2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157878
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive Evaluation of Traumatically Brain Injured Rats: A Novel Paradigm
Abstract:
Cognitive Evaluation of Traumatically Brain Injured Rats: A Novel Paradigm
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Thompson, Hilaire, PhD, APRN, BC, CNRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195-7266, USA
Contact Telephone:206-616-5641
Purpose: To assess the applicability of the serial application of various Morris water maze (MWM) testing strategies to determine cognitive function following experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the same group of rats. Background: The MWM has been frequently used as a tool to evaluate the effects of brain injury on either memory (retrograde amnesia) or learning (anterograde amnesia) in experimental models of at single points in time. Animals are usually trained to either the memory or the learning paradigm, and not tested across multiple time points. The validation of such a test in brain-injured animals would allow for longer evaluation of cognitive functioning in these animals as well as reducing the number of animals required for long-term studies using multiple time points and repetitive testing of cognitive evaluation. Method: All procedures used in the experiments were approved by the university's Animal Use and Care Committee and National Institute of Health's Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=27) were anesthetized and subjected to either sham injury (n=9) or lateral fluid percussion brain injury of moderate severity (n=18). At 4 weeks post-injury, animals were trained in a water maze over 3 days (acquisition/learning phase) to find a submerged platform. Average swim speed (swim distance/time in maze) was calculated for each trial. At 8 weeks post-injury the hidden platform was then moved to the opposite quadrant, and animals were trained to find the new position of the platform over 3 days. Forty-eight hours later, animals were tested for memory retention in a probe trial in which the platform was not present. The tracking/swimming patterns of the two groups were also assessed to determine the ability to "shift" strategies within the maze, employing a 7 pattern qualitative categorization of prototypical behavior in the MWM. Results: Brain-injured animals had significant learning impairment (p<0.0001), shifted-learning impairment (p<0.0001) and memory retention deficits (p<0.01) in comparison to their sham-injured counterparts over the 8 week testing period. Swim speed and distance were not significantly altered by brain injury at any time point. Brain-injured animals demonstrated a lack of pliancy to efficiently switch search strategies up to 8 weeks post-injury. Implications: The validation of this testing paradigm using a clinically relevant experimental brain injury model is an important addition to behavioral outcome testing. As deficits in memory and cognition are commonly observed in survivors of TBI, causing reduced quality of life for the patient, a major goal in both clinical and experimental TBI research is to identify and evaluate cognitive deficits. The present study assessed the applicability of the serial MWM test to determine cognitive function following experimental TBI in the same group of rats which is particularly important for long-term studies and increasingly valuable for the evaluation of novel treatment strategies. This study was supported, in part, by NIH T32-NS043126 and T32NR07106.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive Evaluation of Traumatically Brain Injured Rats: A Novel Paradigmen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157878-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cognitive Evaluation of Traumatically Brain Injured Rats: A Novel Paradigm</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thompson, Hilaire, PhD, APRN, BC, CNRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195-7266, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-616-5641</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hilairet@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To assess the applicability of the serial application of various Morris water maze (MWM) testing strategies to determine cognitive function following experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the same group of rats. Background: The MWM has been frequently used as a tool to evaluate the effects of brain injury on either memory (retrograde amnesia) or learning (anterograde amnesia) in experimental models of at single points in time. Animals are usually trained to either the memory or the learning paradigm, and not tested across multiple time points. The validation of such a test in brain-injured animals would allow for longer evaluation of cognitive functioning in these animals as well as reducing the number of animals required for long-term studies using multiple time points and repetitive testing of cognitive evaluation. Method: All procedures used in the experiments were approved by the university's Animal Use and Care Committee and National Institute of Health's Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=27) were anesthetized and subjected to either sham injury (n=9) or lateral fluid percussion brain injury of moderate severity (n=18). At 4 weeks post-injury, animals were trained in a water maze over 3 days (acquisition/learning phase) to find a submerged platform. Average swim speed (swim distance/time in maze) was calculated for each trial. At 8 weeks post-injury the hidden platform was then moved to the opposite quadrant, and animals were trained to find the new position of the platform over 3 days. Forty-eight hours later, animals were tested for memory retention in a probe trial in which the platform was not present. The tracking/swimming patterns of the two groups were also assessed to determine the ability to &quot;shift&quot; strategies within the maze, employing a 7 pattern qualitative categorization of prototypical behavior in the MWM. Results: Brain-injured animals had significant learning impairment (p&lt;0.0001), shifted-learning impairment (p&lt;0.0001) and memory retention deficits (p&lt;0.01) in comparison to their sham-injured counterparts over the 8 week testing period. Swim speed and distance were not significantly altered by brain injury at any time point. Brain-injured animals demonstrated a lack of pliancy to efficiently switch search strategies up to 8 weeks post-injury. Implications: The validation of this testing paradigm using a clinically relevant experimental brain injury model is an important addition to behavioral outcome testing. As deficits in memory and cognition are commonly observed in survivors of TBI, causing reduced quality of life for the patient, a major goal in both clinical and experimental TBI research is to identify and evaluate cognitive deficits. The present study assessed the applicability of the serial MWM test to determine cognitive function following experimental TBI in the same group of rats which is particularly important for long-term studies and increasingly valuable for the evaluation of novel treatment strategies. This study was supported, in part, by NIH T32-NS043126 and T32NR07106.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:17:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:17:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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