2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157883
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Managing Chronic Illness: Older Adults from the Former Soviet Union
Abstract:
Managing Chronic Illness: Older Adults from the Former Soviet Union
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Van Son, Catherine, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
Contact Address:9302 NE 82nd Avenue, Vancouver, WA, 98662, USA
Purposes/Aims: As the population of the US ages and becomes more culturally diverse, managing chronic illnesses will become increasingly more complex. Understanding the role culture plays in healthcare delivery is required if ethnically diverse older adults and their families are to successfully manage chronic illness. This study describes how chronic illness is experienced and managed by Evangelical Russian-speaking older adults and family caregivers from the Former Soviet Union (FSU); examines how culture (healthcare beliefs and behaviors) influences the management of chronic illnesses; and identifies barriers to managing chronic illness from the perspective of Russian-speaking participants.
Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: During the 1990's, over 500,000 newcomers from the FSU migrated to the US Pacific Rim. Twenty to twenty-five percent of this group is over the age of 65. Managing chronic illnesses is complicated due to language barriers, traumatic prior life experiences, socio-economic factors and religious beliefs. Kleinman's explanatory model of illness was used to elicit the culturally constructed ways in which chronic illness is experienced and managed in this population of older adults. Methods: A focused ethnographic design with multiple data collection methods was used. During a 10-month period, participant observations, interviews, and artifacts were collected. Twenty-four interviews were completed with Russian-speaking older adults, family caregivers and key informants. Fieldwork included teaching citizenship classes, shopping at Slavic businesses, attending a Slavic church and other social activities as invited. Results: Managing chronic illness in this group was strongly related to their interactions with the healthcare system and healthcare providers. Five main themes were found: (a) not being heard; (b) doing what they know; (c) trusting their own; (d) guarding what they say, and (e) dialogue with healthcare providers. Not being heard described both their historical life experiences when living in the FSU and their lives as newcomers here in the US. As a result of not being heard, they responded by: (a) doing what they know- using popular (folk) medicine (narodnaya meditsina) such as herbs, Russian pharmaceuticals, and home remedies; b) trusting their own - seeking advice and support from family members, their church, and Russian-speaking healthcare providers both in the US and the FSU; and (c) guarding what they say - cautious self-disclosure influenced by the level of trust they had with others. Responses were influenced by the level of trust they had with their healthcare provider and/or the healthcare system. Implications: The management of chronic illness is navigated by experiences of one?s past and present. Evangelical, Russian-speaking older adults blend what they know and trust with their experiences in what sometimes feels like a cold and threatening health care system. Providers must elicit illness narratives from older adults to create a dialogue built on trust, so that older adults will utilize the evidenced-based therapeutic interventions available to help them manage their chronic conditions. Funding Support: NINR- Individual NRSA F31-NR008816 & Northwest Health Foundation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleManaging Chronic Illness: Older Adults from the Former Soviet Unionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157883-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Managing Chronic Illness: Older Adults from the Former Soviet Union</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Van Son, Catherine, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9302 NE 82nd Avenue, Vancouver, WA, 98662, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vansonc@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: As the population of the US ages and becomes more culturally diverse, managing chronic illnesses will become increasingly more complex. Understanding the role culture plays in healthcare delivery is required if ethnically diverse older adults and their families are to successfully manage chronic illness. This study describes how chronic illness is experienced and managed by Evangelical Russian-speaking older adults and family caregivers from the Former Soviet Union (FSU); examines how culture (healthcare beliefs and behaviors) influences the management of chronic illnesses; and identifies barriers to managing chronic illness from the perspective of Russian-speaking participants.<br/>Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: During the 1990's, over 500,000 newcomers from the FSU migrated to the US Pacific Rim. Twenty to twenty-five percent of this group is over the age of 65. Managing chronic illnesses is complicated due to language barriers, traumatic prior life experiences, socio-economic factors and religious beliefs. Kleinman's explanatory model of illness was used to elicit the culturally constructed ways in which chronic illness is experienced and managed in this population of older adults. Methods: A focused ethnographic design with multiple data collection methods was used. During a 10-month period, participant observations, interviews, and artifacts were collected. Twenty-four interviews were completed with Russian-speaking older adults, family caregivers and key informants. Fieldwork included teaching citizenship classes, shopping at Slavic businesses, attending a Slavic church and other social activities as invited. Results: Managing chronic illness in this group was strongly related to their interactions with the healthcare system and healthcare providers. Five main themes were found: (a) not being heard; (b) doing what they know; (c) trusting their own; (d) guarding what they say, and (e) dialogue with healthcare providers. Not being heard described both their historical life experiences when living in the FSU and their lives as newcomers here in the US. As a result of not being heard, they responded by: (a) doing what they know- using popular (folk) medicine (narodnaya meditsina) such as herbs, Russian pharmaceuticals, and home remedies; b) trusting their own - seeking advice and support from family members, their church, and Russian-speaking healthcare providers both in the US and the FSU; and (c) guarding what they say - cautious self-disclosure influenced by the level of trust they had with others. Responses were influenced by the level of trust they had with their healthcare provider and/or the healthcare system. Implications: The management of chronic illness is navigated by experiences of one?s past and present. Evangelical, Russian-speaking older adults blend what they know and trust with their experiences in what sometimes feels like a cold and threatening health care system. Providers must elicit illness narratives from older adults to create a dialogue built on trust, so that older adults will utilize the evidenced-based therapeutic interventions available to help them manage their chronic conditions. Funding Support: NINR- Individual NRSA F31-NR008816 &amp; Northwest Health Foundation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:17:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:17:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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