2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157874
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Exercise on Psychological Stress and IL-6 in Older Adults
Abstract:
The Effects of Exercise on Psychological Stress and IL-6 in Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Starkweather, Angela, PhD, RN, ACNP, CCRN, CNRN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Intercollegiate College of Nursing, 2917 West Fort George Wright Drive, RM 369, Spokane, WA, 99224, USA
Contact Telephone:509-324-7279
Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effects of a ten-week exercise program on psychological stress, mood, quality of life, serum IL-6 and cortisol among older adults. Background: The United States population over age 65 is projected to grow from 35 million in 2000 to 70 million in 2030. As the baby boomers age, millions of older adults will be suffering from chronic disease and disability unless preventive measures are taken. Overproduction of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 (interleukin-6) has been linked to a myriad of age-related conditions including cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, arthritis, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, frailty and functional decline. Physical activity has been shown to decrease stress-induced immunosuppression and enhance immune regulation through increasing immune components and decreasing the production of cytokines, especially IL-6, in older adults. However, the specific dose of physical activity (duration per day, intensity, amount per week) required to induce these effects have not been clearly explicated. Methods: A pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of a walking program on perceived stress and IL-6 production among men and women, age 60-90. Undergraduate BSN students taught participants in the exercise group (N=10) how to compute 60% of their maximal heart rate while walking. Student nurses walked with the participant once a week for ten consecutive weeks. The exercise group was encouraged to walk at a rate that enabled them to achieve their maximal heart rate for 30 minutes per day, five days per week. A control group of non-exercising men and women were used for comparisons (N=10). All participants recorded their daily level of physical activity in a journal. Data collection took place at the participant's home before the intervention (T1) and after the conclusion of the ten week exercise intervention (T2). Stress, mood and quality of life were measured by self-report instruments while blood samples were collected for measurement of serum IL-6 and cortisol at T1 and T2. Results: Stress, measured by the Perceived Stress Scale, decreased significantly from T1 to T2 in the exercise intervention group (t=3.6, 9, p<0.005). PSS was significantly lower in the exercise intervention group at T2 compared with the non-exercising group (t=3.5, 18, p<0.003). In addition, the exercise group showed a reduction in IL-6 levels from T1 (7.19+7.7) to T2 (3.05+1.7) while the non-exercising group had a rise in IL-6 (4.53+4.1; 5.68+3.0 respectively) between the two time points. The decrease in IL-6 between T1 and T2 was significantly different in the exercise intervention group compared to the non-exercising group (t=-2.02, 18, p<0.05). Although non-significant, mood disturbance and quality of life were higher and serum cortisol was lower in the exercise group at T2 compared to the control group. Implications: The activity intervention performed in this study demonstrated that it significantly reduced psychological stress and serum IL-6. This study provides empirical evidence to recommend this specific intervention (walking at 60% of maximal heart rate for 30 minutes per day, five days per week) in older adult populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Exercise on Psychological Stress and IL-6 in Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157874-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Exercise on Psychological Stress and IL-6 in Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Starkweather, Angela, PhD, RN, ACNP, CCRN, CNRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Intercollegiate College of Nursing, 2917 West Fort George Wright Drive, RM 369, Spokane, WA, 99224, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">509-324-7279</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">astarkweather@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effects of a ten-week exercise program on psychological stress, mood, quality of life, serum IL-6 and cortisol among older adults. Background: The United States population over age 65 is projected to grow from 35 million in 2000 to 70 million in 2030. As the baby boomers age, millions of older adults will be suffering from chronic disease and disability unless preventive measures are taken. Overproduction of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 (interleukin-6) has been linked to a myriad of age-related conditions including cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, arthritis, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, frailty and functional decline. Physical activity has been shown to decrease stress-induced immunosuppression and enhance immune regulation through increasing immune components and decreasing the production of cytokines, especially IL-6, in older adults. However, the specific dose of physical activity (duration per day, intensity, amount per week) required to induce these effects have not been clearly explicated. Methods: A pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of a walking program on perceived stress and IL-6 production among men and women, age 60-90. Undergraduate BSN students taught participants in the exercise group (N=10) how to compute 60% of their maximal heart rate while walking. Student nurses walked with the participant once a week for ten consecutive weeks. The exercise group was encouraged to walk at a rate that enabled them to achieve their maximal heart rate for 30 minutes per day, five days per week. A control group of non-exercising men and women were used for comparisons (N=10). All participants recorded their daily level of physical activity in a journal. Data collection took place at the participant's home before the intervention (T1) and after the conclusion of the ten week exercise intervention (T2). Stress, mood and quality of life were measured by self-report instruments while blood samples were collected for measurement of serum IL-6 and cortisol at T1 and T2. Results: Stress, measured by the Perceived Stress Scale, decreased significantly from T1 to T2 in the exercise intervention group (t=3.6, 9, p&lt;0.005). PSS was significantly lower in the exercise intervention group at T2 compared with the non-exercising group (t=3.5, 18, p&lt;0.003). In addition, the exercise group showed a reduction in IL-6 levels from T1 (7.19+7.7) to T2 (3.05+1.7) while the non-exercising group had a rise in IL-6 (4.53+4.1; 5.68+3.0 respectively) between the two time points. The decrease in IL-6 between T1 and T2 was significantly different in the exercise intervention group compared to the non-exercising group (t=-2.02, 18, p&lt;0.05). Although non-significant, mood disturbance and quality of life were higher and serum cortisol was lower in the exercise group at T2 compared to the control group. Implications: The activity intervention performed in this study demonstrated that it significantly reduced psychological stress and serum IL-6. This study provides empirical evidence to recommend this specific intervention (walking at 60% of maximal heart rate for 30 minutes per day, five days per week) in older adult populations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:17:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:17:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.