2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157866
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Methamphetamine Use and HIV Symptom Self-Management
Abstract:
Methamphetamine Use and HIV Symptom Self-Management
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Robinson, Linda, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of San Diego
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA, 92110-2492, USA
Contact Telephone:619-260-4571
Co-Authors:Harvey Rempel, MEd
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine methamphetamine use in relation to HIV-related symptoms. Rationale and Background: The methamphetamine epidemic represents a serious drug problem and has created a serious challenge in dealing with the HIV epidemic. New HIV infections are occurring because of a rise in unsafe sex practices during methamphetamine use. Methamphetamine has been shown to accelerate the rate of neuropsychological impairment associated with HIV infection, as well as HIV replication and mutation. Living with HIV disease involves daily self management strategies to cope with HIV-related symptoms. Research is needed to investigate whether methamphetamine is used to manage HIV-related symptoms. Methods: A convenience sample of HIV+ men (n=20) provided the data for this descriptive study. Participants were interviewed in private locations and were paid $25.00 at the end of the interview. Each participant completed the Revised Sign and Symptom checklist-HIV, the Addiction Severity Index-Lite and a demographic questionnaire including HIV information. Completion of the instruments was followed by a semi-structured interview designed to elicit information on motivation for methamphetamine use.
Results: On average participants reported being HIV+ and used methamphetamine for about 10 years. The average CD4 count was 482; less than half of the sample was taking antiretroviral therapy. Although there were few HIV-related symptoms overall, fear, fatigue, and numbness were the most common. The primary motivation for methamphetamine use was sexual enhancement. However, methamphetamine was also used to manage depression, fatigue and neuropathic pain. Participants described that while methamphetamine alleviated symptoms temporarily, these symptoms recurred, often times with greater intensity, when coming down off the methamphetamine. Implications: Findings from this pilot study suggest that methamphetamine provides immediate relief from some HIV-related symptoms and has been used in the daily management of HIV. Methamphetamine addiction and HIV infection are co-morbid conditions that cannot be effectively treated separately or in succession. The interplay between methamphetamine use and HIV management demands an integrated model of care. Further examination of whether methamphetamine use influences HIV symptom management in a larger sample is needed. Funded by NIH/NINR, T32 NOR7077.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMethamphetamine Use and HIV Symptom Self-Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157866-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Methamphetamine Use and HIV Symptom Self-Management</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robinson, Linda, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of San Diego</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA, 92110-2492, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">619-260-4571</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lindar@sandiego.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Harvey Rempel, MEd</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine methamphetamine use in relation to HIV-related symptoms. Rationale and Background: The methamphetamine epidemic represents a serious drug problem and has created a serious challenge in dealing with the HIV epidemic. New HIV infections are occurring because of a rise in unsafe sex practices during methamphetamine use. Methamphetamine has been shown to accelerate the rate of neuropsychological impairment associated with HIV infection, as well as HIV replication and mutation. Living with HIV disease involves daily self management strategies to cope with HIV-related symptoms. Research is needed to investigate whether methamphetamine is used to manage HIV-related symptoms. Methods: A convenience sample of HIV+ men (n=20) provided the data for this descriptive study. Participants were interviewed in private locations and were paid $25.00 at the end of the interview. Each participant completed the Revised Sign and Symptom checklist-HIV, the Addiction Severity Index-Lite and a demographic questionnaire including HIV information. Completion of the instruments was followed by a semi-structured interview designed to elicit information on motivation for methamphetamine use. <br/>Results: On average participants reported being HIV+ and used methamphetamine for about 10 years. The average CD4 count was 482; less than half of the sample was taking antiretroviral therapy. Although there were few HIV-related symptoms overall, fear, fatigue, and numbness were the most common. The primary motivation for methamphetamine use was sexual enhancement. However, methamphetamine was also used to manage depression, fatigue and neuropathic pain. Participants described that while methamphetamine alleviated symptoms temporarily, these symptoms recurred, often times with greater intensity, when coming down off the methamphetamine. Implications: Findings from this pilot study suggest that methamphetamine provides immediate relief from some HIV-related symptoms and has been used in the daily management of HIV. Methamphetamine addiction and HIV infection are co-morbid conditions that cannot be effectively treated separately or in succession. The interplay between methamphetamine use and HIV management demands an integrated model of care. Further examination of whether methamphetamine use influences HIV symptom management in a larger sample is needed. Funded by NIH/NINR, T32 NOR7077.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:16:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:16:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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