2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157877
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Melatonin Level and Pattern Differ in Postpartum and Nulliparous Women
Abstract:
Melatonin Level and Pattern Differ in Postpartum and Nulliparous Women
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Thomas, Karen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7262, USA
Contact Telephone:206-543-8231
Co-Authors:Robert L. Burr, MSEE, PhD
Background: Minimal research has characterized melatonin in the postpartum period despite its close connection to sleep and circadian rhythms which are altered by infant caregiving demands. Purpose: Twenty-four hour measures of melatonin were compared in healthy postpartum and nulliparous women. Research questions included: (1) Do urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels over a 24-hour period differ in postpartum and nulliparous women of childbearing age? (2) Does the timing of urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin onset differ in postpartum and nulliparous women?
Methods: Thirty-eight postpartum and 20 nulliparous, age 18 to 40 years, women living in typical environments collected a sample of each voiding throughout a 24-hour period. Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (6-sMT) was assayed (ELISA) and corrected for volume using creatinine measured using spectrophotometry. Within subject values for 6-sMT mean, maximum, percent rise, and timing of melatonin onset (defined as baseline mean + 2 SD) were determined. 6-sMT levels were compared using MANOVA. Proportion of 6-sMT rise occurring during night time was compared using Z scores. The time profile for melatonin was represented as normalized cumulative area under the curve and compared using Mann-Whitney U. Results: Postpartum women had significantly higher baseline, lower maximum, and lower percent rise 6-sMT than nulliparous women (p < 0.005) and significantly lower proportion of 6-sMT rise occurring during night time hours (Z = 4.338, p < .000). The pattern of 6-sMT production over 24-hours differed between groups (p = 0.016). Implications: Findings suggest postpartum differences in amount and timing of melatonin. While environment light exposure during night time infant caregiving is a likely explanation, further research is needed to determine sleep and circadian influences in the postpartum period. Entrainment to circadian rhythm, reflected in the timing of melatonin onset, is linked to health outcomes. Implications of melatonin level are not well understood, however melatonin exerts wide influences beyond being a marker of light-dark pattern including connections with breast cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Funding: National Institute of Nursing Research (K01-NR00167 and 2 P30 NR04001).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMelatonin Level and Pattern Differ in Postpartum and Nulliparous Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157877-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Melatonin Level and Pattern Differ in Postpartum and Nulliparous Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thomas, Karen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7262, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-543-8231</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kthomas@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Robert L. Burr, MSEE, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Minimal research has characterized melatonin in the postpartum period despite its close connection to sleep and circadian rhythms which are altered by infant caregiving demands. Purpose: Twenty-four hour measures of melatonin were compared in healthy postpartum and nulliparous women. Research questions included: (1) Do urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels over a 24-hour period differ in postpartum and nulliparous women of childbearing age? (2) Does the timing of urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin onset differ in postpartum and nulliparous women? <br/>Methods: Thirty-eight postpartum and 20 nulliparous, age 18 to 40 years, women living in typical environments collected a sample of each voiding throughout a 24-hour period. Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (6-sMT) was assayed (ELISA) and corrected for volume using creatinine measured using spectrophotometry. Within subject values for 6-sMT mean, maximum, percent rise, and timing of melatonin onset (defined as baseline mean + 2 SD) were determined. 6-sMT levels were compared using MANOVA. Proportion of 6-sMT rise occurring during night time was compared using Z scores. The time profile for melatonin was represented as normalized cumulative area under the curve and compared using Mann-Whitney U. Results: Postpartum women had significantly higher baseline, lower maximum, and lower percent rise 6-sMT than nulliparous women (p &lt; 0.005) and significantly lower proportion of 6-sMT rise occurring during night time hours (Z = 4.338, p &lt; .000). The pattern of 6-sMT production over 24-hours differed between groups (p = 0.016). Implications: Findings suggest postpartum differences in amount and timing of melatonin. While environment light exposure during night time infant caregiving is a likely explanation, further research is needed to determine sleep and circadian influences in the postpartum period. Entrainment to circadian rhythm, reflected in the timing of melatonin onset, is linked to health outcomes. Implications of melatonin level are not well understood, however melatonin exerts wide influences beyond being a marker of light-dark pattern including connections with breast cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Funding: National Institute of Nursing Research (K01-NR00167 and 2 P30 NR04001).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:17:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:17:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.