2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157886
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Meaning of Culturally Competent Care to Latino Elders
Abstract:
Meaning of Culturally Competent Care to Latino Elders
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:White, Nancy, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Northern Colorado
Title:Professor
Contact Address:213 Cobble Drive, Windsor, CO, 80550-6147, USA
Contact Telephone:970-351-2662
Co-Authors:Faye Hummel, RN, PhD and Diane Peters, RN, PhD
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of elder Latinos regarding their interactions with the health care system. The study was conducted in a community in which 30% of the population is Latino. The following research questions guided this study: 1) What are the expectations of Latino elders for culturally sensitive health care? 2) What are the consequences for Latino elders when health care is provided in a culturally sensitive manner? 3) What are the consequences for Latino elders when health care is not provided in a culturally sensitive manner?
Background: Failure to provide culturally competent care has been implicated in poorer health outcomes, lack of adherence to medical recommendations, and delays in seeking health care. Latinos represent the largest minority group in the U.S. and the elder Latino population is expected to increase by 400% over the next decade. It is important to gain an understanding of the health care values and beliefs of this vulnerable population. Method: The ethnonursing method was used to conduct the study. Eight key informants and 25 general informants were interviewed. The key informants were Latino elders who were members of a community social group meeting once a week at the Latino community center for lunch and bingo. The general informants included members of that community who agreed to be interviewed as a group (10), medical assistants employed at a community health clinic serving the Latino population (10), a Latino pastor from the hospital, Latino service providers (3), and an Anglo representative of alliance for health care services in the county. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed according to Leininger's (1995) ethnonursing methodology. Results: The preliminary findings revealed three major themes and several patterns supporting each theme. The themes include: 1) Family as protector and buffer, 2) In the scheme of things cultural insensitivity is not an issue and, 3) Identification of factors promoting cultural sensitivity. Most informants described relative satisfaction with their current health care and health care provider. However, they clearly articulated care behaviors that were distressful to them as well as behaviors they sought from health care providers. It was unclear whether the reported distress is a result of the general dysfunction and impersonal nature of the health care system or cultural imposition by health care providers. Implications: Elder Latinos described considerations for health care providers that translate into guidelines for providing culturally sensitive health care. In addition, there are important policy implications for these findings that will influence the health care of vulnerable populations. Funded by a Faculty Research and Publication Grant from the University of Northern Colorado.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeaning of Culturally Competent Care to Latino Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157886-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Meaning of Culturally Competent Care to Latino Elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">White, Nancy, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Northern Colorado</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">213 Cobble Drive, Windsor, CO, 80550-6147, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">970-351-2662</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nancy.white@unco.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Faye Hummel, RN, PhD and Diane Peters, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of elder Latinos regarding their interactions with the health care system. The study was conducted in a community in which 30% of the population is Latino. The following research questions guided this study: 1) What are the expectations of Latino elders for culturally sensitive health care? 2) What are the consequences for Latino elders when health care is provided in a culturally sensitive manner? 3) What are the consequences for Latino elders when health care is not provided in a culturally sensitive manner? <br/>Background: Failure to provide culturally competent care has been implicated in poorer health outcomes, lack of adherence to medical recommendations, and delays in seeking health care. Latinos represent the largest minority group in the U.S. and the elder Latino population is expected to increase by 400% over the next decade. It is important to gain an understanding of the health care values and beliefs of this vulnerable population. Method: The ethnonursing method was used to conduct the study. Eight key informants and 25 general informants were interviewed. The key informants were Latino elders who were members of a community social group meeting once a week at the Latino community center for lunch and bingo. The general informants included members of that community who agreed to be interviewed as a group (10), medical assistants employed at a community health clinic serving the Latino population (10), a Latino pastor from the hospital, Latino service providers (3), and an Anglo representative of alliance for health care services in the county. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed according to Leininger's (1995) ethnonursing methodology. Results: The preliminary findings revealed three major themes and several patterns supporting each theme. The themes include: 1) Family as protector and buffer, 2) In the scheme of things cultural insensitivity is not an issue and, 3) Identification of factors promoting cultural sensitivity. Most informants described relative satisfaction with their current health care and health care provider. However, they clearly articulated care behaviors that were distressful to them as well as behaviors they sought from health care providers. It was unclear whether the reported distress is a result of the general dysfunction and impersonal nature of the health care system or cultural imposition by health care providers. Implications: Elder Latinos described considerations for health care providers that translate into guidelines for providing culturally sensitive health care. In addition, there are important policy implications for these findings that will influence the health care of vulnerable populations. Funded by a Faculty Research and Publication Grant from the University of Northern Colorado.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:17:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:17:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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