused discourteous communications. Results: Respondents believed that online discussions (52%), face-to-face instruction (46%), and in-person meetings at the beginning of the semester (41%) enhance peer-to-peer connectedness. Students felt that the most effective strategies for communication between instructors and students are timely response to questions and concerns (71%) and meeting at the beginning of the semester (62%). Thirty percent of the students reported having perceived rude or impolite communication in online courses; 15% did not. Most students felt that the rude communication had not been managed effectively, and that the most effective method to address impolite communication is a private email or phone call to the offending student. Implications: Recommendations are (1) development of online courses that promote discussion postings to enhance the student'? perceptions of connectedness, (2) inclusion of face to face contact preferably in person classes or beginning of the semester meetings, (3) responding to the students' questions and concerns in a timely manner, and (4) addressing any discourteous communications privately.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:16:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:16:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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