2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157867
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stress and Coping by Decider Status of Midlife Women in Divorce Transition
Abstract:
Stress and Coping by Decider Status of Midlife Women in Divorce Transition
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Sakraida, Teresa, DNSc, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado at Denver and HSC
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 4200 E Ninth Avenue, C288-18, Denver, CO, 80262, USA
Contact Telephone:303-315-1932
Divorce prevalence rose for midlife women in recent years. Frequency, intensity, and duration of anxiety, depression, and loneliness are greater for midlife women than divorced younger women. Post-divorce trajectories vary according to personal control in the divorce decision. Framed by the Transition Model (Schlossberg, Waters, & Goodman, 1995), characterizing stress and coping by decider status of initiator, non-initiator, and mutual-decider clarifies the divorce transition experience. Purpose: Derived from a triangulated method study about midlife women divorce experiences, this report aims to describe stress and coping by decider status. Methods: Nonprobability, convenience/network procedures facilitated sampling from divorce groups and court records in Indiana and Pennsylvania. Criteria included: 34-54 years, divorce from first marriage, married three years before divorced, and divorced in last two years. Telephone scripted contact seeking permission to mail a study packet was followed by mailed packets to 247 women. Returned consent with completed instruments yielded a 65% response (N=154). A Personal Profile Form collected demographics including self-categorized decider statuses (Initiators, n=83; Non-initiators, n= 42; Mutual-deciders, n=29). Respondents were divorced an average of 15.1 months (SD=8.46). The ten Stress Appraisal Items of the Coping Response Inventory (CRI) (Moos, 1993) asked about the divorce stressor. Chi-square measured differences in yes or no item responses by decider statuses. For the 2 X 3 table, Cramer's V was reported. Coping Response Subscales (CRI) included 48 Likert, 4-point scale, items about logical analysis, positive reappraisal, seeking guidance and support, problem solving, cognitive avoidance, acceptance or resignation, seeking alternative rewards, and emotional discharge. One-way ANOVA analyzed differences in coping response by decider statuses with a Post hoc Bonferroni procedure. Results/Outcomes: Six stress items demonstrated significance. Non-initiators, 83.3% reported not knowing the divorce experience was going to occur, X square (2, N = 154) = 12.09, p = .002 or have enough time to get ready for it, 80.5%, X square (2, N = 154) = 20.41, p = .000. Non-initiators, 85.7% perceived the divorce experience as a threat, X square (2, N = 154) = 20.90, p = .000; while 67.5% of initiators and 65.5% of mutual-deciders viewed the divorce experience as a challenge X square (2, N = 154) = 7.42, p = .025. Non-initiators, 90.5% identified the divorce experience cause as something someone else did X square (2, N = 154) = 11.30, p = .004. Pertaining to the divorce experience working out, 65.9% of non-initiators were less positive than initiators or mutual-deciders X square (2, N= 154) = 9.20, p = .010. On the CRI, only acceptance or resignation was significantly different between groups, F (2, 151) = 3.37, p = .037. Relationship between decider statuses and acceptance or resignation accounted for 4.3% variance. Post hoc analysis indicated acceptance or resignation, differed significantly between the non-initiators and the mutual-deciders (p =.04), but no differences between the non-initiators and the initiators (p = .46). Implications for Practice: Characterizing midlife divorce transition experiences of stress and coping provides a foundation for development of tailored primary intervention supporting personal growth, healing, and healthy lifestyle during a life event risk.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStress and Coping by Decider Status of Midlife Women in Divorce Transitionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157867-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stress and Coping by Decider Status of Midlife Women in Divorce Transition</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sakraida, Teresa, DNSc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado at Denver and HSC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 4200 E Ninth Avenue, C288-18, Denver, CO, 80262, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303-315-1932</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">teresa.sakraida@uchsc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Divorce prevalence rose for midlife women in recent years. Frequency, intensity, and duration of anxiety, depression, and loneliness are greater for midlife women than divorced younger women. Post-divorce trajectories vary according to personal control in the divorce decision. Framed by the Transition Model (Schlossberg, Waters, &amp; Goodman, 1995), characterizing stress and coping by decider status of initiator, non-initiator, and mutual-decider clarifies the divorce transition experience. Purpose: Derived from a triangulated method study about midlife women divorce experiences, this report aims to describe stress and coping by decider status. Methods: Nonprobability, convenience/network procedures facilitated sampling from divorce groups and court records in Indiana and Pennsylvania. Criteria included: 34-54 years, divorce from first marriage, married three years before divorced, and divorced in last two years. Telephone scripted contact seeking permission to mail a study packet was followed by mailed packets to 247 women. Returned consent with completed instruments yielded a 65% response (N=154). A Personal Profile Form collected demographics including self-categorized decider statuses (Initiators, n=83; Non-initiators, n= 42; Mutual-deciders, n=29). Respondents were divorced an average of 15.1 months (SD=8.46). The ten Stress Appraisal Items of the Coping Response Inventory (CRI) (Moos, 1993) asked about the divorce stressor. Chi-square measured differences in yes or no item responses by decider statuses. For the 2 X 3 table, Cramer's V was reported. Coping Response Subscales (CRI) included 48 Likert, 4-point scale, items about logical analysis, positive reappraisal, seeking guidance and support, problem solving, cognitive avoidance, acceptance or resignation, seeking alternative rewards, and emotional discharge. One-way ANOVA analyzed differences in coping response by decider statuses with a Post hoc Bonferroni procedure. Results/Outcomes: Six stress items demonstrated significance. Non-initiators, 83.3% reported not knowing the divorce experience was going to occur, X square (2, N = 154) = 12.09, p = .002 or have enough time to get ready for it, 80.5%, X square (2, N = 154) = 20.41, p = .000. Non-initiators, 85.7% perceived the divorce experience as a threat, X square (2, N = 154) = 20.90, p = .000; while 67.5% of initiators and 65.5% of mutual-deciders viewed the divorce experience as a challenge X square (2, N = 154) = 7.42, p = .025. Non-initiators, 90.5% identified the divorce experience cause as something someone else did X square (2, N = 154) = 11.30, p = .004. Pertaining to the divorce experience working out, 65.9% of non-initiators were less positive than initiators or mutual-deciders X square (2, N= 154) = 9.20, p = .010. On the CRI, only acceptance or resignation was significantly different between groups, F (2, 151) = 3.37, p = .037. Relationship between decider statuses and acceptance or resignation accounted for 4.3% variance. Post hoc analysis indicated acceptance or resignation, differed significantly between the non-initiators and the mutual-deciders (p =.04), but no differences between the non-initiators and the initiators (p = .46). Implications for Practice: Characterizing midlife divorce transition experiences of stress and coping provides a foundation for development of tailored primary intervention supporting personal growth, healing, and healthy lifestyle during a life event risk.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:16:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:16:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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