2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157872
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Testosterone and Sexual Desire (Libido) Across the Menopausal Transition
Abstract:
Testosterone and Sexual Desire (Libido) Across the Menopausal Transition
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Smith-DiJulio, Kathleen, RN, MA
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Research Scientist
Contact Address:1625 E McGraw Street, Seattle, WA, 98112, USA
Contact Telephone:206-616-2810
Co-Authors:Ellen S. Mitchell, RN, PhD; Don Percival, PhD; and Nancy Fugate Woods, RN, PhD
Introduction: The most recent medical-pharmaceutical approach to physiologic changes associated with the menopausal transition (MT) or postmenopause (PM) is the promotion of testosterone use by women experiencing decreased sexual desire. Neither a normal physiologic range for testosterone levels nor an absolute threshold for testosterone insufficiency has been established in women in the MT and PM. The relationship between testosterone and energy levels in this population has not been examined. Purposes: First, describe patterns of change for testosterone, sexual desire, and energy across the MT and PM and second, test the relationships between testosterone and sexual desire and between testosterone and energy across the MT and PM. Methods: The sample consisted of a subset of women from the Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study (SMWHS) in middle or late MT, or postmenopausal (PM), not on hormones, who returned diaries and provided urine samples between 1997 and 2004, n=118. The diary elicited self-reports of amount of decrease in sexual desire (not present to extreme) as well as feelings of sexual desire and energy in the past 24 hours (not at all to very much). Total testosterone was measured from early morning urine samples. A sample cross-correlation was computed for each woman between testosterone level and ratings of sexual desire and energy. The null hypothesis of no correlation was evaluated using a binomial (sign) test, for which a value of one (zero) was assigned to each woman with a positive (negative) sample cross-correlation. The null hypothesis was rejected if the sample of zeros and ones was inconsistent with the hypothesis of equal occurrence. Results: For the total sample mean testosterone levels were 23.0709ng/mg Cr (median = 19.6289 ng/mg Cr). There was no significant relationship between testosterone and decreases in sexual desire, feelings of sexual desire or energy so the null hypotheses could not be rejected. Positive correlations between testosterone and decreased sexual desire occurred in 48 of 93 women, p = 0.8358; between testosterone and feelings of sexual desire, in 61 of 110 women, p = 0.2924 and between testosterone energy, in 54 of 116 women, p = 0.5159. Within stage analysis revealed a significant positive cross-correlation in Late stage for 43 of 62 women, p = 0.003. Feelings of sexual desire decreased along with testosterone levels. Implications: These findings argue against a standard, universal approach of testosterone administration in response to women's changing levels of sexual desire. Factors other than testosterone influence decreases in sexual desire as well as feelings of sexual desire and energy. Funding Source: NINR RO1 NR04141 and P30 NR04001.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTestosterone and Sexual Desire (Libido) Across the Menopausal Transitionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157872-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Testosterone and Sexual Desire (Libido) Across the Menopausal Transition</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith-DiJulio, Kathleen, RN, MA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1625 E McGraw Street, Seattle, WA, 98112, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-616-2810</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ksdj@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ellen S. Mitchell, RN, PhD; Don Percival, PhD; and Nancy Fugate Woods, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: The most recent medical-pharmaceutical approach to physiologic changes associated with the menopausal transition (MT) or postmenopause (PM) is the promotion of testosterone use by women experiencing decreased sexual desire. Neither a normal physiologic range for testosterone levels nor an absolute threshold for testosterone insufficiency has been established in women in the MT and PM. The relationship between testosterone and energy levels in this population has not been examined. Purposes: First, describe patterns of change for testosterone, sexual desire, and energy across the MT and PM and second, test the relationships between testosterone and sexual desire and between testosterone and energy across the MT and PM. Methods: The sample consisted of a subset of women from the Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study (SMWHS) in middle or late MT, or postmenopausal (PM), not on hormones, who returned diaries and provided urine samples between 1997 and 2004, n=118. The diary elicited self-reports of amount of decrease in sexual desire (not present to extreme) as well as feelings of sexual desire and energy in the past 24 hours (not at all to very much). Total testosterone was measured from early morning urine samples. A sample cross-correlation was computed for each woman between testosterone level and ratings of sexual desire and energy. The null hypothesis of no correlation was evaluated using a binomial (sign) test, for which a value of one (zero) was assigned to each woman with a positive (negative) sample cross-correlation. The null hypothesis was rejected if the sample of zeros and ones was inconsistent with the hypothesis of equal occurrence. Results: For the total sample mean testosterone levels were 23.0709ng/mg Cr (median = 19.6289 ng/mg Cr). There was no significant relationship between testosterone and decreases in sexual desire, feelings of sexual desire or energy so the null hypotheses could not be rejected. Positive correlations between testosterone and decreased sexual desire occurred in 48 of 93 women, p = 0.8358; between testosterone and feelings of sexual desire, in 61 of 110 women, p = 0.2924 and between testosterone energy, in 54 of 116 women, p = 0.5159. Within stage analysis revealed a significant positive cross-correlation in Late stage for 43 of 62 women, p = 0.003. Feelings of sexual desire decreased along with testosterone levels. Implications: These findings argue against a standard, universal approach of testosterone administration in response to women's changing levels of sexual desire. Factors other than testosterone influence decreases in sexual desire as well as feelings of sexual desire and energy. Funding Source: NINR RO1 NR04141 and P30 NR04001.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:17:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:17:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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