2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157884
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Culturally Tailored Diabetes Self-Management for Mexican-Americans: A Pilot
Abstract:
Culturally Tailored Diabetes Self-Management for Mexican-Americans: A Pilot
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Vincent, Deborah, PhD, RN, FAANP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:5344 N Ventana Overlook Place, Tucson, AZ, 85750, USA
Contact Telephone:520-626-9969
Purpose/Aims: Diabetes Mellitus, a serious potentially debilitating chronic illness, has reached epidemic proportions in the United States and affects Hispanics disproportionately to their numbers in the U.S. population. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of implementing a culturally tailored diabetes mellitus (DM) education and behavioral self-management program for urban Mexican-Americans. The aims were to determine the extent to which urban Mexican-Americans attended the eight sessions of the culturally tailored DM self-management program and to assess the effect of the program on the behavioral outcomes of diabetes knowledge, self-efficacy, and diabetes disease self-management behaviors and biologic outcomes of blood glucose, hemoglobin A1C, weight, and BMI. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: The risk of developing type 2 diabetes for Mexican-Americans, the largest Hispanic sub-group is, nearly three times that of non-Hispanics and the mortality rate is twice that of non-Hispanics. Both prevalence and complication risk appear to be multifactorial and include genetics, lifestyle, cultural beliefs, and access to care. Mexican-Americans seem to have difficulty achieving adequate glucose control and, as a result, have often been labeled as non-compliant. Translating self-management programs into workable processes for Mexican-Americans populations is challenging, primarily because so much of self-management depends on patients changing their cultural patterns of eating and activity. The conceptual model used to guide the study and address behavior change is based on Lorig's Chronic Disease Self-Management Program. The model states that the higher a person's sense of self-efficacy, the more likely that person will be to make necessary lifestyle changes. More importantly, self-efficacy can be increased through performance mastery, modeling, reinterpretation of symptoms, and social persuasion. Methods: The study used a pre-test/post-test control group design with 10 subjects in each group (N = 20). The study assessed feasibility and acceptability of the tailored diabetes self-management program by examining ease of recruitment, retention rates, change in the behavioral outcomes of self-efficacy, diabetes knowledge, self-care measures, and change in the biologic outcomes of weight, BMI, HbA1c and blood glucose. Results: Successful recruitment of participants came from personal referrals from providers or the promotora. Retention rates were 100% for the intervention group and 80% for the control group. Data were collected at baseline, at the end of the intervention (week 8) and 12 weeks after the onset of the intervention. The majority of the sample was female (75%), married (50%), mean age of 57 (SD = 9.5, range 37-74). The sample tended to be in the lower socio-economic bracket with 75% reporting an income of less than $20,000 a year and had a mean of nine years of education. Preliminary findings suggest that the intervention had a positive clinical and statistical affect on diabetes knowledge, weight, and BMI. Improvements were also noted in self-efficacy scores, blood glucose and HbA1c but these did not reach significance. The control group had an increase in weight, BMI, and HbA1c but these were not statistically significant. Implications: Findings from the study suggest that a culturally tailored diabetes self-management program may result in improved outcomes for Mexican-Americans with type 2 Diabetes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCulturally Tailored Diabetes Self-Management for Mexican-Americans: A Piloten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157884-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Culturally Tailored Diabetes Self-Management for Mexican-Americans: A Pilot</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vincent, Deborah, PhD, RN, FAANP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5344 N Ventana Overlook Place, Tucson, AZ, 85750, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-626-9969</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dvincent@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: Diabetes Mellitus, a serious potentially debilitating chronic illness, has reached epidemic proportions in the United States and affects Hispanics disproportionately to their numbers in the U.S. population. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of implementing a culturally tailored diabetes mellitus (DM) education and behavioral self-management program for urban Mexican-Americans. The aims were to determine the extent to which urban Mexican-Americans attended the eight sessions of the culturally tailored DM self-management program and to assess the effect of the program on the behavioral outcomes of diabetes knowledge, self-efficacy, and diabetes disease self-management behaviors and biologic outcomes of blood glucose, hemoglobin A1C, weight, and BMI. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: The risk of developing type 2 diabetes for Mexican-Americans, the largest Hispanic sub-group is, nearly three times that of non-Hispanics and the mortality rate is twice that of non-Hispanics. Both prevalence and complication risk appear to be multifactorial and include genetics, lifestyle, cultural beliefs, and access to care. Mexican-Americans seem to have difficulty achieving adequate glucose control and, as a result, have often been labeled as non-compliant. Translating self-management programs into workable processes for Mexican-Americans populations is challenging, primarily because so much of self-management depends on patients changing their cultural patterns of eating and activity. The conceptual model used to guide the study and address behavior change is based on Lorig's Chronic Disease Self-Management Program. The model states that the higher a person's sense of self-efficacy, the more likely that person will be to make necessary lifestyle changes. More importantly, self-efficacy can be increased through performance mastery, modeling, reinterpretation of symptoms, and social persuasion. Methods: The study used a pre-test/post-test control group design with 10 subjects in each group (N = 20). The study assessed feasibility and acceptability of the tailored diabetes self-management program by examining ease of recruitment, retention rates, change in the behavioral outcomes of self-efficacy, diabetes knowledge, self-care measures, and change in the biologic outcomes of weight, BMI, HbA1c and blood glucose. Results: Successful recruitment of participants came from personal referrals from providers or the promotora. Retention rates were 100% for the intervention group and 80% for the control group. Data were collected at baseline, at the end of the intervention (week 8) and 12 weeks after the onset of the intervention. The majority of the sample was female (75%), married (50%), mean age of 57 (SD = 9.5, range 37-74). The sample tended to be in the lower socio-economic bracket with 75% reporting an income of less than $20,000 a year and had a mean of nine years of education. Preliminary findings suggest that the intervention had a positive clinical and statistical affect on diabetes knowledge, weight, and BMI. Improvements were also noted in self-efficacy scores, blood glucose and HbA1c but these did not reach significance. The control group had an increase in weight, BMI, and HbA1c but these were not statistically significant. Implications: Findings from the study suggest that a culturally tailored diabetes self-management program may result in improved outcomes for Mexican-Americans with type 2 Diabetes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:17:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:17:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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